The Zeitgeist Movement

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The Zeitgeist Movement
Zeitgeist Movement globe.png
Movement logo
AbbreviationTZM or ZM
Formation2008[1]
TypeSocial movement
Region servedGlobal
Key peoplePeter Joseph
Websitewww.thezeitgeistmovement.com
 
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The Zeitgeist Movement
Zeitgeist Movement globe.png
Movement logo
AbbreviationTZM or ZM
Formation2008[1]
TypeSocial movement
Region servedGlobal
Key peoplePeter Joseph
Websitewww.thezeitgeistmovement.com

The Zeitgeist Movement describes itself as a grassroots, sustainability advocacy organization. Established in 2008 by Peter Joseph, the organization claims to have no official leaders.[2] The movement advocates transition from a money-based economic system to what they define as a resource-based economy.[3]

Philosophy[edit]

The group advocates the elimination of money and private property.[4][5] Information from the group describes the current socioeconomic system as structurally corrupt and in need of replacement with their concept of a system based on efficient use of resources and sustainable development.[6][7][8] The Zeitgeist Movement advocates renewable energy and automatic systems world wide, to collect, process, and distribute food and shelter, and other necessary aspects of living, without using a price system.[4][8]

History[edit]

Following Peter Joseph's first major film, Zeitgeist: The Movie (2007),[4] people contacted him asking what to do about these issues.[9] Joseph's second film, Zeitgeist: Addendum (2008), featured a sequence at the end of the film which introduced The Zeitgeist Movement.[10] A large following precipitated from the fanbase of the first two films and became organized into what is now The Zeitgeist Movement.[10] The movement used to be the activist arm of The Venus Project (TVP), which featured in Zeitgeist: Addendum and Zeitgeist: Moving Forward (2011) as a possible solution to Earth's cultural and ecological problems,[7] but in April 2011 the groups split and are no longer associated with each other.[11] The name of the group comes from the word "zeitgeist," which refers to the "spirit of the age" or "spirit of the time."

Over the years, The Zeitgeist Movement's ideals and views about the world have spread through local chapters, theater, online, and via DVD releases of films.[5]

Zeitgeist Day (Z-Day)[edit]

The movement holds an annual event, Z-Day, in March.[4][7] It was first held in 2009 in New York City.[6] The 2010 event also took place in New York, with "337 sympathetic events occurring in over 70 countries worldwide."[4] London hosted the 2011 event[12] and Vancouver hosted the 2012 main event.[13] The 2013 main event was held in Los Angeles at the Barnsdall Gallery in Hollywood.[14]

Criticisms[edit]

The Huffington Post,[4] The New York Times,[6] The Palm Beach Post,[15] Globes,[8] TheMarker,[7] and Reason magazine[16] have reported the critical reaction to various aspects of the Zeitgeist movement, including: (a) utopianism, (b) reduced work incentives in their proposed economy, (c) practical difficulties in a transition to that economy, and (d) subscribing to 9/11 conspiracy theories in Zeitgeist: The Movie. Peter Joseph responded to the criticism by saying that practical difficulties could be overcome and that Zeitgeist does not believe in utopia but advocates updating society's notions of economics and politics continuously, re-aligning them with new scientific and technical discoveries, while keeping workers motivated. According to Joseph there is no direct association between the conspiracy theories in the first Zeitgeist documentary and the movement.[17]

An article in the Journal of Contemporary Religion described the movement as an example of a "conspirituality," a synthesis of New Age spirituality and conspiracy theory, asserting that Zeitgeist: The Movie claims that "organised religion is about social control and that 9/11 was an inside job."[18] The movement said that the article paints an "incorrect, misleading, offensive and defaming picture of the movement," and that the conspiracy narratives in the first movie are unrelated to the movement.[17]

In Tablet magazine, journalist Michelle Goldberg criticized Zeitgeist: The Movie as being "steeped in far-right, isolationist, and covertly anti-Semitic conspiracy theories," and called the Zeitgeist movement "the world's first Internet-based cult, with members who parrot the party line with cheerful, rote fidelity."[9] Zeitgeist said the accusations were "erroneous, pejorative, derogatory, and intended to silence the movement's message," and that the movement does not blame international bankers, corporate leaders or politicians as individuals, but rather the global socioeconomic system that supports their values.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "TZM – Mission Statement". Retrieved April 2, 2013. 
  2. ^ http://www.thezeitgeistmovement.com/faq#faq6
  3. ^ http://www.thezeitgeistmovement.com/mission-statement
  4. ^ a b c d e f "The Zeitgeist Movement: Envisioning A Sustainable Future". Huffington Post. Mar 16, 2010. 
  5. ^ a b New world re-order: The Zeitgeist Movement spreads to Ventura County, Shane Cohn, VC Reporter (California), May 12, 2011
  6. ^ a b c "They’ve Seen the Future and Dislike the Present". New York Times. 2009-03-16. 
  7. ^ a b c d e Quotations and citations in this Wikipedia article are based on the translation from Hebrew to English of The Filmmaker Who Helped Recruit Millions for the Global Protests of the Bottom 99%, original Hebrew article by Asher Schechter, TheMarker (Israel), January 19, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c Quotations and citations in this Wikipedia article are based on the translation from Hebrew to English of Imagine, original Hebrew article by Tzaela Kotler, Globes (Israel), March 18, 2010.
  9. ^ a b http://www.tabletmag.com/jewish-news-and-politics/57732/brave-new-world Retrieved June 9, 2012
  10. ^ a b Bill Stamets (February 15, 2011). "Art-house films: ‘Marwencol,’ ‘Zeitgeist’". Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved March 7, 2011. 
  11. ^ http://www.blogtalkradio.com/v-radio/2011/04/26/venus-project-explains-their-relationship-with-exemplar-zero
  12. ^ http://www.meetup.com/Zeitgeist-Movement-London/events/16375790/
  13. ^ "Zeitgeist Day 2012 – Vogue Theatre in Vancouver, BC". voguetheatre.com. 
  14. ^ http://www.zmca.org/news-events/zday-2013-main-event
  15. ^ A dream worth having, Rhonda Swan, The Palm Beach Post, April 30, 2009
  16. ^ http://spectator.org/archives/2011/01/17/jared-loughners-zeitgeist-obse Retrieval 2012-07-07
  17. ^ a b Understanding The Zeitgeist Movement Critics, The Zeitgeist Movement, July 15, 2012
  18. ^ Ward, Charlotte; Voas, David (2011). "The Emergence of Conspirituality". Journal of Contemporary Religion 26 (1): 109. doi:10.1080/13537903.2011.539846. Retrieved June 16, 2012. 

External links[edit]