The Westing Game

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The Westing Game
Westing cover.jpg
First edition
AuthorEllen Raskin
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
SeriesNA
GenreMystery
PublisherE. P. Dutton
Publication date
1978
Pages182 or 217 pages
ISBNISBN 0-525-47137-5
ISBN 0-14-240120-X
ISBN 0-14-038664-5
OCLC53292898
LC ClassPZ7.R1817 We 2003
 
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The Westing Game
Westing cover.jpg
First edition
AuthorEllen Raskin
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
SeriesNA
GenreMystery
PublisherE. P. Dutton
Publication date
1978
Pages182 or 217 pages
ISBNISBN 0-525-47137-5
ISBN 0-14-240120-X
ISBN 0-14-038664-5
OCLC53292898
LC ClassPZ7.R1817 We 2003

The Westing Game is a 1979 Newbery Medal winning novel by Ellen Raskin.[1] It has been adapted into a movie, released under both the names The Westing Game and Get a Clue. This book centers on the adventures of Sam Westing's sixteen heirs after they are challenged by him to unravel the secret behind his death.

Plot[edit]

Sixteen heirs who are mysteriously chosen to live in the Sunset Towers apartment building on the shore of Lake Michigan which has 5 floors, somewhere in Milwaukee, come together to hear the will of the self-made millionaire, Samuel W. Westing. The will takes the form of a puzzle, dividing the sixteen heirs into eight pairs, giving each pair a different set of clues which consist of almost all of the lyrics from "America the Beautiful", and challenging them to solve the mystery of who murdered Sam Westing. As an incentive, each heir is given $10,000 to play the game. Whoever solves the mystery will inherit Sam Westing's $200,000,000 fortune, and his company, Westing Paper Products.

Heirs[edit]

Aftermath[edit]

The epilogue of the story is told in the book's last three chapters, which depicts the heirs growing older and more successful, many of them changing their lives as a result of the game.

Other media[edit]

The Westing Game, adapted by Darian Lindle and directed by Terry Brino-Dean, was first produced at Prime Stage Theatre in Pittsburgh in 2009. The script is published by Dramatic Publishing.

Get A Clue, adapted by Dylan Kelsey Hadley and directed by Terence H. Winkless was produced for television in 1997 and edited by Sum Ting Wong

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Newbery Medal & Honor Books, 1922-Present". Association for Library Service to Children. Retrieved 11 January 2011. 

External links[edit]

Awards
Preceded by
Bridge to Terabithia
Newbery Medal recipient
1979
Succeeded by
A Gathering of Days: A New England Girl's Journal