The Story of Ferdinand

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The Story of Ferdinand
The Story of Ferdinand.jpg
Author(s)Munro Leaf
Cover artistRobert Lawson
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Genre(s)Children's literature
Publication date1936
Media typePrint (hardcover and paperback)
 
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The Story of Ferdinand
The Story of Ferdinand.jpg
Author(s)Munro Leaf
Cover artistRobert Lawson
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Genre(s)Children's literature
Publication date1936
Media typePrint (hardcover and paperback)

The Story of Ferdinand (1936) is the best known work written by American author Munro Leaf and illustrated by Robert Lawson. The children's book tells the story of a bull who would rather smell flowers than fight in bullfights. He sits in the middle of the bull ring failing to take heed of any of the provocations of the matador and others to fight.

The book was released nine months before the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, but was still seen by many supporters of Francisco Franco as a pacifist book.

Leaf is said to have written the story on a whim in an afternoon in 1935, largely to provide his friend, illustrator Robert Lawson (then relatively unknown) a forum in which to showcase his talents.

The landscape in which Lawson placed the fictional Ferdinand is more or less real. Lawson faithfully reproduced the view of the city of Ronda in Andalusia for his illustration of Ferdinand being brought to Madrid on a cart: we see the Puente Nuevo ("New Bridge") spanning the El Tajo canyon. The Disney movie added some rather accurate views of Ronda and the Puente Romano ("Roman bridge") and the Puente Viejo ("Old bridge") at the beginning of the story, where Lawson's pictures were more free. Ronda is home to the oldest bullfighting ring in Spain that is still used; this might have been a reason for Lawson's use of its surroundings as a background for the story.

Contents

Film

The story was adapted by Walt Disney as a short animated film entitled Ferdinand the Bull in 1938, in a style similar to his Silly Symphonies series (and sometimes considered an unofficial part of that series). Ferdinand the Bull won the 1938 Academy Award for Best Short Subject (Cartoons).

In 2011, it was reported that Fox Animation acquired the rights to the story to adapt it into a CG feature film with Carlos Saldanha attached to direct it.[1]

Legacy

Poster from the Federal Theatre Project, Work Projects Administration production, 1937

A plushie of Ferdinand plays a significant role in the 1940 film Dance, Girl, Dance. The toy is passed between various characters, having been originally purchased as a memento of a visit to a nightclub called Ferdinand's. The nightclub has a large statue of Ferdinand at the rear of the bandstand.

Marvel Comics featured a recurring character named Rintrah in the pages of Doctor Strange. This extraterrestrial anthropomorphic bull was frequently referred to as Ferdinand for a gentle and kind nature

In the film Pursuit to Algiers, Mrs. Dunham compares Dr. Watson to Ferdinand the Bull because he would rather drink sherry than exert himself by going on a three–mile hike.

Ferdinand made an appearance in the 1997 film "Strays," a Sundance favorite written/directed/starring a then-unknown Vin Diesel. The story of Ferdinand, the bull who followed his heart and proved that just because you're a bull you don't have to act like one, served as a major influence and spirit of the film's plot.

Ferdinand again appeared in the 2009 movie The Blind Side, the story of Michael Oher, a film with a similar metaphorical message as Leaf's book. The movie includes a scene where a coach mentions that Michael would rather stare at balloons than hit someone. The character played by Sandra Bullock then replies "Ferdinand the Bull."

A rubber mask of Ferdinand is featured in the Stephen King novel Rose Madder.

The story was set to incidental music in "Ferdinand the Bull" by classical composer Mark Fish. It has been narrated in concert[when?] by David Ogden Stiers and by Emmy award-winner Roscoe Lee Browne. Fish and Stiers have co-produced a recording of a reduced version of the piece for cello and piano, recorded by northwest composer Jack Gabel and released by North Pacific Music.[2] It was also adapted, in 1971, as a piece for solo violin and narrator by the British composer Alan Ridout.[3]

Singer-songwriter Elliott Smith had a tattoo of Ferdinand the Bull, from the cover of Munro Leaf's book, on his right upper arm, which is visible on the cover of his record Either/Or. The rock band Fall Out Boy named their third album From Under The Cork Tree after a phrase in the book.[4]

Richard Horvitz commented that fellow actor and friend Fred Willard performed this story as a 5th grade class play when Fred was a child.

According to one scholar, the book crosses gender lines in that it offers a character to whom both boys and girls can relate.[5]

The short film is broadcast in several countries every year on Christmas Eve as a part of the annual Disney Christmas show From All of Us to All of You.

In 1951, Holiday magazine published an Ernest Hemingway children's story called The Faithful Bull.[6] This story has been interpreted as a "rebuttal" to the earlier Leaf book.[7]

In 2012, American artist Michael Rakowitz, working with sculptor and preservationist Bert Praxenthaler and stone carvers from Bamiyan, Afghanistan,[8] presented a stone sculpture of the book as part of his piece in Documenta (13), a major art exhibition in Kassel, Germany. According to Rakowitz's exhibit text, Ferdinand "caused an international controversy" when it was first published, due to its perceived pacifist tone, and was banned in Spain (then ruled by Francisco Franco), and "burned in Nazi Germany." [9]

References

  1. ^ Brodesser-Akner, Claude (2011-02-18). "Fox, Ice Age Director Bullish on The Story of Ferdinand". New York. http://nymag.com/daily/entertainment/2011/02/the_story_of_ferdinand.html. Retrieved 2011-02-19. 
  2. ^ Ferdinand the Bull and Friends reviewed by Dot Rust in the Oregon Music News Nov.12, 2010
  3. ^ A performance of the piece, by the violinist Ruth Rogers and her mother, Juliet Rogers, formed part of the concert “Musical Bridge: An evening of classical music inspired by Burma” at Christ Church, Spitalfields in London on May 15th, 2010.
  4. ^ "Fall Out Boy—From Under The Cork Tree". The Syndicate. 2005. Archived from the original on 2006-11-20. http://web.archive.org/web/20061120191032/http://www.thesyn.com/college/general7/fall_tracks.asp. Retrieved 2007-05-14. "When he was a little boy, Fall Out Boy bassist and lyricist Pete Wentz enjoyed reading "Curious George," "Babar" and Richard Scarry, but his favorite children's book was "The Story of Ferdinand" by Munro Leaf. The story (...) was so inspirational to Wentz that he titled the band's breakthrough record From Under the Cork Tree." 
  5. ^ Spitz, Ellen Handler (1999). Inside Picture Books. Yale University Press. pp. 176–177. ISBN 0-300-07602-9. 
  6. ^ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Complete_Short_Stories_of_Ernest_Hemingway
  7. ^ http://librarytypos.blogspot.de/2012/03/ferdinad-for-ferdinand.html
  8. ^ http://www.artinamericamagazine.com/news-opinion/finer-things/2012-07-05/documenta-4-books-afghanistan/
  9. ^ http://blog.ignasiesteve.cat/page/2

External links