Ross Sisters

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The Ross Sisters were a trio of female sibling singing dancers consisting of Aggie Ross, Elmira Ross, and Maggie Ross [1] (whose real names were Veda Victoria, Dixie Jewel and Betsy Ann Ross).[2] The Ross Sisters performed as a 3-part harmony trio wherein they also danced and did acrobatics and contortionism. Their public attention peaked during the 1940s, during which they were featured prominently in the film Broadway Rhythm.[3] This footage has since gained popularity on YouTube.[4] This clip also appears in the compilation film That's Entertainment! III (1994).

Biographies

The Ross Sisters were born in West Texas, to Charles Adolphus and Veda Cordelia Ross. Shortly after they made "Broadway Rhythm," they moved to Europe where they appeared in "Piccadilly Hayride," a post-war London stage revue that ran from 1946 to 1948.[5] They also recorded "Five Minutes More," a song later covered by Frank Sinatra.

Betsy Ann Ross (Aggie) was born June 26, 1926, in Colorado City, Texas. She married Robert "Bunny" Hightower, an American dancer, on January 11, 1947. He was an alcoholic and suffered from schizophrenia. On one schizophrenic occasion, he beat Betsy till she almost died.[6][not in citation given] They had a son named Dana. The couple appeared together many times on The Ed Sullivan Show. Robert Hightower was previously married to dancer Vera-Ellen, best known as Rosemary Clooney's sister in White Christmas.

Veda Victoria (Vickie) Ross (Maggie) was born November 8, 1927, in Roscoe, Texas. She married Robert Lamouret April March 10, 1950, in Paris. She later had a second marriage to Bob Hender.

Dixie Jewel Ross (Elmira) was born August 9, 1929, in Loraine, Texas. She married on July 10, 1948, to Richard (Dickie) Henderson, OBE, (October 30, 1922 - September 22, 1985), whose father was a Music Hall comedian and singer famous for his short, rotund appearance, bowler hat, and beautiful singing voice. He was also famous for making the original recording of the popular song "Tiptoe Through the Tulips." Dixie died at age 33 on July 10, 1963 [7] and is buried in Gunnersbury Cemetery, London, England.

References

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