The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone

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The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone
Roman spring.jpg
Film poster
Directed byJosé Quintero
Produced byLouis De Rochemont
Lothar Wolff
Written byGavin Lambert
Jan Read
StarringVivien Leigh
Warren Beatty
Lotte Lenya
Jill St. John
Coral Browne
Music byRichard Addinsell
CinematographyHarry Waxman
Edited byRalph Kemplen
Production
company
Distributed byWarner-Pathé Distributors (UK)
Warner Bros. Pictures (US)
Release datesDecember 28, 1961 (1961-12-28)
Running time103 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
 
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This article is about the 1961 film. For the 2003 TV film, see The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone (2003 film).
The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone
Roman spring.jpg
Film poster
Directed byJosé Quintero
Produced byLouis De Rochemont
Lothar Wolff
Written byGavin Lambert
Jan Read
StarringVivien Leigh
Warren Beatty
Lotte Lenya
Jill St. John
Coral Browne
Music byRichard Addinsell
CinematographyHarry Waxman
Edited byRalph Kemplen
Production
company
Distributed byWarner-Pathé Distributors (UK)
Warner Bros. Pictures (US)
Release datesDecember 28, 1961 (1961-12-28)
Running time103 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone is a 1961 British film made by Seven Arts-Warner Bros.[1][2][3] It was directed by José Quintero and produced by Louis De Rochemont with Lothar Wolff as associate producer. The screenplay was written by Gavin Lambert and Jan Read and based on the novel by Tennessee Williams. The music score was by Richard Addinsell and the cinematography by Harry Waxman.

The film was the only directorial effort for José Quintero on the big screen.[4]

Plot[edit]

Karen Stone (Vivien Leigh), an acclaimed American stage actress, and her businessman husband are off on holiday to Rome. On the plane, her husband suffers a fatal heart attack. Karen decides to stay in Italy and rent a luxury apartment in Rome. The Contessa Magda Terribili-Gonzales (Lotte Lenya) soon introduces her to a young Italian man, Paolo (Warren Beatty), who is actually a highly professional gigolo. Karen and Paolo begin an affair, but it soon becomes obvious that Paolo is in it only for personal gain. He is soon bored by Mrs. Stone, and leaves her to pursue a young American film actress (Jill St. John). Ridiculed by the Contessa, chastised by her friend Meg (Coral Browne) and abandoned by Paolo, Mrs. Stone is soon utterly debased enough to surrender herself to a ragged, mysterious young man who has been following her obsessively. In the end, it seems as if Mrs. Stone has literally given up her life.

Cast[edit]

Awards and nominations[edit]

Lotte Lenya was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress.

2003 version[edit]

In 2003, an Emmy-award winning made-for-cable version was produced for Showtime Networks starring Helen Mirren, Anne Bancroft, and Olivier Martinez.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Variety". December 6, 1961. p. 6. 
  2. ^ "Harrison's Reports". November 25, 1961. p. 186. 
  3. ^ "Monthly Film Bulletin". 1962. p. 36. 
  4. ^ Erickson, Hal. "The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone (1961)". New York Times. 

External links[edit]