The O'Reilly Factor

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The O'Reilly Factor
Also known asThe O'Reilly Report
(1996-1998)
FormatPolitical Commentary
Created byBill O'Reilly
Presented byBill O'Reilly
Country of originUnited States
No. of seasons17
No. of episodes5,321
Production
Location(s)New York, New York
Running time60 minutes
Production company(s)Fox News Channel
Broadcast
Original channelFox News Channel
Picture format720p (16:9 HDTV)
480i (16:9 letterbox SDTV)
Original runOctober 7, 1996 (1996-10-07) – present
External links
Website
 
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The O'Reilly Factor
Also known asThe O'Reilly Report
(1996-1998)
FormatPolitical Commentary
Created byBill O'Reilly
Presented byBill O'Reilly
Country of originUnited States
No. of seasons17
No. of episodes5,321
Production
Location(s)New York, New York
Running time60 minutes
Production company(s)Fox News Channel
Broadcast
Original channelFox News Channel
Picture format720p (16:9 HDTV)
480i (16:9 letterbox SDTV)
Original runOctober 7, 1996 (1996-10-07) – present
External links
Website

The O'Reilly Factor, originally titled The O'Reilly Report from 1996 to 1998[1] and often called The Factor, is an American talk show on the Fox News Channel hosted by commentator Bill O'Reilly, who often discusses current controversial political issues with guests.

Format[edit]

An example of The O'Reilly Factor's Talking Points Memo

The O'Reilly Factor is usually prerecorded, though it is occasionally aired live if breaking news or special events are being covered. It is usually taped between 5:00 and 7:00 PM Eastern Time and airs weekdays at 8:00 PM and 11:00 PM. Some guests are interviewed before the "live to tape" period and are slotted in the program as appropriate.[2]

O'Reilly and his producers discuss potential topics twice a week.[3] A producer will research the story and book guests for O'Reilly, and an information packet will be produced with possible angles for O'Reilly to explore. For each show, O'Reilly, with the assistance of his staff, will produce a script with the words for the "Talking Points Memo" and "Tip of the Day" segments, and points of discussion and questions for the guests that will appear on the program. On February 2, 2009 the show launched in high definition and moved to the previous studio used by the Fox Report.

Radio talk show host Laura Ingraham is the current regular guest host, though Mike Huckabee, Juan Williams, Monica Crowley, Eric Bolling, and Greg Gutfeld have also filled in.

Segments[edit]

The show is divided into titled segments, appearing in the following general order. Not all segments appear in all programs, and occasionally segments will repeat.

Occasionally, the following segments appear:

Audience[edit]

The stage previously used as the set of The O'Reilly Factor.

Early in 2009, the show's ratings increased.[4] In July 2009, Hal Boedeker blogged that The O'Reilly Factor peaked at 3.1 million viewers which was an increase of 37% from the previous year.[5] In September 2009, The O'Reilly Factor was the #1 cable news show for 106 consecutive weeks.[6]

Guests[edit]

O'Reilly's first guest was General Barry McCaffrey, then the Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (or "Drug Czar"). Over the years, many other well-known political figures and celebrities have appeared regularly on the show.

Regular guests[edit]

2008 presidential contenders[edit]

Bill O'Reilly had tried for years to get Hillary Clinton to come on the show.[8] On April 30, 2008, Clinton agreed to come on the show as part of a pre-taped interview that would be broadcast over two days.[9][10][11][12][13]

O'Reilly also held an exclusive, four-part interview with then-presidential candidate Barack Obama.

Both interviews drew significant media attention as they were front runners for the 2008 presidential election.

Ron Paul and O'Reilly got into a testy exchange over the issue of Iran.

The 2008 Republican candidate for Vice President, Sarah Palin, and then Democratic Vice President candidate Joe Biden were also invited to the show, but chose not to make an appearance.[14]

Parodies[edit]

In 2005, The Colbert Report premiered on Comedy Central. The show, hosted by Stephen Colbert, is a satirical spoof of pundit shows like The O'Reilly Factor, spoofing its format and the mannerisms and ideology of O'Reilly, whom Colbert calls "Papa Bear." Colbert makes no secret of his spoofing O'Reilly: upon hearing the news that O'Reilly approved of The Colbert Report, he declared on-air that "I like you too. In fact, if it wasn't for you, this show wouldn't exist."[15] On January 18, 2007, Colbert appeared on The O'Reilly Factor and O'Reilly appeared on The Colbert Report.[16][17] Colbert also acknowledged having received advice from O'Reilly in private.[18]

The O'Reilly Factor has also been spoofed on Saturday Night Live, first by Jeff Richards and later on by Darrell Hammond. On MADtv it was Michael McDonald doing the honors. O'Reilly himself has appeared on MADtv.[19] Richards also played O'Reilly in an episode of Mind of Mencia where O'Reilly is a senator in the year 2016.

The show was also spoofed by the TV series The Boondocks; first in the episode "The Trial of R. Kelly" where O'Reilly is shown talking about R. Kelly's latest legal trouble. Later in "Return of the King", O'Reilly is shown attacking Martin Luther King for saying that America should "love thy enemy" and "turn the other cheek", even in respects to the 9/11 attacks. O'Reilly accuses him of hating America and tells him to "Take another 40 year nap, Commie bastard."

CNNNN, an Australian comedy show which satirized cable news, featured a recurring segment entitled The Firth Factor. These segments typically showed Charles Firth, a member of the Chaser comedy team, presenting his opinion on topical issues, often through use of over-the-top comparisons (such as dipping a paper heart in a can of black paint and claiming: "This is how black Saddam Hussein's heart is") and outrageous statements in a parody of O'Reilly and Australian current affairs personalities. The Chaser's War on Everything also featured a segment in its second season where it poked fun at the O'Reilly factor.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1] Cloapinto, John. (2004-08-11). "Mad Dog", Rolling Stone[dead link]
  2. ^ "Bill O'Reilly.com behind the scenes Q/A". 
  3. ^ "Bostonia - BU alumni quarterly". 2001. 
  4. ^ Gorman, Bill (February 6, 2009). "Obama Administration Boosts O’Reilly Factor TV Ratings". TVbytheNumbers. Retrieved May 27, 2010. 
  5. ^ Boedeker, Hal (July 28, 2009). "Fox News dominates July ratings; Bill O’Reilly again tops — and Nancy Grace makes impressive gains". Orlando Sentinel. Retrieved May 27, 2010. 
  6. ^ Ariens, Chris (September 29, 2009). "Q3 Cable Ratings: FNC Shows Fill Top 10; #3 Network on Cable; Beck Grows Timeslot 136%". WebMediaBrands Inc. Media Bistro. Retrieved May 27, 2010. 
  7. ^ Malkin, Michelle. "Michelle Malkin » Stiiiiill going". Michellemalkin.com. Retrieved 2008-11-21. 
  8. ^ By, Posted (2008-04-29). "SFGate: Politics Blog : Hillary Goes on O'Reilly Wednesday for first time!". Sfgate.com. Retrieved 2008-11-21. 
  9. ^ "Hillary Clinton, meet Bill O'Reilly | Top of the Ticket | Los Angeles Times". Latimesblogs.latimes.com. 2008-04-29. Retrieved 2008-11-21. 
  10. ^ "Chron.commons | Chron.com - Houston Chronicle". Chron.com. Retrieved 2008-11-21. 
  11. ^ Carl Macgowan. "Clinton to appear on O'Reilly show - Newsday.com". Newsday.com. Retrieved 2008-11-21. 
  12. ^ "The Hillary Factor | The Trail | washingtonpost.com". Blog.washingtonpost.com. Retrieved 2008-11-21. 
  13. ^ Rhee, Foon (2008-04-30). "Clinton's unusual political bedfellows - 2008 Presidential Campaign Blog - Political Intelligence - Boston.com". Boston.com. Retrieved 2008-11-21. 
  14. ^ Posted by Patrick. "O'Reilly: "I'm mad as hell, and I'm not acting." - mediabistro.com: FishbowlDC". Mediabistro.com. Retrieved 2008-11-21. 
  15. ^ Solomon, Deborah (2005-09-25). "Funny About the News". New York Times Magazine. Retrieved 2010-05-25. 
  16. ^ Stephen Colbert Enters the No Spin Zone. Foxnews.com Published . Last Retrieved .
  17. ^ Bill O'Reilly Pt. 1. ComedyCentral.com January 18, 2007. Last Retrieved.
  18. ^ Dowd, Maureen (November 16, 2006). "America's Anchors". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on December 27, 2006. Retrieved October 9, 2007. 
  19. ^ ""MADtv" Episode #9.17 (2004) - Full cast and crew". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved May 27, 2010. 
Preceded by
On the Record w/ Greta Van Susteren
Fox News Channel Weekday Lineup
8:00 PM –9:00 PM
Succeeded by
The Kelly File
Preceded by
Hannity
Fox News Channel Weekday Lineup
11:00 PM –12:00 PM (replay)
Succeeded by
The Kelly File (replay)

External links[edit]