The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies

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The Hobbit:
The Battle of the Five Armies
The Hobbit - The Battle of the Five Armies.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byPeter Jackson
Produced by
Screenplay by
Based onThe Hobbit 
by J. R. R. Tolkien
Starring
Music byHoward Shore
CinematographyAndrew Lesnie
Edited byJabez Olssen
Production
companies
Distributed byWarner Bros. Pictures
Release dates
  • 1 December 2014 (2014-12-01) (London premiere)
  • 11 December 2014 (2014-12-11) (New Zealand)
  • 17 December 2014 (2014-12-17) (United States)
Running time144 minutes[1]
CountryNew Zealand[2]
United States[2]
LanguageEnglish
Budget$250 million[3]
Box office$117.6 million[4]
 
  (Redirected from The Hobbit: There and Back Again)
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The Hobbit:
The Battle of the Five Armies
The Hobbit - The Battle of the Five Armies.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byPeter Jackson
Produced by
Screenplay by
Based onThe Hobbit 
by J. R. R. Tolkien
Starring
Music byHoward Shore
CinematographyAndrew Lesnie
Edited byJabez Olssen
Production
companies
Distributed byWarner Bros. Pictures
Release dates
  • 1 December 2014 (2014-12-01) (London premiere)
  • 11 December 2014 (2014-12-11) (New Zealand)
  • 17 December 2014 (2014-12-17) (United States)
Running time144 minutes[1]
CountryNew Zealand[2]
United States[2]
LanguageEnglish
Budget$250 million[3]
Box office$117.6 million[4]

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (previously known as The Hobbit: There and Back Again) is a 2014 epic fantasy adventure film, directed by Peter Jackson and written by Jackson, Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, and Guillermo del Toro. It is the final installment in the three-part film adaptation based on the novel The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien, following An Unexpected Journey (2012) and The Desolation of Smaug (2013). Produced by New Line Cinema, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and WingNut Films, and distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures, The Battle of the Five Armies was released in New Zealand on 11 December 2014 and will be released on 17 December 2014 in the United States. It stars Martin Freeman, Ian McKellen, Richard Armitage, Evangeline Lilly, Lee Pace, Luke Evans, Benedict Cumberbatch, Ken Stott and James Nesbitt. It also features Cate Blanchett, Ian Holm, Christopher Lee, Hugo Weaving and Orlando Bloom.

Plot[edit]

Bilbo Baggins, Thorin Oakenshield, and his fellow Dwarves watch in despair from the Lonely Mountain as the dragon Smaug lays waste to Laketown for their association with the intruders. Bard breaks out of imprisonment and, with help from his son Bain, uses a black arrow against Smaug. The dragon screams in pain before dying and plunges down into Laketown, destroying the ship carrying the town's Master and gold supplies in the process. After being made new leader by the surviving residents of Laketown, Bard decides they will take residence in Dale. Kili confides his love for Tauriel before he and the other Dwarves reunite with their company at the Lonely Mountain. Inside, Thorin has developed "dragon sickness" while scouring the gold for the Arkenstone. Bilbo, having carried the Arkenstone in his possession all along, agrees with a troubled Balin that it should remain kept away from Thorin. The maddened Thorin commands the dwarves to build a blockade at the entrance of Erebor.

Meanwhile, Galadriel and the other White Council members rescue Gandalf from Dol Guldur. As Radagast evacuates him, Elrond and Saruman hold off the Nazgûl. Sauron appears and tries to tempt Galadriel, but she is able to cast him and the Nazgûl away from the fortress. Though Elrond believes they must warn the Free People of the enemy's return, Saruman tells him to take the weakened Galadriel to safety while he deals with Sauron.

Azog, marching on Erebor with his vast Orc army, learns from Bolg that an Elf army under Thranduil is also approaching. Azog consequently sends Bolg to Gundabad, to lead their remaining forces. Following Bolg to the fortress of Gundabad, Legolas and Tauriel witness the march of a second massive Orc army and hundreds of war-bred bats.

When Thranduil’s army arrives in Dale, he forges an allegiance with Bard to claim the necklace of white gems from Thorin's treasure. Though Bard attempts to reason with Thorin to avoid further bloodshed, the Dwarf refuses to share any of the treasure, much to his company's dismay. After Gandalf arrives at Dale, Bilbo sneaks out of Erebor to hand the Arkenstone over to Thranduil and Bard. The next day, Bard and Thranduil's army gather at the gates of Erebor, offering to trade the Arkenstone to Thorin for gold. An infuriated Thorin tries to harm Bilbo for his betrayal, but is persuaded by Gandalf into letting him go. Thorin once again declines Bard's peace offer when his cousin Dain Ironfoot II along with an armored Dwarf company arrives. The Dwarves get ready to attack the Elves when Azog's army makes its appearance, converging on the Dwarves and the city of Dale. With the Orcs outnumbering Dain's army, Thranduil's forces join the battle. Thranduil, Bard, Bilbo and Gandalf assist in the defense of Dale.

Inside Erebor, Thorin eventually overcomes his madness. While the others aid what remains of Dain's forces, Thorin rides towards Ravenhill with Dwalin, Fili, and Kili to face Azog.

Realizing Thorin is walking into a trap, and with no care from Thranduil, Tauriel and Legolas set off to Ravenhill with Bilbo following to warn the Dwarves of Bolg's incoming Orc army. On Ravenhill, Azog ambushes the Dwarves and ruthlessly kills Fili. Bilbo ends up being knocked unconscious as Thorin battles Azog and Kili dies protecting Tauriel from Bolg. Legolas eventually kills Bolg and Thorin manages to kill Azog, but the fight leaves him mortally wounded.

The Battle of the Five Armies comes to an end when the Great Eagles - carrying with them Radagast and Beorn - arrive and overrun the Orcs.

In the aftermath of the battle, Bilbo and Thorin make peace before Thorin dies from his wounds. A disillusioned Legolas leaves his father to meet up with one of the Dunedain and a heartbroken Tauriel cries over Kili. Bilbo bids farewell to the remaining members of Thorin's company and returns to the Shire with Gandalf. As the two part on the outskirts of the Shire, Gandalf admits to his knowledge of Bilbo having the Ring and, although he does not know its true nature, provides Bilbo with a word of caution. Bilbo's story ends when he returns to Bag End and finds the Sackville-Bagginses are auctioning off his belongings. The scene transitions to Bilbo on the day of his 111th birthday when he receives a visit from an old friend, Gandalf.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

The Hobbit was originally envisioned as a two-part film, but Jackson confirmed plans for a third film on 30 July 2012, turning his adaptation of The Hobbit into a trilogy.[8][9] According to Jackson, the third film would contain the Battle of the Five Armies and make extensive use of the appendices that Tolkien wrote to expand the story of Middle-Earth (published in the back of The Return of the King). Jackson also stated that while the third film will largely make use of footage originally shot for the first and second films, it would require additional filming as well.[10] The third film was titled There and Back Again in August 2012.[11] In April 2014, Jackson changed the title of the film to The Battle of the Five Armies as he thought the new title better suited the situation of the film.[12] He stated on his Facebook page, "There and Back Again felt like the right name for the second of a two film telling of the quest to reclaim Erebor, when Bilbo’s arrival there, and departure, were both contained within the second film. But with three movies, it suddenly felt misplaced—after all, Bilbo has already arrived “there” in the Desolation of Smaug."[13] Shaun Gunner, the chairman of The Tolkien Society, supported the decision: "‘The Battle of the Five Armies’ much better captures the focus of the film but also more accurately channels the essence of the story."[14]

Score[edit]

As with all the previous films, Howard Shore has composed the score. Billy Boyd, who played Peregrin Took in The Lord of the Rings, wrote and recorded the song "The Last Goodbye" to be played over the end credits of the film.[15]

Release[edit]

Marketing[edit]

Smaug (voiced by Cumberbatch himself) being interviewed by Stephen Colbert in The Colbert Report, December 2014

A teaser trailer for the film was released on 28 July 2014 attached to Guardians of the Galaxy, Into the Storm, and If I Stay. The second theatrical trailer was released on 6 November 2014 attached to Interstellar and The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1.[16][17]

To promote the film's release, Wellington-based association football club, Wellington Phoenix, will wear a special designed jersey to commemorate the opening of The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies. The custom, film-themed jersey will only be worn once on 13 December 2014.[18] In the film's Japanese release in December 13, Warner Brothers collaborated with mobile gaming company A-Lim to bring Bilbo Baggins, Gandalf and Legolas into the game Brave Frontier at the end of December as Vortex Dungeon units. The campaign only runs until February 2015.[19][20][21]

Smaug made a guest appearance on the satire show The Colbert Report on December 12, 2014 to promote the film. Cumberbatch, who voiced the dragon in Peter Jackson's films, also provided the voice of the dragon for the interview with self-confessed Tolkien fan Stephen Colbert. WETA was also responsible for its animation.[22]

Theatrical release[edit]

The film opened on 11 December in New Zealand and on 12 December in the United Kingdom. Warner Bros will distribute the film on 17 December 2014 in the United States, on 18 December 2014 in Greece and 26 December 2014 in Australia.[6][23] The film's première was held in London at Leicester Square on 1 December 2014.[24][25] The film is scheduled to be released in China on January 23, 2015.[26]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

The film reached a milestone of $100 million in 5 days.[27]

Other territories[edit]

The film was released on December 10, 2014 in 11 European markets and on December 11, 2014 in 17 additional markets and grossed $11.3 million and $13.7 million respectively for a two day total of $26.6 million as well as topping the charts in each of the territories.[28][29][30]

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies was released internationally on more than 15,395 screens.[27] In its opening weekend of release overseas, the film performed extremely well earning $122.2 million from 37 markets (including the revenue it earned from it's first two day of release)[31] topping the box office and outperformed the previous two installments on a local currency and admissions basis.[27] However, the overseas opening weekend was still lower than the openings of An Unexpected Journey ($138 million)[32] and The Desolation of Smaug ($135.4 million).[33] (both on a dollar basis). It set a record for the biggest December IMAX opening with $6.4 million across 160 IMAX screens. (previously held by An Unexpected Journey with $5.03 million).[27] Among the notable territories, Germany accounted for $20.5 million, the UK contributed $15.2 million, France added $15.05 million, and Russia amassed $13.75 million, ranking as the biggest Warner Bros. opening ever in the country.[34]

Critical response[edit]

The Battle of the Five Armies panel at 2014 San Diego Comic-Con International

MTV reported that reviews for The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies have been "generally positive" with critics praising the film "for its energy, shorter running time and satisfying closure."[35] According to IBT reviews for the film have been positive, with critics "praising director Peter Jackson's effort at transforming J.R.R Tolkien's fantasy novel into an epic adventure film trilogy."[36] The review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes reported a 71% approval rating, based on 55 reviews, with an average score of 6.8/10. The site's consensus reads: "Suitably grim, epic, and action-packed, The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies ends Peter Jackson's second Middle-earth trilogy on a rousing high note."[37] The film also holds a Metacritic score of 62 out of 100 based on 13 collocated reviews, indicating "generally favorable reviews."[38]

Scott Foundas of Variety said, "The result is at once the trilogy's most engrossing episode, its most expeditious (at a comparatively lean 144 minutes) and also its darkest - both visually and in terms of the forces that stir in the hearts of men, dwarves and orcs alike."[39] Todd McCarthy of The Hollywood Reporter said, "After six films, 13 years and 1031 minutes of accumulated running time, Peter Jackson has concluded his massively remunerative genuflection at the altar of J.R.R. Tolkien with a film that may be the most purely entertaining of any in the collection."[40] Andrew Pulver of The Guardian said, "This film is a fitting cap to an extended series that, if nothing else, has transformed Tolkien's place in the wider culture."[41] Chris Tilly from IGN Movies said, "There’s a little too much padding in the final Hobbit flick, and the best sequence is without doubt the film’s first. But the central battle is indeed spectacular, and as ‘The Age of Orc’ approaches, it rounds out this particular story in stirring and emotional fashion."[42]

Conversely, Inkoo Kang of The Wrap said, "The 144-minute running time showcases Jackson's worst tendencies: eons-long battle scenes, sloppy and abrupt resolutions, portentous romances, off-rhythm comic timing, and, newly in this case, patience-testing fan service."[43] Tim Robey of the The Daily Telegraph described the film as "a paragraph on steroids" that was "neither very terrible nor remotely unexpected. It's a series of stomping footnotes in search of a climax."[44] The BBC's Nicholas Barber wrote that with the Hobbit series Jackson had succeeded in bridging the gap between The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, and that The Battle of the Five Armies was a "colossal technical achievement", but he also criticised that the film as such was not compelling because of its repetitive battle scenes and a lack of plot.[45]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF THE FIVE ARMIES (12A)". British Board of Film Classification. 28 November 2014. Retrieved 28 November 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "The Hobbit The Battle of the Five Armies (2014)". British Film Institute. Retrieved 13 December 2014. 
  3. ^ "Reese Witherspoon Isn’t Nice or Wholesome in Wild, and That’s What Makes It Great". Time. Time. Retrieved 9 December 2014. 
  4. ^ "The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved December 14, 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c Skipper, Ben (24 April 2014). "Hobbit Finale Renamed The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies". International Business Times. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c d O'Hara, Helen (24 April 2014). "The Third Hobbit Is Now Subtitled The Battle Of The Five Armies". Empire. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
  7. ^ http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0538692/?ref_=nv_sr_1
  8. ^ Jordan, Zakarin (30 July 2012). "Third 'Hobbit' Film Confirmed". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 30 July 2012. 
  9. ^ Jackson, Peter (30 July 2012). "An unexpected journey". Facebook. Retrieved 30 July 2012. 
  10. ^ Outlaw, Kofi (24 July 2012). "'The Hobbit 3' Edges Closer to Production". ScreenRant. Retrieved 24 July 2012. 
  11. ^ McClintock, Pamela (31 August 2012). "Third 'Hobbit' Film Sets Release Date". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 31 August 2012. 
  12. ^ Child, Ben (24 April 2014). "Peter Jackson retitles The Hobbit part three The Battle of the Five Armies". The Guardian. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
  13. ^ Hewett, Emily (24 April 2014). "The Hobbit 3 gets awesome new title Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies". Metro. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
  14. ^ Gunner, Shaun (28 April 2014). "The Battle of the Five Armies is the right name for the third Hobbit film". The Tolkien Society. Retrieved 26 May 2014. 
  15. ^ "Our final trip to Middle-earth to finish with "The Last Goodbye" sung by Billy Boyd". TheOneRing.net. 20 October 2014. Retrieved 20 October 2014. 
  16. ^ "Battle of the five armies trailer released". Guardian. 29 July 2014. Retrieved 3 November 2014. 
  17. ^ "Frame by Frame Analysis of The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies Teaser Trailer – July 28th 2014". The One Ring. 29 July 2014. Retrieved 3 November 2014. 
  18. ^ "Phoenix joins forces with The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies". wellingtonphoenix.com. Retrieved 7 December 2014. 
  19. ^ ""Brave Frontier" Mixes It Up with "The Hobbit" and Adds Bilbo Baggins". Crunchyroll. Retrieved 15 December 2014. 
  20. ^ "Bilbo Baggins Makes A Cameo In Brave Frontier". Siliconera. Retrieved 15 December 2014. 
  21. ^ "Bilbo Baggins to Appear in Brave Frontier Mobile Game". Anime News Network. Retrieved 15 December 2014. 
  22. ^ "Smaug". The Colbert Report. Retrieved 12 December 2014. .
  23. ^ McIntyre, Gina (24 April 2014). "Peter Jackson renames ‘Hobbit’ finale: ‘Battle of the Five Armies’". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 22 May 2014. 
  24. ^ "World premiere for "The Hobbit: Battle of the Five Armies" in London on December 1". The One Ring. 29 October 2014. Retrieved 28 November 2014. 
  25. ^ "We’ve got you covered for ‘The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies’ world premiere!". The One Ring. 1 December 2014. Retrieved 2 December 2014. 
  26. ^ Clifford Coonan (December 11, 2014). "'Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1' China Release Pushed Back Again to February 2015". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved December 13, 2014. 
  27. ^ a b c d Nancy Tartaglione (December 14, 2014). "Hobbit’ Rings Up $117.6M Debut, Sets IMAX Record; More Intl Box Office". Deadline.com. Retrieved December 15, 2014. 
  28. ^ Anthony D'Alessandro (December 11, 2014). "‘Five Armies’ Seizes A Precious $11.3M In First Day Abroad". Deadline.com. Retrieved December 12, 2014. 
  29. ^ Pamela McClintock (December 11, 2014). "Box Office: 'Hobbit: Five Armies' Opening to Huge Numbers Overseas". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved December 12, 2014. 
  30. ^ Anthony D'Alessandro (December 12, 2014). "‘Hobbit’ Plants $26.6M Two-Day Footprint On International Box Office". Deadline.com. Retrieved December 13, 2014. 
  31. ^ Ray Subers (December 14, 2014). "Around-the-World Roundup: 'Hobbit' Finale Opens to $122 Million Overseas". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved December 15, 2014. 
  32. ^ Ray Subers (December 18, 2012). "Around-the-World Roundup: 'The Hobbit' Collects $138 Million Overseas". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved December 15, 2014. 
  33. ^ Nancy Tartaglione (December 16, 2013). "UPDATE: Overseas Box Office: ‘The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug’ Bests 1st Pic; ‘Gravity’ Pulls In Japan; ‘Frozen’ Melts Russia". Deadline.com. Retrieved December 15, 2014. 
  34. ^ Brent Lang (December 14, 2014). "‘Hobbit: Battle of Five Armies’ Rules Foreign Box Office With $117.6 Million". Variety. Retrieved December 15, 2014. 
  35. ^ Sullivan, Kevin P. (December 2, 2014). "Early The Hobbit: The Battle Of Five Armies Reviews Are Here". MTV. Retrieved 4 December 2014. 
  36. ^ Mathew, Ilin (4 December 2014). "The Battle of the Five Armies Review Round-up: The Hobbit Manages to Impress Critics". International Business Times. Retrieved December 4, 2014. 
  37. ^ "The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies". Rotten Tomatoes. Flixster. Retrieved 14 December 2014. 
  38. ^ "The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 4 December 2014. 
  39. ^ Foundas, Scott (December 1, 2014). "Film Review: ‘The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies’". Variety. Retrieved December 4, 2014. 
  40. ^ McCarthy, Todd (December 1, 2014). "'The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies': Film Review". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved December 4, 2014. 
  41. ^ Pulver, Andrew (December 2, 2014). "The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies review - exactly what it promised to be". The Guardian. Retrieved December 4, 2014. 
  42. ^ Tilly, Chris (December 1, 2014). "Film Review: ‘The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies’". IGN. Retrieved December 4, 2014. 
  43. ^ Kang, Inkoo (December 1, 2014). "‘The Hobbit: Battle of the Five Armies’ Review: Martin Freeman and Company End Trilogy, Provide Fan Service". The Wrap. Retrieved December 4, 2014. 
  44. ^ Robey, Tim (1 December 2014). The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies, first look review: 'begs not to exist.'" Telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved 5 December 2014.
  45. ^ Barber, Nicholas (12 December 2014). "Is the final Hobbit film a flop?". BBC. Retrieved 14 December 2014. 

External links[edit]