The Gang's All Here (1943 film)

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The Gang's All Here

Theatrical release poster
Directed byBusby Berkeley
Produced byWilliam Goetz
William LeBaron
Written byWalter Bullock
Nancy Wintner
George Root Jr.
Tom Bridges
StarringAlice Faye
Carmen Miranda
Music byLeo Robin
Harry Warren
CinematographyEdward Cronjager
Editing byRay Curtiss
Distributed by20th Century Fox
Release date(s)December 24, 1943 (1943-12-24)
Running time103 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
 
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The Gang's All Here

Theatrical release poster
Directed byBusby Berkeley
Produced byWilliam Goetz
William LeBaron
Written byWalter Bullock
Nancy Wintner
George Root Jr.
Tom Bridges
StarringAlice Faye
Carmen Miranda
Music byLeo Robin
Harry Warren
CinematographyEdward Cronjager
Editing byRay Curtiss
Distributed by20th Century Fox
Release date(s)December 24, 1943 (1943-12-24)
Running time103 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

The Gang's All Here is a 1943 American Twentieth Century Fox Technicolor musical film starring Alice Faye, James Ellison, and Carmen Miranda in a story about a soldier and a nightclub singer. The film, directed and choreographed by Busby Berkeley, is considered a camp classic. One reviewer described it as "like a male hairdresser's acid trip"[1] for its use of musical numbers with fruit hats.

Musical highlights include Carmen Miranda performing an insinuating, witty version of "You Discover You're in New York" that lampoons fads, fashions, and wartime shortages of the time. The film is also memorable for Miranda's "The Lady in the Tutti Frutti Hat", which because of its sexual innuendo (dozens of scantily clad women handling very large bananas), prevented the film from being shown in Miranda's native Portugal in its initial release.[1][2] Even in the US the censors dictated that the chorus girls must hold the bananas at the waist and not at the hip. Alice Faye sings "A Journey to a Star," "No Love, No Nothin'," and the surreal finale "The Polka-Dot Polka."

The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Art Direction-Interior Decoration, Color (James Basevi, Joseph C. Wright, Thomas Little).[3] It was the last musical Faye made as a Hollywood superstar. She was pregnant with her second daughter during filming.[4]

Contents

Plot and cast

The film follows the typical "boy-meets-girl" formula of musical comedy. A young soldier, Sgt. Andy Mason (James Ellison) meets Eadie Allen (Alice Faye), a New York City nightclub singer. The two fall in love. Unbeknownst to Eadie, Andy is unofficially engaged to long-time friend Vivian Potter (Sheila Ryan). Andy goes to war and returns a hero. His father (Eugene Pallette) arranges to have Eadie and her fellow nightclub performers (Carmen Miranda, Benny Goodman, Phil Baker, and dancer Tony DeMarco) appear in a war-bond drive at the estate of Vivian's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Peyton Potter (Charlotte Greenwood and Edward Everett Horton). It is during rehearsals that Eadie learns the truth about Andy's relationship with Vivian. The clouds vanish and the lovers unite when Vivian decides she wants a career as a dancer rather than marriage. The film ends with everyone living happily ever after.

Noted drummer Louie Bellson appears uncredited in the Benny Goodman Orchestra while Carmen Miranda sings "Paducah".[5]

Cast

DVD release

Fox released the film on a digitally remastered DVD in February 2007 as part of "The Alice Faye Collection." This DVD was criticized for its faded color reproduction that subdued the original vibrant Technicolor hues.[6] The film was released on DVD a second time in June 2008 as part of Fox's "The Carmen Miranda Collection." The 2008 DVD release contained a brighter and more colorful transfer.[7] A laserdisc version was released in 1997 by Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment but was quickly pulled and is now a highly valued collector's item. Privately made copies in all formats are circulated among collectors. The film is occasionally shown on American television.

References

External links