The Cape (2011 TV series)

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The Cape
The Cape 2011 Intertitle.png
GenreSuperhero
Drama
Action/Adventure
Created byTom Wheeler
Starring
Composer(s)Bear McCreary
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons1
No. of episodes10 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s)
Producer(s)Peter Chomsky
Editor(s)Casey Brown
CinematographyJohn Newby
Running time45 minutes
Production company(s)
Broadcast
Original channelNBC
Picture format1080i
Original runJanuary 9 – March 11, 2011 (2011-03-11)
External links
Website
 
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The Cape
The Cape 2011 Intertitle.png
GenreSuperhero
Drama
Action/Adventure
Created byTom Wheeler
Starring
Composer(s)Bear McCreary
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons1
No. of episodes10 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s)
Producer(s)Peter Chomsky
Editor(s)Casey Brown
CinematographyJohn Newby
Running time45 minutes
Production company(s)
Broadcast
Original channelNBC
Picture format1080i
Original runJanuary 9 – March 11, 2011 (2011-03-11)
External links
Website

The Cape is an American superhero drama series. It premiered on NBC during the 2010–2011 television season as a mid-season replacement[1] beginning with a two-hour pilot episode on Sunday, January 9, 2011 at 9 pm Eastern and Pacific Time. An encore played on Monday, January 10, with follow-up episodes continuing on Monday evenings in the 9 pm timeslot beginning on January 17.[2] NBC subsequently cut the total number of episodes to be aired from 13 to 10 as a result of low ratings.[3] On March 2, 2011, NBC announced that the series finale would be aired only on the network's website.[4]

Plot[edit]

The series, set in fictional Palm City, CA, follows Vince Faraday, an honest detective who decides to leave the police force after he witnesses the murder of a new police chief by a mysterious individual known as "Chess". Faraday accepts an offer to work for a private security firm named ARK, owned and operated by billionaire entrepreneur Peter Fleming. ARK is petitioning Palm City to privatize the police and public safety operations.

A video streamed to Faraday from an investigative blogger known only as "Orwell" leads him and his partner, Marty Voyt, to a cargo train owned by Fleming's firm. They discover the train is smuggling implosive WMDs inside children's toys. Unfortunately, Voyt set up Faraday and delivers him to "Chess", who is Fleming, the CEO of ARK. Fleming frames Faraday for the police chief's murder and after securing the Chess mask onto Faraday, sends his security team after him while televised by News channels ending with a tanker explosion and Faraday's apparent death as Chess.

The entire city (including Faraday's family) now believes Faraday is "Chess" and has perished in the explosion. Faraday is abducted, but then becomes accepted, by "The Carnival of Crime", a traveling circus turned bank robbery ring. Their ring leader, Max Malini, trains Faraday in circuscraft in order to use a special black cape made entirely from spider silk, for defense against his intended foes. Max convinces Faraday not to reveal his identity, as this would endanger his wife and son. He then decides to fight Palm City's corruption and clear his name by adopting the visage of his son's favorite comic book hero, The Cape.

In the series finale, "Endgame", Faraday exposes ARK's corruption. Fleming, however, asserts that he is innocent and uses Voyt, the chief of his private police force, as a fall guy for the corporation. When Vince Faraday's wife Dana takes Voyt's case and convinces him to turn state's evidence, Vince takes his family and Voyt's into hiding to save them from assassins hired by ARK. Meanwhile, Scales locates the carnival and Voyt jumps in front of Faraday to save him, getting shot twice in the chest. As Voyt dies in Faraday's arms, Faraday removes his hood (though still masked) and forgives him for the betrayal, agreeing to care for his family. Though Voyt is redeemed in Faraday's eyes, Fleming leads the entire city to believe that he was corrupt. The series ends with Fleming still at large and Vince's family still believing him to be dead, though Orwell assures Dana that Vince loves her in the present tense (suggesting to Dana that he is still alive).

Cast and characters[edit]

Main[edit]

Recurring[edit]

Guest stars[edit]

Reception[edit]

The Cape has generated mixed reviews from critics,[5] scoring a 54 out of 100 on Metacritic.[6] Critic Ken Tucker described the show's premiere as "fun, refreshingly free of irony" with "a sensibility that allowed for a sense of humor without slipping into tiresome campiness."[7] Other proponents of the show have said "if the premise sounds cheesy or busy, the execution is crisp and efficient"[8] and "someone in network land has learned a lesson from Heroes."[9] At the same time, Matt Zoller Seitz criticized the series pilot for failing to develop its narrative effectively. While having no complaints about the premise of the series, he wrote that the pilot "rushes through everything, pulverizing potentially engaging characters and story until the whole production starts to feel like a long trailer for itself."[10] Peter Swanson of Slate wrote that the series "falls into a wasteland of its own making, where neither the stakes nor the jokes can distract one from the thinness of its writing."[11]

The special Sunday two hour debut of the show garnered a 2.6 in the key 18–49 demographic.[12] It placed third overall in terms of top science fiction genre network premieres for the 2010–2011 season, behind fellow NBC show The Event and ABC's No Ordinary Family.[13] However, for its first non-repeat airing in its official Monday timeslot the show had dropped 31% to a 1.8 rating,[14] with the next two episodes recording a 1.6[15] and a 1.5[16] respectively.

The Cape was nominated for a 2011 Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Prosthetic Makeup For A Series, Miniseries, Movie Or A Special for the character of Razer.[17]

Web comic[edit]

As they did earlier with Heroes,[18] NBC released webcomics to supplement The Cape on the official website.[19]

Popular culture[edit]

The Cape was referenced heavily in the fellow NBC series Community, mainly by the character Abed Nadir (Danny Pudi), who is obsessed with movies and TV. The Cape is his main focus in the season 2 episode "Paradigms of Human Memory", in which Abed dresses like Vince and runs around school. In one scene (still in costume) Abed swipes Jeff's (Joel McHale) food off the table and runs away. Jeff angrily declares "Show's gonna last three weeks," to which Abed replies, "Six seasons and a movie!"[20] After Community was removed from NBC's schedule in December 2011 and October 2012, fans used the hashtag "#SixSeasonsAndAMovie" to show their support for the show (Community, not The Cape) on many social media networks.

On January 15, 2011, Saturday Night Live premiered a skit spoofing The Cape. The premise of the sketch was promotional ads for "new" NBC series: The Scarf, The Bolo Tie, The Scrunchie, The Spanx, etc.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "NBC Unveils 2010–11 Primetime Schedule Accented by Five New Comedies, Seven New Dramas and New Alternative Program". The Futon Critic (NBC). May 16, 2010. Retrieved May 16, 2010. 
  2. ^ "The Cape (NBC) Listings". The Futon Critic. December 26, 2010. Retrieved December 26, 2010. 
  3. ^ NBC cuts back order for the cape
  4. ^ "The Cape is Dead – NBC Continues to Cancel Monday Night Fan Boy Favorites". TVLine. March 2, 2011. Retrieved March 2, 2011. 
  5. ^ Hinmah, Michael (January 9, 2011). "'The Cape' Debuts To Not-So-Stellar Reviews". Airlock Alpha. Retrieved January 17, 2011. 
  6. ^ "The Cape – Season 1". Metacriticmetacritic.com. Retrieved January 17, 2011. 
  7. ^ Shaw, Jessica (January 9, 2011). "'The Cape' premiere review: Will you commit to this new super-hero saga? | Ken Tucker's TV | EW.com". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved March 24, 2012. 
  8. ^ Lowry, Brian (January 6, 2011). "The Cape". Variety. 
  9. ^ Bellafante, Ginia (January 6, 2011). "David Lyons to the Rescue in ‘The Cape' on NBC". The New York Times. 
  10. ^ Seitz, Matt. ""The Cape": Why can't TV do superheroes?". Salon.com. 
  11. ^ Swanson, Peter. "The Cape: Season One". Slate. 
  12. ^ "Sunday Final Ratings: ‘Desperate Housewives,’ ‘Cleveland’ Adjusted Up; ‘Brothers & Sisters’ Down; No Change for ‘The Cape’ or ‘Bob’s Burgers’ – Ratings | TVbytheNumbers". Tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com. January 11, 2011. Retrieved March 24, 2012. 
  13. ^ Hinmah, Michael (January 10, 2011). "For NBC, 'The Cape' Premiere Not Too Shabby". Airlock Alpha. Retrieved January 17, 2011. 
  14. ^ "Monday Final Ratings: ‘Chuck’ Adjusted Up To A Season High, ‘Harry’s Law,’ ‘Rules’ Also Up; ‘House,’ ‘Mike & Molly’ Down – Ratings | TVbytheNumbers". Tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com. January 19, 2011. Retrieved March 24, 2012. 
  15. ^ Seidman, Robert (January 25, 2011). "Monday Final Ratings: 'Chuck' Drops, But Only a Little; No Change for 'Lie To Me' or 'Castle'". Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  16. ^ Gorman, Bill (February 1, 2011). "Monday Final Ratings: No Adjustments For 'Chuck,' 'Lie To Me,' 'The Cape' Or Any Other Original Episodes". Retrieved February 2, 2011. 
  17. ^ "The Cape". Emmys.com. Retrieved December 26, 2011. 
  18. ^ "Heroes Comics". NBC.com. Retrieved February 13, 2011. 
  19. ^ "The Cape – Web Exclusive – Graphic Novel". NBC.com. Retrieved February 13, 2011. 
  20. ^ Memorable quotes for Community "Paradigms of Human Memory" (2011), IMDb

External links[edit]