Tewksbury Township, New Jersey

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Tewksbury Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Tewksbury
Oldwick General Store
Oldwick General Store
Map of Tewksbury Township in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Tewksbury Township in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Tewksbury Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Tewksbury Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°41′27″N 74°46′19″W / 40.690862°N 74.772045°W / 40.690862; -74.772045Coordinates: 40°41′27″N 74°46′19″W / 40.690862°N 74.772045°W / 40.690862; -74.772045[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyHunterdon
IncorporatedFebruary 21, 1798
Named forTewkesbury, England
Government[5]
 • TypeTownship
 • MayorShaun C. Van Doren (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • AdministratorJess Landon[4]
 • ClerkRoberta Brassard[4]
Area[2]
 • Total31.699 sq mi (82.101 km2)
 • Land31.526 sq mi (81.653 km2)
 • Water0.173 sq mi (0.448 km2)  0.55%
Area rank81st of 566 in state
6th of 26 in county[2]
Elevation[6]751 ft (229 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total5,993
 • Estimate (2013)[10]5,943
 • Rank345th of 566 in state
5th of 26 in county[11]
 • Density190.1/sq mi (73.4/km2)
 • Density rank512th of 566 in state
20th of 26 in county[11]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code07830 - Califon[12]
Area code(s)908[13]
FIPS code3401972510[14][2][15]
GNIS feature ID0882190[16][2]
Websitewww.tewksburytwp.net
 
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Tewksbury Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Tewksbury
Oldwick General Store
Oldwick General Store
Map of Tewksbury Township in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Tewksbury Township in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Tewksbury Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Tewksbury Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°41′27″N 74°46′19″W / 40.690862°N 74.772045°W / 40.690862; -74.772045Coordinates: 40°41′27″N 74°46′19″W / 40.690862°N 74.772045°W / 40.690862; -74.772045[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyHunterdon
IncorporatedFebruary 21, 1798
Named forTewkesbury, England
Government[5]
 • TypeTownship
 • MayorShaun C. Van Doren (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • AdministratorJess Landon[4]
 • ClerkRoberta Brassard[4]
Area[2]
 • Total31.699 sq mi (82.101 km2)
 • Land31.526 sq mi (81.653 km2)
 • Water0.173 sq mi (0.448 km2)  0.55%
Area rank81st of 566 in state
6th of 26 in county[2]
Elevation[6]751 ft (229 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total5,993
 • Estimate (2013)[10]5,943
 • Rank345th of 566 in state
5th of 26 in county[11]
 • Density190.1/sq mi (73.4/km2)
 • Density rank512th of 566 in state
20th of 26 in county[11]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code07830 - Califon[12]
Area code(s)908[13]
FIPS code3401972510[14][2][15]
GNIS feature ID0882190[16][2]
Websitewww.tewksburytwp.net

Tewksbury Township is a township located in Hunterdon County, New Jersey and is located within the New York Metropolitan Area. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 5,993,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 452 (+8.2%) from the 5,541 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 738 (+15.4%) from the 4,803 counted in the 1990 Census.[17] The township is named after Tewkesbury, England, and the two established a sister city relationship in 2003.[18]

The township was first mentioned as holding a township meeting on March 11, 1755, as having been formed partly from Lebanon Township, though the exact circumstances of its formation by charter are unknown. Tewksbury was incorporated as one of New Jersey's initial 104 townships by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township have been take to form Califon borough (April 2, 1898). Portions of the township were acquired from Readington Township in 1832 and 1861, and portions were transferred to Clinton Township in 1871 and 1891.[19]

The original settlers were of English extraction. However, a large German contingent settled in the area around 1749 and theirs became the strongest influence when Tewksbury became a township. The enclave of Oldwick, with a mixture of Victorian, Federal, New England and Georgian style homes is protected by historic legislation. Zion Lutheran Church in Oldwick (formerly New Germantown) is the oldest German Lutheran parish in New Jersey.[20]

Oldwick is home to Mane Stream, a Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship (PATH) Premier Accredited Center for therapeutic horseback riding.[21]

Geography[edit]

Tewksbury Township is located at 40°41′27″N 74°46′19″W / 40.690862°N 74.772045°W / 40.690862; -74.772045 (40.690862,-74.772045). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 31.699 square miles (82.101 km2), of which, 31.526 square miles (81.653 km2) of it is land and 0.173 square miles (0.448 km2) of it (0.55%) is water.[1][2]

The township includes the communities of Cokesbury, Mountainville, Oldwick and Pottersville.

Oldwick Center

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
18101,308
18201,49013.9%
18301,65911.3%
18401,94417.2%
18502,30118.4%
18602,3331.4%
18702,327−0.3%
18802,108−9.4%
18902,034−3.5%
19001,883*−7.4%
19101,742−7.5%
19201,279−26.6%
19301,119−12.5%
19401,2007.2%
19501,43919.9%
19601,90832.6%
19702,95955.1%
19804,09438.4%
19904,80317.3%
20005,54115.4%
20105,9938.2%
Est. 20135,943[10]"−0.8%
Population sources:
1810-1920[22] 1840[23]
1850-1870[24] 1850[25] 1870[26]
1880-1890[27] 1890-1910[28]
1910-1930[29] 1930-1990[30]
2000[31][32] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[19]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 5,993 people, 2,189 households, and 1,769 families residing in the township. The population density was 190.1 per square mile (73.4 /km2). There were 2,323 housing units at an average density of 73.7 per square mile (28.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 94.16% (5,643) White, 0.83% (50) Black or African American, 0.03% (2) Native American, 2.92% (175) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.82% (49) from other races, and 1.23% (74) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.49% (209) of the population.[7]

There were 2,189 households, of which 34.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 73.0% were married couples living together, 5.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.2% were non-families. 15.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.05.[7]

In the township, 25.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.7% from 18 to 24, 15.2% from 25 to 44, 38.5% from 45 to 64, and 16.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47.3 years. For every 100 females there were 97.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.7 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $160,224 (with a margin of error of +/- $13,609) and the median family income was $189,833 (+/- $21,901). Males had a median income of $128,177 (+/- $22,406) versus $90,833 (+/- $32,868) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $91,644 (+/- $13,544). About 0.9% of families and 1.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.3% of those under age 18 and 1.9% of those age 65 or over.[33]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 5,541 people, 1,986 households, and 1,662 families residing in the township. The population density was 175.2 people per square mile (67.6/km2). There were 2,052 housing units at an average density of 64.9 per square mile (25.0/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 96.82% White, 0.52% African American, 1.88% Asian, 0.27% from other races, and 0.51% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.53% of the population.[31][32]

There were 1,996 households out of which 36.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 77.2% were married couples living together, 5.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.3% were non-families. 12.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.05.[31][32]

In the township the population was spread out with 26.2% under the age of 18, 3.6% from 18 to 24, 25.2% from 25 to 44, 33.7% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.7 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the township was $135,649, and the median income for a family was $150,189. Males had a median income of $100,000 versus $57,500 for females. The per capita income for the township was $65,470. About 1.6% of families and 2.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.9% of those under age 18 and 1.5% of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Tewksbury Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[5] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2014, members of the Tewksbury Township Committee are Mayor Shaun C. Van Doren (R, 2014), Deputy Mayor William Voyce (R, 2016), Dana Desiderio (R, 2015), Louis DiMare (R, 2016) and Peter Melick (R, 2015).[3][34][20][35][36]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Tewksbury Township is located in the 7th Congressional District[37] and is part of New Jersey's 23rd state legislative district.[8][38][39] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Tewksbury Township had been in the 24th state legislative district.[40]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[41] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[42][43] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[44][45]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 23rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Michael J. Doherty (R, Washington Township, Warren County) and in the General Assembly by John DiMaio (R, Hackettstown) and Erik Peterson (R, Franklin Township, Hunterdon County).[46][47] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[48] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[49]

Hunterdon County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who serve three-year terms of office at-large on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the freeholders select one member to serve as the board's Director and another to serve as Deputy Director.[50] As of 2014, Hunterdon County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director J. Matthew Holt (R; Clinton Town, 2015),[51] Freeholder Deputy Director John King (R; Raritan Township, 2015),[52] Suzanne Lagay (R; Holland Township, 2016),[53] John E. Lanza (R; Flemington, 2016)[54] and Robert G. Walton (R; Hampton, 2014).[55][56] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Mary H. Melfi (R; Flemington, 2017),[57] Sheriff Fredrick W. Brown (R; Alexandria Township, 2016)[58] and Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman (R; Kingwood Township, 2018).[59][60][61]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 4,425 registered voters in Tewksbury Township, of which 699 (15.8%) were registered as Democrats, 2,310 (52.2%) were registered as Republicans and 1,412 (31.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 4 voters registered to other parties.[62]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 60.7% of the vote here (2,280 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 37.4% (1,403 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (39 votes), among the 3,754 ballots cast by the township's 4,502 registered voters, for a turnout of 83.4%.[63] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 66.7% of the vote here (2,321 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 33.2% (1,156 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (25 votes), among the 3,480 ballots cast by the township's 4,171 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 83.4.[64]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 66.7% of the vote here (1,982 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 21.5% (638 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 10.4% (310 votes) and other candidates with 0.2% (5 votes), among the 2,971 ballots cast by the township's 4,434 registered voters, yielding a 67.0% turnout.[65]

Education[edit]

The Tewksbury Township Schools is a public school district, which serves students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's two schools had an enrollment of 707 students and 64.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.01:1.[66] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[67]) are Tewksbury Elementary School[68] for grades K - 4 (351 students) and Old Turnpike School[69] for pre-Kindergarten and grades 5 - 8 (356 students).[70] The original elementary school, Sawmill, opened in 1951 and was sold in 2003 for $1 million to the Hunterdon County Educational Services Commission.[71]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Voorhees High School in Lebanon Township (although the mailing address is Glen Gardner), which also serves students from Califon Borough, Glen Gardner Borough, Hampton Borough, High Bridge Borough and Lebanon Township.[72][73] The school is part of the North Hunterdon-Voorhees Regional High School District, which also serves students from Bethlehem Township, Clinton Town, Clinton Township, Franklin Township, Lebanon Borough and Union Township at North Hunterdon High School.[74]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of 2010, the township had a total of 99.22 miles (159.68 km) of roadways, of which 82.81 miles (133.27 km) were maintained by the municipality, 15.39 miles (24.77 km) by Hunterdon County and 1.02 miles (1.64 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[75]

Interstate 78 passes through the Township, and is accessible via Oldwick Road (County Route 523) at Exit 24. County Route 517 also passes through the Township.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Tewksbury Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ a b Township of Tewksbury Elected Officials, Tewksbury Township. Accessed September 22, 2014.
  4. ^ a b Administration, Tewksbury Township. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 110.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Tewksbury, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Tewksbury township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 10. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Tewksbury township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Tewksbury Township, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  13. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Califon, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 7, 2014.
  14. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 31, 2012.
  16. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  18. ^ History of Tewksbury Township, Tewksbury Township. Accessed January 21, 2011.
  19. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 154. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  20. ^ a b Hunterdon County web page for Tewksbury Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  21. ^ About, Mane Stream. Accessed September 22, 2014.
  22. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 21, 2013.
  23. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed July 21, 2013. Population listed for 1840 of 1,952 is eight higher than value listed in table for that year.
  24. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 268, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 21, 2013. "Tewksbury township was formed in 1798. Its population in 1850 was 2,301; in 1860, 2,333; and in 1870, 2,327. New Germantown, Fairmount, Farmersville and Mountainville are in this township."
  25. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 139. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed July 19, 2013.
  26. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed July 19, 2013.
  27. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  28. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  29. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  30. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Tewksbury township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  32. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Tewksbury township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  33. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Tewksbury township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  34. ^ 2014 Municipal Data Sheet, Tewksbury Township. Accessed September 22, 2014.
  35. ^ Staff. "Hunterdon County election results 2012", Hunterdon County Democrat, November 6, 2012. Accessed September 22, 2014.
  36. ^ Staff. "Hunterdon County general election results 2013", Hunterdon County Democrat, November 5, 2013. Accessed September 22, 2014.
  37. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 65, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 65, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  42. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  43. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  44. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  45. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  46. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 7, 2014.
  47. ^ District 23 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 7, 2014.
  48. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ About the Board, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  51. ^ Matt Holt, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  52. ^ John King, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  53. ^ Suzanne Lagay, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  54. ^ John E. Lanza, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  55. ^ Robert G. Walton, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  56. ^ Hunterdon County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  57. ^ Hunterdon County Clerk Mary H. Melfi, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  58. ^ Frederick W. Brown; Hunterdon County Sheriff, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  59. ^ Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  60. ^ 2014 Elected Officials, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  61. ^ Wichert, Bill. "Hunterdon County sheriff re-elected, GOP newcomers win freeholder seats", The Star-Ledger, November 5, 2013. Accessed June 30, 2014. "County Sheriff Frederick Brown won a second three-year term over Democratic challenger Paul Carluccio. County Surrogate Susan Hoffman, who ran unopposed, also won re-election to a five-year term.When they join the all-Republican freeholders board in January, Lanza and Lagay will fill the seats vacated by Republicans George Melick and Will Mennen."
  62. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Hunterdon, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  63. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  64. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  65. ^ 2009 Governor: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  66. ^ District information for Tewksbury Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 22, 2014.
  67. ^ School Data for the Tewksbury Township Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 22, 2014.
  68. ^ Tewksbury Elementary School, Tewksbury Township Schools. Accessed September 22, 2014.
  69. ^ Old Turnpike School, Tewksbury Township Schools. Accessed September 22, 2014.
  70. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Tewksbury Township Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 22, 2014.
  71. ^ Staff. "Tewksbury school board to sell Sawmill School", New Jersey Hills, July 30, 2003. Accessed September 22, 2014. "Under the terms of the negotiated agreement, which school officials are hoping to finalize by the end of August, the Hunterdon County Educational Services Commission would pay $1 million for the circa-1950s school that is located on seven acres."
  72. ^ Voorhees High School 2013 Report Card Narratives, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 22, 2014. "With a current enrollment of 1,133 students in grades 9-12, the school serves the communities of Califon, Glen Gardner, Hampton, High Bridge, Lebanon Township, and Tewksbury Township."
  73. ^ Public School Directory 2013-2014, p. 60. Hunterdon County Department of Education. Accessed September 22, 2014.
  74. ^ About the District, North Hunterdon-Voorhees Regional High School District. Accessed September 22, 2014. "Our district consists of 12 municipalities: North Hunterdon High School educates students from: Bethlehem Township, Clinton Town, Clinton Township, Franklin Township, Lebanon Borough, Union Township; Voorhees High School educates students from: Califon, Glen Gardner, Hampton, High Bridge, Lebanon Township, Tewksbury Township"
  75. ^ Hunterdon County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  76. ^ Staff. American printer and lithographer, Volume 17, p. 65, Moore Publishing Co., 1893. Accessed March 14, 1993.
  77. ^ Morella, Nicole. "Jersey's John Amos stars as sitcom dad", Courier News (New Jersey), September 13, 2003. Accessed January 21, 2011. "Amos, who owns a home in Tewksbury but lives on his boat off the coast of Mexico , also has been seen recently on NBC's hit 'The West Wing'."
  78. ^ Regan, Michelle. "Tewksbury native hopes to have winning commercial for Superbowl", Hunterdon Review, January 22, 2009. Accessed January 21, 2011.
  79. ^ Staff. "Mountain Lakes alumnus Bucco preps for championship game", Daily Record (Morristown), May 25, 2008. Accessed March 14, 2011. "Princeton's Dan Cocoziello of Oldwick, earned first-team honors for the first time in his four-year collegiate career."
  80. ^ Speers, W. "MODEL-AGENCY FORDS LOSE N. JERSEY HOME TO FIRE", The Philadelphia Inquirer, March 4, 1993. Accessed March 29, 2008. "The fab North Jersey home of Gerard and Eileen Ford, owners of the fashion industry's most prestigious modeling agency, was pretty much totaled by fire Tuesday night. Nobody was hurt but a fire official said the Tewksbury Township home was 90 percent destroyed."
  81. ^ Wilson, Eric. "Jerry Ford, 83, Man Behind the Models, Dies", The New York Times, August 26, 2008. Accessed March 14, 2011. "Jerry Ford, who with his wife, Eileen, established one of the most recognizable modeling agencies in the world, turning a profession regarded as practically a hobby in the 1940s into one dominated by well-paid supermodels in the 1980s, died on Sunday in Morristown, N.J.. He was 83 and lived in Oldwick, N.J."
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