Teller County, Colorado

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Teller County, Colorado
Seal of Teller County, Colorado
Seal
Map of Colorado highlighting Teller County
Location in the state of Colorado
Map of the U.S. highlighting Colorado
Colorado's location in the U.S.
FoundedMarch 23, 1899
SeatCripple Creek
Largest cityWoodland Park
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

558.96 sq mi (1,448 km²)
557.06 sq mi (1,443 km²)
1.89 sq mi (5 km²), 0.34%
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

20,555
37/sq mi (14/km²)
Time zoneMountain: UTC-7/-6
Websitewww.co.teller.co.us
 
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Teller County, Colorado
Seal of Teller County, Colorado
Seal
Map of Colorado highlighting Teller County
Location in the state of Colorado
Map of the U.S. highlighting Colorado
Colorado's location in the U.S.
FoundedMarch 23, 1899
SeatCripple Creek
Largest cityWoodland Park
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

558.96 sq mi (1,448 km²)
557.06 sq mi (1,443 km²)
1.89 sq mi (5 km²), 0.34%
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

20,555
37/sq mi (14/km²)
Time zoneMountain: UTC-7/-6
Websitewww.co.teller.co.us

Teller County is the 22nd most populous of the 64 counties of the State of Colorado of the United States. The county population was 20,555 at U.S. Census 2000.[1] The county seat is Cripple Creek, and the most populous city is Woodland Park. The Colorado Springs Metropolitan Statistical Area which comprises El Paso County and Teller County, had an estimated population of 660,319 in 2011.

Contents

History

A few years after gold was discovered in Cripple Creek, political differences between area miners and mine owners, many of whom lived in Colorado Springs, resulted in the division of El Paso County.[2] Created in 1899, Teller County was carved from the western slope of Pikes Peak, and was named after United States Senator Henry M. Teller. Within five years of its formation, Teller County became the scene of a dramatic labor struggle called the Colorado Labor Wars.

Geography

According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 558.96 square miles (1,447.7 km2), of which 557.06 square miles (1,442.8 km2) (or 99.66%) is land and 1.89 square miles (4.9 km2) (or 0.34%) is water.[3]

Major Roads

Adjacent counties

Teller County Court House in Cripple Creek.

Demographics

Mountains in Teller County.
A ranch home with an airplane in the county.

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 20,555 people, 7,993 households, and 5,922 families residing in the county. The population density was 37 people per square mile (14/km²). There were 10,362 housing units at an average density of 19 per square mile (7/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 94.92% White, 0.55% Black or African American, 0.97% Native American, 0.58% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 0.90% from other races, and 2.00% from two or more races. 3.49% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 7,993 households out of which 33.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.20% were married couples living together, 6.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.90% were non-families. 19.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the county the population was spread out with 25.90% under the age of 18, 5.60% from 18 to 24, 31.20% from 25 to 44, 29.80% from 45 to 64, and 7.50% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 102.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $50,165, and the median income for a family was $57,071. Males had a median income of $37,194 versus $26,934 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,412. About 3.40% of families and 5.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.90% of those under age 18 and 4.20% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns

Amazonite crystal, from Crystal Peak area near Florissant.

National park and forest

State parks

Historic district

Casinos in Cripple Creek.

Transcontinental trail

Scenic byway

See also

References

  1. ^ "Annual County Population Estimates and Estimated Components of Change: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2006 (CO-EST2006-alldata)" (CSV). 2006 Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. 2007-03-22. http://www.census.gov/popest/counties/files/CO-EST2006-ALLDATA.csv. Retrieved 2007-05-09. 
  2. ^ Elizabeth Jameson, All That Glitters—Class, Conflict, and Community in Cripple Creek, 1998, page 168.
  3. ^ "Census 2000 U.S. Gazetteer Files: Counties". United States Census. http://www.census.gov/tiger/tms/gazetteer/county2k.txt. Retrieved 2011-02-13. 
  4. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links

Coordinates: 38°53′N 105°09′W / 38.88°N 105.15°W / 38.88; -105.15