Ted Vactor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Ted Vactor
Date of birth:(1944-05-27) May 27, 1944 (age 69)
Place of birth:Washington, Pennsylvania
Career information
College:University of Nebraska
Organizations
As coach:
1977–1982

1983
District of Columbia
 (Head coach)
Washington Federals
 (Asst.)
As player:
1969–1973
1975
Washington Redskins
Chicago Bears
Career stats
Playing stats at NFL.com
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Ted Vactor
Date of birth:(1944-05-27) May 27, 1944 (age 69)
Place of birth:Washington, Pennsylvania
Career information
College:University of Nebraska
Organizations
As coach:
1977–1982

1983
District of Columbia
 (Head coach)
Washington Federals
 (Asst.)
As player:
1969–1973
1975
Washington Redskins
Chicago Bears
Career stats
Playing stats at NFL.com

Theodore Francis Vactor (born May 27, 1944) is a former American football cornerback in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins and Chicago Bears. He played college football at the University of Nebraska. In 1999 Ted was inducted to the Washington-Greene County Chapter of the Pennsylvania Hall of Fame and in 2000 he was inducted into the Nebraska Hall of Fame.

Vactor is often mistakenly credited with blocking the Miami Dolphins' Garo Yepremian's late field goal attempt in Super Bowl VII that led to the bizarre fumble-return touchdown by the Washington Redskins' Mike Bass. Vactor rushed from the left side and just missed blocking the kick; the kick was actually blocked by defensive lineman Bill Brundige.

Vactor also served as the head football coach at the University of the District of Columbia from 1977 to 1982 where he compiled an overall record of 24–31–1.[1][2] He resigned his position as the Firebirds' head coach in 1983 to become an assistant coach with the Washington Federals of the United States Football League.[2]

Head coaching record[edit]

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
District of Columbia Firebirds () (1977–1982)
1979District of Columbia7–3
1980District of Columbia2–7–1
1981District of Columbia3–7
1982District of Columbia2–8
District of Columbia:24–31–1
Total:24–31–1
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bart Barnes (August 31, 1980). "Practicality helps Vactor turn UDC into a winner". The Washington Post. p. F7. 
  2. ^ a b Mark Asher (January 28, 1983). "UDC's Vactor becomes coach with Federals". The Washington Post. p. C5.