Ted Cruz

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Ted Cruz
United States Senator
from Texas
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 3, 2013
Serving with John Cornyn
Preceded byKay Bailey Hutchison
Solicitor General of Texas
In office
January 9, 2003 – May 2008
GovernorRick Perry
Preceded byJulie Parsley
Succeeded byJames Ho
Personal details
BornRafael Edward Cruz
(1970-12-22) December 22, 1970 (age 42)
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Heidi Cruz
ChildrenCaroline
Catherine
Alma materPrinceton University (BA)
Harvard University (JD)
ReligionSouthern Baptist[1]
WebsiteTed Cruz for Senate
Senator Ted Cruz
Ted Cruz on Facebook
Ted Cruz on Twitter
 
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Ted Cruz
United States Senator
from Texas
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 3, 2013
Serving with John Cornyn
Preceded byKay Bailey Hutchison
Solicitor General of Texas
In office
January 9, 2003 – May 2008
GovernorRick Perry
Preceded byJulie Parsley
Succeeded byJames Ho
Personal details
BornRafael Edward Cruz
(1970-12-22) December 22, 1970 (age 42)
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Heidi Cruz
ChildrenCaroline
Catherine
Alma materPrinceton University (BA)
Harvard University (JD)
ReligionSouthern Baptist[1]
WebsiteTed Cruz for Senate
Senator Ted Cruz
Ted Cruz on Facebook
Ted Cruz on Twitter

Rafael Edward "Ted" Cruz (born December 22, 1970) is an American politician and the junior United States Senator for the state of Texas, in office since 2013. He is a member of the Republican Party.

Cruz was Solicitor General of Texas from 2003 to May 2008, appointed by Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott. He was the first Hispanic Solicitor General in Texas, the youngest Solicitor General in the United States, and had the longest tenure in the post thus far in Texas history. He was formerly a partner at the law firm Morgan, Lewis & Bockius, where he led the firm’s U.S. Supreme Court and national appellate litigation practice.[2]

He previously served as the director of the Office of Policy Planning at the Federal Trade Commission, an Associate Deputy Attorney General at the United States Department of Justice, and as Domestic Policy Advisor to U.S. President George W. Bush on the 2000 Bush-Cheney campaign. In addition, from 2004 to 2009 Cruz was an Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of Texas School of Law in Austin, where he taught U.S. Supreme Court litigation.

Cruz won the 2012 nomination for the Senate seat which was vacated by his fellow Republican, Kay Bailey Hutchison.[3] On July 31, 2012, he defeated Lieutenant Governor David Dewhurst in the Republican primary runoff, 57–43 percent.[4] Cruz defeated the Democrat Paul Sadler in the general election held on November 6, 2012; he prevailed with 56–41 percent over Sadler.[4] Cruz is also endorsed by the Tea Party Movement and the Republican Liberty Caucus.[5]

On November 14, 2012, Cruz was appointed vice-chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee.[6]

Contents

Early life and education

Cruz was born in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, where his parents, Eleanor Darragh and Rafael Cruz, were working in the oil business.[7][8] His father was a Cuban immigrant to the United States during the Cuban Revolution.[9] His mother, an American, was reared in Delaware, in a family of Irish and Italian descent.[8][10] Cruz's family returned to the U.S. when he was four years old.[9]

Cruz attended high school at Faith West Academy in Katy, Texas,[11] and then graduated from Second Baptist High School in Houston.

Cruz earned his Bachelor of Arts from Princeton University and his J.D., magna cum laude, from Harvard Law School. He was an editor of the Harvard Law Review, an executive editor of the Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, and a founding editor of the Harvard Latino Law Review.[12] While at Princeton, he competed for the American Whig-Cliosophic Society's Debate Panel as one of North America's top-ranked parliamentary debaters, winning the top speaker award at both the 1992 U.S. National Debating Championship and the 1992 North American Debating Championship.[13] In 1992, he was named Speaker of the Year and Team of the Year (with his debate partner, David Panton) by the American Parliamentary Debate Association.[13] In 1991 he and his partner came in second to Austan Goolsbee and partner David Gray. Cruz was also a semi-finalist at the 1995 World Universities Debating Championship.[14]

Legal career

Cruz served as a law clerk to William Rehnquist, Chief Justice of the United States, and J. Michael Luttig of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit.[15] Cruz was the first Hispanic ever to clerk for a Chief Justice of the United States.[16]

Cruz has authored more than 80 United States Supreme Court briefs and presented 43 oral arguments, including nine before the United States Supreme Court.[12]

In the landmark case of District of Columbia v. Heller, Cruz assembled a coalition of thirty-one states in defense of the principle that the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution guarantees an individual right to keep and bear arms.[17] Cruz also presented oral argument for the amici states in the companion case to Heller before the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

In addition to his victory in Heller, Cruz has successfully defended the Ten Commandments monument on the Texas State Capitol grounds, the recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance in public schools and the 2003 Texas redistricting plan.[18]

Cruz also successfully defended, in Medellin v. Texas, the State of Texas against an attempt by the International Court of Justice to re-open the criminal convictions of 51 murderers on death row throughout the United States.[12]

U.S. Senate

2012 election

Cruz speaking to the Values Voters Summit in October 2011.

On January 19, 2011, following an announcement that U.S. Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison would not seek reelection, Cruz announced via blogger conference call his candidacy for the position.[3] Cruz faced opposition from sitting Lieutenant Governor David Dewhurst in the Republican senatorial primary. Cruz was endorsed by David Barton, founder and president of WallBuilders;[19] the Club for Growth, a conservative political action committee;[20] Erick Erickson, editor of prominent conservative blog RedState;[21] the FreedomWorks for America super PAC;[22] Princeton University professor Robert P. George;[23] nationally syndicated radio host Mark Levin;[24] former Attorney General Edwin Meese;[25] Tea Party Express;[26] Young Conservatives of Texas;[27] and U.S. Senators Jim DeMint,[28] Mike Lee,[29] Rand Paul,[30] and Pat Toomey.[31] He has also been endorsed by former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin and former Texas Congressman Ron Paul,[32] Michigan Congressman Justin Amash,[33] and former U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania Rick Santorum.[34]

Cruz won the runoff for the Republican nomination with a 14-point margin over Dewhurst.[35] In the November 6 general election, Cruz faced the Democratic nominee Paul Sadler, an attorney and a former state representative from Henderson in east Texas. A public opinion poll conducted from October 15 to 21, 2012, indicated that Cruz was leading Sadler, 54-39 percent among likely voters. The poll questioned 800 voters and was conducted by the University of Texas and the Texas Tribune and has a margin of error of 3.46 percent.[36] He prevailed over Sadler by the approximate margin of 57–41 percent.

In the general election, Cruz prevailed with 4,469,843 ballots (56.4%) to Sadler's 3,194,927 (40.6%). Two minor candidates held the remaining 3% of the ballots cast.[4] Cruz ran 129,706 votes behind the Republican presidential nominee, Mitt Romney.[4]

Committee assignments

Personal life

Cruz was born and spent the first four years of his life in Calgary before his parents returned to Houston. His father was jailed and tortured by the Fulgencio Batista regime and fought for Fidel Castro in the Cuban Revolution[37] but "didn't know Castro was a Communist" and later became a staunch critic of Castro when "the rebel leader took control and began seizing private property and suppressing dissent."[38] Rafael Cruz moved to Austin in 1957 to study at the University of Texas. He spoke no English and had $100 sewn into his underwear.[39] The elder Cruz worked his way through school as a dishwasher making 50 cents an hour. Cruz's father today is a pastor in North Dallas and became a U.S. citizen in 2005. Cruz’s mother, who was from Delaware, was the first person in her family to attend college. She earned a degree in mathematics from Rice University in Houston in the 1950s, working summers at Foley’s and Shell. Cruz has said, "I'm Cuban, Irish, and Italian, and yet somehow I ended up Southern Baptist."[40]

Cruz and his wife, Heidi Nelson Cruz, have two daughters, Caroline Camille and Catherine Christiane. Cruz met his wife while working on the George W. Bush presidential campaign of 2000. Cruz's wife is currently head of the Southwest Region in the Investment Management Division of Goldman, Sachs & Co. and previously worked in the White House for Condoleezza Rice and in New York as an investment banker.[41]

Honors and awards

Electoral history

2012 Republican primary

Republican primary results, May 29, 2012[4]
PartyCandidateVotesPercentage
RepublicanDavid Dewhurst624,17044.6%
RepublicanTed Cruz479,07934.2%
RepublicanTom Leppert186,67513.3%
RepublicanCraig James50,2113.6%
RepublicanGlenn Addison22,8881.6%
RepublicanLela Pittenger18,0281.3%
RepublicanBen Gambini7,1930.5%
RepublicanCurt Cleaver6,6490.5%
RepublicanJoe Argis4,5580.3%
Totals1,399,451100%

2012 Republican primary runoff

Republican runoff results, July 31, 2012[4]
PartyCandidateVotesPercentage
RepublicanTed Cruz631,31656.8%
RepublicanDavid Dewhurst480,16543.2%
Totals1,111,481100%

2012 General Election

General Election, November 6, 2012[4]
PartyCandidateVotesPercentage
RepublicanTed Cruz4,469,84356.45%
DemocraticPaul Sadler3,194,92740.62%
LibertarianJohn Jay Myers162,3542.06%
GreenDavid Collins67,4040.85%
Totals7,864,822100%

See also

References

  1. ^ Hartfield, Elizabeth. Ted Cruz Wins In Texas GOP Senate Runoff, ABC News (2012-07-31). Retrieved on 2012-12-28.
  2. ^ Passarella, Gina (2008-05-06). "Morgan Lewis Adds Texas Solicitor General". Law.com. http://www.law.com/jsp/article.jsp?id=1202421154053. Retrieved 2011-06-02.
  3. ^ a b "Ted Cruz Makes it a New Game for U.S. Senate in Texas". RedState web site. 2011-01-19. http://www.redstate.com/hogan/2011/01/19/ted-cruz-makes-it-a-new-game-for-us-senate-in-texas/. Retrieved 2011-01-19.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g State of Texas, Office of the Secretary of State, Election Results
  5. ^ Planas, Roque (2012-07-16). "Ted Cruz Puts Dewhurst on Defensive in Last Debate Before Texas Runoff". Fox News. http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/politics/2012/07/18/ted-cruz-puts-dewhurst-on-defensive-in-final-debate-before-texas-primary-runoff/. Retrieved 2012-09-30.
  6. ^ Gillman, Todd J., Ted Cruz to help Senate GOP with “grassroots” outreach, Dallas Morning News, November 14, 2012.
  7. ^ Kate Zernike (18 November 2011). "A Test for the Tea Party in Texas Senate Race". New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/18/us/politics/ted-cruz-is-a-test-for-the-tea-party-in-texas-race.html?_r=1. Retrieved 18 November 2011.
  8. ^ a b Jeffrey, Terence.Ted Cruz: New Voice for the American Dream, Creators.com, 2011. Retrieved on 2013-02-16.
  9. ^ a b Ferguson, John Wayne. Texplainer: Could Canadian-Born Ted Cruz Be President?, Texas Tribune, August 13, 2012.
  10. ^ Weiner, Rachel (2012-08-01) Who is Ted Cruz?. The Washington Post. Retrieved on 2012-12-28.
  11. ^ Eriksen, Helen (2005-08-11). "Solicitor general carries "supreme" weight with Katy roots". Houston Chronicle web site. http://blogs.chron.com/insidekaty/archives/2005/08/supreme_court_l.html. Retrieved 2009-02-08.
  12. ^ a b c Ted Cruz for U.S. Senate – Bio, Tedcruz.org. accessed 2012-12-28.
  13. ^ a b Hall of Fame | Princeton Debate Panel. Debate.princeton.edu. Retrieved on 2012-12-28.
  14. ^ Howard Goodman (1995=01-10). "Australians win debate at Princeton; A Singapore woman won the award for best speaker; English is not her native language". Philadelphia Inquirer ("But the Harvard Law team was composed of two Princeton grads Ted Cruz and David Panton both Class of '92."). http://articles.philly.com/1995-01-10/news/25715479_1_death-penalty-princeton-university-war-criminals.
  15. ^ "R. (Ted) Edward Cruz > Attorney Biography > Lawyers". Morgan, Lewis & Bockius. 2011-03-29. http://www.morganlewis.com/bios/tcruz. Retrieved 2011-06-02.
  16. ^ Jeffery, Terry. Ted Cruz: New Voice for the American Dream, Townhall.com, May 25, 2011.
  17. ^ Block, Melissa (March 14, 2008). "D.C. Gun Ban Critic: Court Must Clarify Constitution". NPR. http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=88251874.
  18. ^ Reinert, Patty (June 28, 2006). "Most of Texas' redistricting map upheld". Houston Chronicle. http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/metropolitan/4009070.html.
  19. ^ TedCruz.org (June 13, 2011). "David Barton, Paul Pressler Endorse Cruz for Senate". http://www.tedcruz.org/post/2011/06/13/David-Barton-Paul-Pressler-Endorse-Cruz-for-Senate.
  20. ^ Toeplitz, Shira (June 2, 2011). "Club for Growth Picks Texas Senate Favorite". Roll Call Politics. http://www.rollcall.com/news/Club-for-Growth-Picks-Texas-Senate-Favorite-206144-1.html.
  21. ^ Erickson, Erick (June 2, 2011). "Ted Cruz for Senate". RedState. http://www.redstate.com/erick/2011/06/02/ted-cruz-for-senate-in-texas/.
  22. ^ Geraghty, Jim (June 2, 2011). "FreedomWorks PAC Likes Ted Cruz". National Review. http://www.nationalreview.com/campaign-spot/268649/freedomworks-pac-likes-ted-cruz. Retrieved 18 February 2013.
  23. ^ George, Robert (June 6, 2011). "Ted Cruz for Senate". https://www.facebook.com/note.php?note_id=2044928915498.
  24. ^ Levin, Mark (June 4, 2011). "Mark Levin endorses Ted Cruz for US Senate in Texas". The Right Scoop. http://www.therightscoop.com/mark-levin-endorses-ted-cruz-for-us-senate-in-texas/. Retrieved 18 February 2013.
  25. ^ "Join Conservative Stalwarts Shackelford, Meese". June 9, 2011. http://www.tedcruz.org/post/2011/06/09/Join-Conservative-Stalwarts-Shackelford-Meese.
  26. ^ Shapiro, Michael W. (January 25, 2012). "Tea Party Express endorses Ted Cruz for Senate in Waco". Waco Tribune-Herald. http://www.wacotrib.com/blogs/staff/wacopolitics/Tea-Party-Express-endorses-Ted-Cuz-for-Senate-in-Waco.html. Retrieved 18 February 2013.
  27. ^ Scharrer, Gary (January 5, 2012). "Young conservatives choose Cruz". San Antonio Express-News. http://blog.mysanantonio.com/texas-politics/2012/01/young-conservatives-choose-cruz/. Retrieved 18 February 2013.
  28. ^ Sullivan, Sean (November 28, 2011). "For DeMint, A Few Well-Timed Endorsements". National Journal. http://hotlineoncall.nationaljournal.com/archives/2011/11/for-demint-a-fe.php. Retrieved March 30, 2012.
  29. ^ Catanese, David (March 7, 2011). "Sen. Lee backs Ted Cruz in Texas". Politico. http://www.politico.com/blogs/davidcatanese/0311/Sen_Lee_backs_Ted_Cruz_in_Texas.html?showall. Retrieved March 30, 2012.
  30. ^ Gravois, John (July 26, 2011). "Tea Party stalwart Rand Paul backs Cruz over Dewhurst in Texas' U.S. Senate race". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. http://blogs.star-telegram.com/politex/2011/07/tea-party-stalwart-rand-paul-backs-cruz-over-dewhurst-in-senate-race.html. Retrieved 18 February 2013.
  31. ^ "Senator Pat Toomey". Ted Cruz for U.S. Senate. April 28, 2011. http://www.tedcruz.org/endorsements/2011/04/28/senator-pat-toomey/. Retrieved March 30, 2012.
  32. ^ Marin, Alex (2012-05-12). "Ron Paul and Sarah Palin Make Strange Bedfellows by Supporting Texas Tea Party Ted Cruz". PolicyMic. http://www.policymic.com/articles/8240/ron-paul-and-sarah-palin-make-strange-bedfellows-by-supporting-texas-tea-party-ted-cruz. Retrieved 2012-05-12.
  33. ^ Justin Amash. facebook.com
  34. ^ Weissert, Will. Santorum endorses Ted Cruz in Texas Senate race. Associated Press (2012-05-24). Retrieved on 2013-02-17.
  35. ^ Weissert, Will. Ted Cruz Defeats David Dewhurst In Texas Senate Runoff. Associated Press (2012-07-31). Retrieved on 2013-02-17.
  36. ^ Statewide Survey, UT-Austin/Texas Tribune, October 2012
  37. ^ "Texas GOP Senate candidate says he’s no Rubio, his father fought for Castro". The Daily Caller. November 1, 2011. http://news.yahoo.com/texas-gop-senate-candidate-says-no-rubio-father-151607155.html. Retrieved March 30, 2012.
  38. ^ Garrett, Robert T. (October 25, 2011). "Senate candidate Ted Cruz says he hasn't misled about father's exodus from Cuba". Dallas News. http://www.dallasnews.com/incoming/20111025-senate-candidate-ted-cruz-says-he-hasn-t-misled-about-father-s-exodus-from-cuba.ece. Retrieved May 7, 2012.
  39. ^ Ted Cruz for U.S. Senate – Bio at TedCruz.org, accessed 19 June 2011; quote: "When my Dad came to Austin in 1957, as a teenage immigrant from Cuba bound for the University of Texas, he spoke no English and had $100 sewn into his underwear. He worked his way through school as a dishwasher making 50 cents an hour, just as my Mom – the first person in her family ever to go to college – earned her math degree at Rice in the 1950s, working summers at Foley’s and Shell."
  40. ^ Cruz, Ted (2012-02-09). Hugh Hewitt Show. Interview with Hugh Hewitt.
  41. ^ "Board Member Bios: Heidi Cruz". Greater Houston Partnership. http://www.houston.org/greater-houston-partnership/about-us/bios.asp?bioID=212727. Retrieved August 2, 2012.

External links

Party political offices
Preceded by
Kay Bailey Hutchison
Republican nominee for U.S. Senator from Texas
(Class 1)

2012
Most recent
United States Senate
Preceded by
Kay Bailey Hutchison
U.S. Senator (Class 1) from Texas
2013–present
Served alongside: John Cornyn
Incumbent
United States order of precedence
Preceded by
Tim Kaine
D-Virginia
United States Senators by seniority
96th
Succeeded by
Elizabeth Warren
D-Massachusetts