Tatars

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Tatars
Tatarlar / Татарлар, تاتارلار
Mamai.jpg
Devlet II Giray.jpg
Tuhaj Bej.jpg
Taras Triasylo.jpg
Ayaz İshaki.jpg
Professor G. Akhatov.jpg
Tuqay.jpg
Calil student 1929.jpg
Gawrilowbrest.jpg
Nureyev 10 Allan Warren.jpg
Akhmetov Rinat Leonidovich.jpg
RuslanChagaev.jpg
Safina signing autographs.jpg
Irina Shayk (Straighten Crop).jpg
Bilya.JPG
London 2012 Aliya Mustafina.jpg
Nail Yakupov.png
Marat Safin, 2006.jpg
Chulpan-Hamatova-9-4!!!!-corrected by Alexey Nikishin.jpg
Alsou.jpg
Total population
ca. 6.8 million[citation needed]
Regions with significant populations
 Russia : 5,310,649[1]
 Turkey150,000 - 6,000,000[2]
 Uzbekistan467,829[3]
 Ukraine : 321,500[4]
 Kazakhstan203,371[5]
 Turkmenistan36,355[6]
 Kyrgyzstan28,334[7]
 Azerbaijan25,900[8]
 Romania20,282
Languages

Tatar, Crimean Tatar, Russian

languages of the regions where they live
Religion
Sunni Islam majority, Russian Orthodox minority
 
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Tatars
Tatarlar / Татарлар, تاتارلار
Mamai.jpg
Devlet II Giray.jpg
Tuhaj Bej.jpg
Taras Triasylo.jpg
Ayaz İshaki.jpg
Professor G. Akhatov.jpg
Tuqay.jpg
Calil student 1929.jpg
Gawrilowbrest.jpg
Nureyev 10 Allan Warren.jpg
Akhmetov Rinat Leonidovich.jpg
RuslanChagaev.jpg
Safina signing autographs.jpg
Irina Shayk (Straighten Crop).jpg
Bilya.JPG
London 2012 Aliya Mustafina.jpg
Nail Yakupov.png
Marat Safin, 2006.jpg
Chulpan-Hamatova-9-4!!!!-corrected by Alexey Nikishin.jpg
Alsou.jpg
Total population
ca. 6.8 million[citation needed]
Regions with significant populations
 Russia : 5,310,649[1]
 Turkey150,000 - 6,000,000[2]
 Uzbekistan467,829[3]
 Ukraine : 321,500[4]
 Kazakhstan203,371[5]
 Turkmenistan36,355[6]
 Kyrgyzstan28,334[7]
 Azerbaijan25,900[8]
 Romania20,282
Languages

Tatar, Crimean Tatar, Russian

languages of the regions where they live
Religion
Sunni Islam majority, Russian Orthodox minority

Tatars (Tatar: Татарлар, تاتارلار / Tatarlar (archaic spelling: "Tartars")) are Turkic[9][10][11][12][13] ethnic groups in Eastern Europe and Northern Asia. The two most common subgroups of the Tatars, the Volga and Crimean Tatars, are a native people of the Volga region (Tatarstan and Bashkortostan) and the Crimean peninsula, respectively, of Russia. Most Tatars live in the Russian Federation, with a population of 5.5 million, including 2 million in the republic of Tatarstan, 1 million in the republic of Bashkortostan and 2.5 million in other regions of Russia. There are 300,000 Crimean Tatars in Crimea and Ukraine, with about 200,000 in Uzbekistan and anywhere from 155,000 to 6,000,000 in Turkey. After the dissolution of the Soviet Union, significant populations of Tatars found themselves in the newly independent Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, and Ukraine.

History[edit]

Map of Tartaria (1705)

The history of the peoples named "Tatars" extends mainly to two different groups, the Crimean Tatars and the Volga Tatars.

The Crimean Tatars emerged as a nation at the time of the Crimean Khanate. The Crimean Khanate was a Turkic-speaking Muslim state which was among the strongest powers in Eastern Europe until the beginning of the 18th century. The nobles and rulers of the Crimean Tatars were the progeny of Hacı I Girai a Jochid descendant of Genghis Khan who was Great Mongol ruler, and thus of Batu Khan of the Mongol Golden Horde. The Crimean Tatars mostly adopted Islam in the 14th century and thereafter Crimea became one of the centers of Islamic civilization. The Russo-Turkish War (1768–74) resulted in the defeat of the Ottomans by the Russians, and according to the Treaty of Küçük Kaynarca (1774) signed after the war, Crimea became independent and Ottomans renounced their political right to protect the Crimean Khanate. After a period of political unrest in Crimea, Russia violated the treaty and annexed the Crimean Khanate in 1783.

The present territory of Tatarstan was inhabited by the Volga Bulgars who settled on the Volga river in the 7th century AD and converted to Islam in 922 during the missionary work of Ahmad ibn Fadlan.[citation needed] After the Mongol invasion, Volga Bulgaria was annexed by the Golden Horde. Most of the population survived, and there may have been a certain degree of mixing between it and the Kipchaks of the Horde during the ensuing period. The group as a whole accepted the exonym "Tatars" (finally in the end of the 19th century; although the name Bulgars persisted in some places; the majority identified themselves simply as the Muslims) and the language of the Kipchaks; on the other hand, the invaders eventually converted to Islam. As the Horde disintegrated in the 15th century, the area became the territory of the Kazan khanate, which was ultimately conquered by Russia in the 16th century.

Name[edit]

The first written record of the name "Tatar" appears on the Kul Tigin monument as Old Turkic letter N1.svgOld Turkic letter D1.svgOld Turkic letter O.svgOld Turkic letter B1.svgOld Turkic letter R1.svgOld Turkic letter T1.svgOld Turkic letter T1.svgOld Turkic letter Z.svgOld Turkic letter T1.svgOld Turkic letter O.svg Otuz Tatar Bodun ('Thirty Tatar' tribe).[citation needed] The name Tatar likely originated amongst the nomadic Tatar confederation in the north-eastern Gobi desert in the 5th century.[14] The name "Tatars" was used an alternative term for the Shiwei, a nomadic confederation to which these Tatar people belonged.

As various of these nomadic groups became part of Genghis Khan's army in the early 13th century, a fusion of Mongol and Turkic elements took place, and the invaders of Rus and the Pannonian Basin became known to Europeans as Tatars or Tartars (see Tatar yoke).[14] After the breakup of the Mongol Empire, the Tatars became especially identified with the western part of the empire, known as the Golden Horde.[14] The name "Tatar" became a name for populations of the former Golden Horde in Europe, such as those of the former Kazan, Crimean, Astrakhan, Qasim, and Siberian Khanates.

The form Tartar has its origins in either Latin or French, coming to Western European languages from Turkish and Persian Tātār ("mounted courier, mounted messenger; postrider"). From the beginning, the extra r was present in the Western forms, and according to the Oxford English Dictionary this was most likely due to an association with Tartarus (Hell in Greek mythology), though some claim that the name Tartar was in fact used amongst the Tatars themselves. Another possibility is that Tartar in British Received Pronunciation is pronounced as Tātar. Nowadays Tatar is usually used to refer to the people, but Tartar is still almost always used for derived terms such as tartar sauce or steak tartare.[15]

Most of the Turkic people living in Russian Empire were named Tatar by the authorities despite different endonymes used before they came under Russian rule. Some examples are:

Today most of these people don't use these exonyms for self-designation and see themselves related to Tatars, yet separate ethnic groups. Chulyms, Khakas people and Shors still use word Tatar or Tadar for self-designation, but still have different self-consciousness as ethnic groups. The name "Tatar" eventually only stuck to four main populations, the Volga Bulgars and the Muslim peoples who lived on the bank of the Volga river and the former Khazar empire (Astrakhan and Volga Tatars), the Islamized west Siberian tribes (Siberian Tatars), and the Turkic-speaking Muslims of Crimea (Crimean Tatars). There is another group, called the Lipka Tatars. They originated from mainly Turkic-speaking Muslim immigrants to the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth from the decaying khanates of the Golden Horde.

Some Volga Tatars prefer to be called Bulgars and reject the Tatar name, a position known as Bulgarism. Bulgarism pertains to the notion that the Volga Tatars are actual Bulgars.

Language[edit]

The Tatar language together with the Bashkir language forms the Kypchak-Bolgar (also "Uralo-Caspian") group within the Kypchak languages, also known as Northwestern Turkic.

There are three Tatar dialects: Eastern, Central, Western.[17] The Western dialect (Misher) is spoken mostly by Mishärs, the Central dialect is spoken by Kazan and Astrakhan Tatars, and the Eastern (Sibir) dialect is spoken by Siberian Tatars in western Siberia. All three dialects have subdialects. Central Tatar is the base of literary Tatar.

Tatar was written with the Arabic alphabet prior to 1928, in the so-called İske imlâ alphabet and from 1920 to 1928 in the Yaña imlâ alphabet. In 1928 the Soviet Union introduced a Latin orthography, known as Jaŋalif. Jaŋalif was replaced by a Cyrillic orthography in 1940. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, use of Jaŋalif was revived, but the Cyrillic script was again enforced in 2002, when the Russian Federation passed a controversial law enforcing the use of Cyrillic for all official languages.[18]

Crimean Tatar[19] is the indigenous language of the Crimean Tatar peoples. Because of its common name, Crimean Tatar is sometimes mistaken to be a dialect of Kazan Tatar. Although these languages are related (as both are Turkic), the Kypchak languages closest to Crimean Tatar are (as mentioned above) Kumyk and Karachay-Balkar, not Kazan Tatar.

Subgroups[edit]

The majority of the Tatar population are Volga Tatars, native to the Volga region and the Crimean Tatars of Crimea, there are smaller groups of Lipka Tatars and Astrakhan Tatars in Europe and the Siberian Tatars in Asia.

Volga Tatars[edit]

A picture of Qolsharif and his students defending their mosque during the Siege of Kazan.

Some Volga Tatars speak different dialects of Tatar language. Therefore, they form distinct groups such as the Mişär group and the Qasim group. Mişär-Tatars (or Mishars) are a group of Tatars speaking a dialect of the Tatar language. They live in Chelyabinsk, Tambov, Penza, Ryazan, Nizhegorodskaya oblasts of Russia and in Bashkortostan and Mordovia. They lived near and along the Volga River, in Tatarstan. The Western Tatars have their capital in the town of Qasím (Kasimov in Russian transcription) in Ryazan Oblast, with a Tatar population of 1100.[citation needed] A minority of Christianized Volga Tatars are known as Keräşens.

The Volga Tatars used the Turkic Old Tatar language for their literature between the 15th and 19th centuries. It was written in the İske imlâ variant of the Arabic script, but actual spelling varied regionally. The older literary language included a large number of Arabic and Persian loanwords. The modern literary language, however, often uses Russian and other European-derived words instead.

Outside of Tatarstan, urban Tatars usually speak Russian as their first language (in cities such as Moscow, Saint-Petersburg, Nizhniy Novgorod, Tashkent, Almaty, and cities of the Ural and western Siberia) and other languages in a worldwide diaspora.

In the 1910s the Volga Tatars numbered about half a million in the Kazan Governorate in Tatarstan, their historical homeland, about 400,000 in each of the governments of Ufa, 100,000 in Samara and Simbirsk, and about 30,000 in Vyatka, Saratov, Tambov, Penza, Nizhny Novgorod, Perm and Orenburg. An additional 15,000 had migrated to Ryazan or were settled as prisoners in the 16th and 17th centuries in Lithuania (Vilnius, Grodno and Podolia). An additional 2000 resided in St. Petersburg. The Kazan Tatars speak the Tatar language, a Turkic language with substantial amount of Russian and Arabic loanwords. Most Kazan Tatars practice Sunni Islam.

Before 1917, polygamy was practised[citation needed] only by the wealthier classes and was a waning institution.

There is an ethnic nationalist movement among Kazan Tatars which stresses descent from the Bulgars and is known as Bulgarism – there have been graffiti on the walls in the streets of Kazan with phrases such as "Bulgaria is alive" (Булгария жива)

A significant number of Volga Tatars emigrated during the Russian Civil War, mostly to Turkey and Harbin, China. According to the Chinese government, there are still 5,100 Tatars living in Xinjiang province.

Crimean Tatars[edit]

Cossacks fighting Tatars of Crimea.

The number of Crimean Tatars is estimated at 650,000. The Crimean Tatars emerged as a nation at the time of the Crimean Khanate. The Crimean Khanate was a Turkic-speaking Muslim state which was among the strongest powers in Eastern Europe until the beginning of the 18th century.[20] The rulers of the Crimean Tatars were the progeny of Hacı I Giray a Jochid descendant of Genghis Khan. The Crimean Tatars are subdivided into three sub-ethnic groups: the Tats (not to be confused with Tat people, living in the Caucasus region) who used to inhabit the mountainous Crimea before 1944 (about 55%), the Yalıboyu who lived on the southern coast of the peninsula (about 30%), and the Noğay (about 15%).

Lipka Tatars[edit]

At the Battle of Warsaw in 1656 Tatars fought with the Poles against the Swedes
Swedish King Charles X Gustav in skirmish with Tatars near Warsaw during the Second Northern War.

The Lipka Tatars are a group of Turkic-speaking Tatars who originally settled in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania at the beginning of the 14th century. The first settlers tried to preserve their shamanistic religion and sought asylum amongst the non-Christian Lithuanians.[21] Towards the end of the 14th century, another wave of Tatars—Muslims, this time—were invited into the Grand Duchy by Vytautas the Great. These Tatars first settled in Lithuania proper around Vilnius, Trakai, Hrodna and Kaunas [21] and later spread to other parts of the Grand Duchy that later became part of Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth. These areas comprise present-day Lithuania, Belarus and Poland. From the very beginning of their settlement in Lithuania they were known as the Lipka Tatars.

From the 13th to 17th centuries various groups of Tatars settled and/or found refuge within the Polish-Lithuanian commonwealth. This was promoted especially by the Grand Dukes of Lithuania, because of their reputation as skilled warriors. The Tatar settlers were all granted szlachta (nobility) status, a tradition that was preserved until the end of the Commonwealth in the 18th century. They included the Lipka Tatars (13th–14th centuries) as well as Crimean and Nogay Tatars (15th–16th centuries), all of which were notable in Polish military history, as well as Volga Tatars (16th–17th centuries). They all mostly settled in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, lands that are now in Lithuania and Belarus.

Various estimates of the number of Tatars in the Commonwealth in the 17th century are about 15,000 persons and 60 villages with mosques. Numerous royal privileges, as well as internal autonomy granted by the monarchs allowed the Tatars to preserve their religion, traditions and culture over the centuries. The Tatars were allowed to intermarry with Christians, a thing uncommon in Europe at the time. The May Constitution of 1791 gave the Tatars representation in the Polish Sejm.

Although by the 18th century the Tatars adopted the local language, the Islamic religion and many Tatar traditions (e.g. the sacrifice of bulls in their mosques during the main religious festivals) were preserved. This led to formation of a distinctive Muslim culture, in which the elements of Muslim orthodoxy mixed with religious tolerance formed a relatively liberal society. For instance, the women in Lipka Tatar society traditionally had the same rights and status as men, and could attend non-segregated schools.

About 5,500 Tatars lived within the inter-war boundaries of Poland (1920–1939), and a Tatar cavalry unit had fought for the country's independence. The Tatars had preserved their cultural identity and sustained a number of Tatar organisations, including a Tatar archives, and a museum in (Vilnius).

The Tatars suffered serious losses during World War II and furthermore, after the border change in 1945 a large part of them found themselves in the Soviet Union. It is estimated that about 3000 Tatars live in present-day Poland, of which about 500 declared Tatar (rather than Polish) nationality in the 2002 census. There are two Tatar villages (Bohoniki and Kruszyniany) in the north-east of present-day Poland, as well as urban Tatar communities in Warsaw, Gdańsk, Białystok, and Gorzów Wielkopolski. Tatars in Poland sometimes have a Muslim surname with a Polish ending: Ryzwanowicz; another surname sometimes adopted by more assimilated Tatars is Tataranowicz or Taterczyński, literally "son of a Tatar".

The Tatars were relatively very noticeable in the Commonwealth military as well as in Polish and Lithuanian political and intellectual life for such a small community.[citation needed] In modern-day Poland, their presence is also widely known, due in part to their noticeable role in the historical novels of Henryk Sienkiewicz, which are universally recognized in Poland. A number of Polish intellectual figures have also been Tatars, e.g. the prominent historian Jerzy Łojek.

A small community of Polish speaking Tatars settled in Brooklyn, New York City in the early 1900s. They established a mosque that is still in use today.

Astrakhan Tatars[edit]

Tatar cavalry training in their Sarai.

The Astrakhan Tatars (around 80,000) are a group of Tatars, descendants of the Astrakhan Khanate's nomadic population, who live mostly in Astrakhan Oblast. For the 2000 Russian census 2000, most Astrakhan Tatars declared themselves simply as Tatars and few declared themselves as Astrakhan Tatars. A large number of Volga Tatars live in Astrakhan Oblast and differences between them have been disappearing.

The Astrakhan Tatars are further divided into the Kundrov, Yurt and Karagash Tatars. The latter are also at times called the Karashi Tatars.[22]

Text from Britannica 1911:

The Astrakhan Tatars number about 10,000 and are, with the Kalmyks, all that now remains of the once so powerful Astrakhan empire. They also are agriculturists and gardeners; while some 12,000 Kundrovsk Tatars still continue the nomadic life of their ancestors.

While Astrakhan (Ästerxan) Tatar is a mixed dialect, around 43,000 have assimilated to the Middle (i.e., Kazan) dialect. Their ancestors are Khazars, Kipchaks and some Volga Bulgars. (Volga Bulgars had trade colonies in modern Astrakhan and Volgograd oblasts of Russia.)

The Astrakhan Tatars also assimilated the Agrzhan.[23]

Siberian Tatars[edit]

The Siberian Tatars occupy three distinct regions—a strip running west to east from Tobolsk to Tomsk—the Altay and its spurs—and South Yeniseisk. They originated in the agglomerations of various Uralo-Altaic stems that, in the region north of the Altay, reached some degree of culture between the 4th and 5th centuries, but were subdued and enslaved by the Mongols.

The 2010 census recorded 6,779 Siberian Tatars in Russia. According to the 2002 census there are 500,000 Tatars in Siberia, but 300,000 of them are Volga Tatars who settled in Siberia during periods of colonization.[24]

Baraba Tatars[edit]

The Baraba Tatars take their name from one of their stems (Barama). After a strenuous resistance to Russian conquest, and much suffering at a later period from Kyrgyz and Kalmyk raids, they now live by agriculture—either in separate villages or along with Russians.

They numbered at least 9,000 in 1990.

Dobruja Tatars[edit]

Tatars were present on the territory of today's Romania and Bulgaria since the 13th century. In Romania, according to the 2002 census, 24,000 people declared their ethnicity as Tatar, most of them being Crimean Tatars living in Constanţa County in the region of Dobruja. The Crimean Tatars were colonized there by the Ottoman Empire beginning in the 17th century.

Traditional celebrations[edit]

Historically, the traditional celebrations of Tatars depended largely on the agricultural cycle.

Spring/summer period[edit]

Fall/winter period[edit]

Tatar cuisine[edit]

Tatar cuisine is rich with hot soups (şulpa), dough-based dishes (qistibi, pilmän, öçpoçmaq, etc.) and sweets (çäkçäk, göbädiä, etc.). Traditional Tatar beverages include ayran, katyk and kumys.

Gallery[edit]

Flags[edit]

Pictures[edit]

Paintings[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Russian Census 2010: Population by ethnicity (Russian)
  2. ^ Crimean Tatars and Noghais in Turkey
  3. ^ "Uzbekistan – Ethnic minorities". Retrieved 2011-06-03. 
  4. ^ "About number and composition population of Ukraine by data All-Ukrainian census of the population 2001". Ukraine Census 2001. State Statistics Committee of Ukraine. Retrieved 17 January 2012. 
  5. ^ Агентство Республики Казахстан по статистике: Численность населения Республики Казахстан по отдельным этносам на 1 января 2012 года
  6. ^ Asgabat.net-городской социально-информационный портал :Итоги всеобщей переписи населения Туркменистана по национальному составу в 1995 году.
  7. ^ http://www.stat.kg/stat.files/din.files/census/5010003.pdf.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  8. ^ http://www.azstat.org/statinfo/demoqraphic/en/AP_/1_5.xls
  9. ^ Encyclopedia Brittanica: Tatar, also spelled Tartar, any member of several Turkic-speaking peoples ... [1]
  10. ^ The Columbia Encyclopedia: Tatars (tä´tərz) or Tartars (tär´tərz), Turkic-speaking peoples living primarily in Russia, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. [2]
  11. ^ Meriam-Webster: Tatar – a member of any of a group of Turkic peoples found mainly in the Tatar Republic of Russia and parts of Siberia and central Asia [3]
  12. ^ Oxford Dictionaries: Tatar – a member of a Turkic people living in Tatarstan and various other parts of Russia and Ukraine. They are the descendants of the Tartars who ruled central Asia in the 14th century. [4]
  13. ^ Encyclopedia of the Modern Middle East and North Africa: Turks are an ethnolinguistic group living in a broad geographic expanse extending from southeastern Europe through Anatolia and the Caucasus Mountains and throughout Central Asia. Thus Turks include the Turks of Turkey, the Azeris of Azerbaijan, and the Kazakhs, Kyrgyz, Tatars, Turkmen, and Uzbeks of Central Asia, as well as many smaller groups in Asia speaking Turkic languages. [5]
  14. ^ a b c Tatar. (2006). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved October 28, 2006, from Encyclopædia Britannica Online: http://search.eb.com/eb/article-9071375
  15. ^ "Tartar, Tatar, n.2 (a.)". (1989). In Oxford English Dictionary. Retrieved 11 September 2008, from Oxford English Dictionary Online.
  16. ^ The name originating from the name of Spruce-fir Taiga forests in Russian language: черневая тайга
  17. ^ Akhatov G. "Tatar dialectology". Kazan, 1984.(Tatar language)
  18. ^ Russia reconsiders Cyrillic law BBC News, 5 October 2004.
  19. ^ also called Crimean language, Crimean Turkish
  20. ^ Halil İnalcik, 1942[page needed]
  21. ^ a b (Lithuanian) Lietuvos totoriai ir jų šventoji knyga – Koranas
  22. ^ Olson, James S., An Ethnohistorical Dictionary of the Russian and Soviet Empires. (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1994) p. 55
  23. ^ Wixman, Ronald. The Peoples of the USSR: An Ethnographic Handbook. (Armonk, New York: M. E. Sharpe, Inc, 1984) p. 15
  24. ^ Siberian Tatars