Taoist Tai Chi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

 
Jump to: navigation, search
Two Taoist Tai Chi practitioners performing the movement Wave Hands like Clouds (or Cloud Hands)

Taoist Tai Chi is an exercise form of t'ai chi ch'uan which is taught in more than 25 countries by the non-profit International Taoist Tai Chi Society and associated national Taoist Tai Chi societies. It is a modified form of Yang-style t'ai chi ch'uan developed by Taoist monk Moy Lin-shin in Toronto, Canada. Moy incorporated principles of Lok Hup Ba Fa and other internal arts to increase the health benefits of practising the form. [1]

Taoist Tai Chi Awareness Days have been proclaimed by municipal governments across Canada since the 1980s to acknowledge that "the slow and graceful movements of Tai Chi relax and strengthen the body and mind, help to relieve stress, develop flexibility and coordination which is particularly beneficial to seniors and others in combating a variety of health conditions and disabilities" [2] These proclaimed days also serve to acknowledge that "members of the Taoist Tai Chi Society contribute many hours of service to our community, conducting fund-raising campaigns and events that have benefited many charitable organizations and other worthy causes,"[2]

Health benefits[edit]

Tai Chi in general[edit]

Tai Chi generally provides health benefits. In all the forms of Tai Chi there are movements that involve briefly standing on one leg, which may improve balance; circular movements of the shoulders and wrists which improve suppleness and circulation; learning the sequence of the set movements may improve cognitive function such as concentration; the social atmosphere can sometimes forge friendships and alleviate loneliness and anxiety; and the exercise itself can boost a person's mood and alleviate depression.[3][4]

All forms of Tai Chi have been noted by YK Chen as regulating body weight, improving cognitive, lung, digestive and heart functioning as well as improving skin tone and bone structure.[3]

Research on Tai Chi in general, carried out at the University of Toronto by Dahong Zhou, MD, shows that Tai Chi provides moderate exercise, equal to brisk walking. Zhou also notes that Tai Chi in general reduces stress levels and emotional problems while improving "concentration, attention, composure, self confidence, and self control". Zhou indicates that Tai Chi generally reduces hypertension, relieves chronic headaches, dizziness and insomnia, has benefits for people suffering with mild arthritis and rheumatism, improves breathing and blood circulation and is "an excellent exercise for the mind." His research shows that due to the low intensity of most forms of Tai Chi, that as an exercise regimen it does not lead to fatigue or stress.[4]

Taoist Tai Chi[edit]

The health claims made for Taoist Tai Chi by the Taoist Tai Chi Society are generally similar to those made for all forms of Tai Chi.[1][3][4][5][6][7][8]

In common with other forms of Tai Chi, the society says that for beginners Tai Chi starts out as primarily an external exercise, but for more advanced students it becomes more internal, exercising the internal organs and mind as well as the frame and muscles. Early in learning the Tai Chi set students may notice that the form strengthens the larger muscle groups in the legs, arms and back. According to the Taoist Tai Chi Society, the stretching aspects of the form improves the functioning of the joints, tendons and ligaments by taking them through their full range of motion. This can improve flexibility and reduce age-related deterioration.[5]

The Taoist Tai Chi Society claims that later in their training students note increased mobility in the spine and that the form restores proper alignment of the spine with the shoulders and pelvis through the spinal stretches and rotations that are built into the set. Additionally the society claims that the form stimulates the spinal nerves, providing a balancing effect on the nervous system. Later on in practice the student may find that the set will exercise the internal organs, possibly resulting in increased circulation, digestion and elimination. The society claims that the set strengthens the cardiovascular system, improves physical conditioning, decreases fatigue and improves endurance.[5]

Many of the health benefits claimed are related to the relaxation aspects of the Taoist Tai Chi set. The long stretches in the set may reduce tension at a muscular level and the slow pace of the set can create both mental and physical relaxation. The society claims that by relaxing the mind during Tai Chi the brain requires less blood and nutrients and that this allows the rest of the body to make use of these. This all may act to calm the heart and mind, while possibly improving strength and reducing overall stress.[5]

Philosophically, the tai chi taught by the Taoist Tai Chi Society is stated to be taught from a belief that people are innately good but that the nature of society causes people to become self-centred and to acquire bad habits. The aim of the training is to "eliminate these weaknesses so that our original nature of goodness can again shine brightly, guiding our thoughts and actions."[5] To achieve this the society promotes the virtues of compassion and service to others, through students becoming instructors who then teach Tai Chi to new students without any personal gain. In some cases, Tai Chi may be taught by the society as an integrated meditation art as well as an exercise program.[5]

The Taoist Tai Chi Society sums up the challenges:

It is not easy to achieve the state of emptiness or stillness in the midst of today’s busy and complex lifestyle. To achieve stillness and yet be involved and active is even more difficult. Practicing Taoist Tai Chi fosters stillness since the focused concentration required to do the Tai Chi set (and developed in learning it) occupies the mind, drawing it away from daily worries and tensions. Learning to quiet the mind, even while moving through the Tai Chi set, lays a foundation for integrating the principle of stillness—and the recognition of our original nature—into our daily lives. [5]

Form principles[edit]

Taoist Tai Chi has several principles of movement that are meant to be a part of every posture, these principles are what defines Taoist Tai Chi as a unique tai chi practice.[9] Several of these are attributes espoused by many non-Society teachers, but are expressed somewhat differently than is traditional within Taoist Tai Chi. Here is a brief description.

45 Degree Angle Step"
the principle of Straight/45 refers to the desired degree of the feet in relation to one another, usually with the front foot Straight forward and the back foot (left or right) at 45 degrees outward. This is meant to aid in squaring the hips.[9]
Positioning the Front Knee
The knee should not extend beyond the toes to prevent injury.[9]
"Squaring the hips"
at the end/forward position of a movement (such as Single Whip) the hips of a practitioner should be square or facing completely forward and in line with the front or "Straight" foot. Conversely, when at the rollback or beginning of a posture the hips should be in line with the back or "45" foot. The professed health benefit of this is that it facilitates a turning/stretching of the spine and an opening of the pelvic region (specifically the hip joint).[9]
Weight placement
there should be a straight line from the top of the head to the heel of the rear foot in all forward positions.
"Equal and Opposite Forces"
In Taoist Tai Chi a push with one hand is balanced with an equal push with the other hand.[9]

Foundation exercises[edit]

In addition to the full 108 Taoist Tai Chi set, students are taught a unique group of cyclical foundation exercises that focus on the joints, called "the jongs". Most of these exercises, either in their form or execution, are completely unique to Taoist Tai Chi. These exercises are not only used as preliminaries to the form, they are espoused as being the basic elements that provide health benefit in the varying movements of Taoist Tai Chi. Instructors often explain postures by referring to a foundation exercise. The 108 forms shown below were originally developed by Yang Chengfu, published in 1931 and 1934 and are commonly referred to as traditional Yang Style Tai Chi Chuan.[6][7][8]

The main foundations include:

Form list[edit]

The 108 movements of the Taoist Tai Chi set are:[10]

1. Opening of Tai Chi
2. Left Grasp Bird's Tail
3. Grasp Bird's Tail
4. Single Whip
5. Step Up and Raise Hands
6. White Stork Spreads Wings
7. Brush Knee (left)
8. Strum the Pei Pa
9. Brush Knee and Twist Step (left)
10. Brush Knee and Twist Step (right)
11. Brush Knee (left)
12. Strum the Pei Pa
13. Brush Knee and Twist Step (left)
14. Chop with Fist
15. Step Up, Deflect, Parry, Punch
16. Appear to Close Entrance
17. Cross Hands
18. Carry Tiger to Mountain
19. Whip Out Diagonally
20. Fist Under Elbow
21. Go Back to Ward Off Monkey (right)
22. Go Back to Ward Off Monkey (left)
23. Go Back to Ward Off Monkey (right)
24. Flying at a Slant
25. Step Up and Raise Hands
26. White Stork Spreads Wings
27. Brush Knee (left)
28. Push Needle to Sea Bottom
29. Fan Penetrates through the Back
30. Turn and Chop with Fist
31. Step Up, Deflect, Parry, Punch
32. Step Up to Grasp Bird's Tail
33. Single Whip
34. Move Hands Like Clouds (five times)
35. Single Whip
36. Reach Up to Pat Horse
37. Separate Foot to Right
38. Separate Foot to Left
39. Turn and Kick
40. Brush Knee and Twist Step (left)
41. Brush Knee and Twist Step (right)
42. Step Up and Punch
43. Turn and Chop with Fist
44. Step Up, Deflect, Parry, Punch
45. Right Foot Kick
46. Hit Tiger at Left
47. Hit Tiger at Right
48. Right Foot Kick
49. Strike Ears with Fists
50. Left Foot Kick
51. Turn and Kick
52. Chop with Fist
53. Step Up, Deflect, Parry, Punch
54. Appear to Close Entrance
55. Cross Hands
56. Carry Tiger to Mountain
57. Whip Out Horizontally
58. Parting Wild Horse's Mane (right)
59. Parting Wild Horse's Mane (left)
60. Parting Wild Horse's Mane (right)
61. Parting Wild Horse's Mane (left)
62. Parting Wild Horse's Mane (right)
63. Left Grasp Bird's Tail
64. Step Up to Grasp Bird's Tail
65. Single Whip
66. Fair Lady Works Shuttles (left)
67. Fair Lady Works Shuttles (right)
68. Fair Lady Works Shuttles (left)
69. Fair Lady Works Shuttles (right)
70. Left Grasp Bird's Tail
71. Step Up to Grasp Bird's Tail
72. Single Whip
73. Move Hands Like Clouds (seven times)
74. Single Whip
75. Creeping Low Like a Snake
76. Golden Cock Stands on One Leg (left)
77. Golden Cock Stands on One Leg (right)
78. Go Back to Ward Off Monkey (right)
79. Go Back to Ward Off Monkey (left)
80. Flying at a Slant
81. Step Up and Raise Hands
82. White Stork Spreads Wings
83. Brush Knee (left)
84. Push Needle to Sea Bottom
85. Fan Penetrates through the Back
86. White Snake Turns and Puts Out Tongue
87. Step Up, Deflect, Parry, Punch
88. Step Up to Grasp Bird's Tail
89. Single Whip
90. Move Hands Like Clouds (three times)
91. Single Whip
92. Reach Up to Pat Horse
93. Cross Hands to Penetrate
94. Turn and Kick
95. Chop with Fist
96. Brush Knee and Punch
97. Step Up to Grasp Bird's Tail
98. Single Whip
99. Creeping Low Like a Snake
100. Step Up to Seven Stars
101. Retreat to Ride Tiger
102. Turn Around to Sweep Lotus
103. Draw Bow to Shoot Tiger
104. Chop with Fist
105. Step Up, Deflect, Parry, Punch
106. Appear to Close Entrance
107. Cross Hands
108. Closing of Tai Chi

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b LaRoche, Nadine (2008). "Taoist Tai Chi: A Slow, Gentle Stretch into Good Health". Retrieved 2008-02-11. 
  2. ^ a b Lastman, Mel (2003). ""Taoist Tai Chi Awareness Day"". Retrieved 2008-02-11. 
  3. ^ a b c Chen, Y.K.: Tai-Chi Ch'uan - Its Effects and Practical Applications, pages 10-12. Newcastle Publishing, 1979. ISBN 0-87877-043-7
  4. ^ a b c Zhou, Dahong, M.D.: The Chinese Exercise Book, pages 19-22. Hartley & Marks Publishing, 1984. ISBN 0-88179-005-2
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Panter, John & Rick Davis: The Art of Taoist Tai Chi - Cultivating Mind and Body, Second Edition 1992, The Philosophy of Taoist Tai Chi: Cultivating Body and Mind by Karen Laughlin & Eva Wong, pages 11-14. Taoist Tai Chi Society of Canada, 1992. ISBN 0-9694684-0-7
  6. ^ a b Yang Chengfu (1931), Taijiquan Shiyongfa (Application methods of Taijiquan)
  7. ^ a b Yang Chengfu (1934), Taijiquan Tiyong Quanshu (Complete Book of the Essence and Applications of Taijiquan)
  8. ^ a b Yang Chengfu and Louis Swaim, tr. (2005). The Essence and Applications of Taijiquan. North Atlantic Books. ISBN 978-1-55643-545-4.
  9. ^ a b c d e Panter, John & Rick Davis: The Art of Taoist Tai Chi - Cultivating Mind and Body, Second Edition 1992, pages 16-18. Taoist Tai Chi Society of Canada, 1992. ISBN 0-9694684-0-7
  10. ^ Panter, John & Rick Davis: The Art of Taoist Tai Chi - Cultivating Mind and Body, Second Edition 1992, pages 19 and subsequent. Taoist Tai Chi Society of Canada, 1992. ISBN 0-9694684-0-7

References[edit]

External links[edit]