Talking in Your Sleep (The Romantics song)

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"Talking in Your Sleep"
Single by The Romantics
from the album In Heat
B-side"I'm Hip"
Released1983
GenreNew Wave, rock
LabelNemperor Records
Writer(s)Canler, Skill, Palmar, Solley, Marinos
ProducerPeter Solley
The Romantics singles chronology
Music sample
 
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"Talking in Your Sleep"
Single by The Romantics
from the album In Heat
B-side"I'm Hip"
Released1983
GenreNew Wave, rock
LabelNemperor Records
Writer(s)Canler, Skill, Palmar, Solley, Marinos
ProducerPeter Solley
The Romantics singles chronology
Music sample
"Talking in Your Sleep"
Single by Bucks Fizz
from the album I Hear Talk
B-side"Don't Think You're Fooling Me"
Released17 August 1984
Format7" single, 12" single, EP
GenrePop
Length4.18
LabelRCA
Writer(s)Canler, Skill, Palmar, Solley, Marinos
ProducerAndy Hill
Bucks Fizz singles chronology
"Rules of the Game"
(1983)
"Talking in Your Sleep"
(1984)
"Golden Days"
(1984)

"Talking in Your Sleep" is a popular song by American rock band The Romantics. It was a US hit in 1983 and became a UK hit the following year for British band Bucks Fizz.

The song is in natural minor.[1]

Contents

Song history

The song appeared on the Romantics' 1983 album In Heat and was the Romantics' biggest chart hit, garnering substantial radio airplay and sales. The song reached #3 on the Billboard Hot 100 in February 1984. It also went to #1 on the Hot Dance Club Play chart in the U.S., where it remained on top for two weeks. In Australia, Talking in Your Sleep climbed to #14 on the Australian Singles Chart (Kent Music Report). The song's music video, widely aired at the time on MTV and elsewhere, featured the band performing while surrounded by standing, but seemingly sleeping women who were dressed in lingerie, pajamas, and other sleepwear.

Chart positions

CountryPeak
position
US (Billboard Hot 100)3
Australia14

Bucks Fizz version

The single was unsuccessful in the UK, but a year later, the song became well-known when pop group Bucks Fizz covered it and reached No.15 on the UK singles chart.[2] Their version was produced by Andy Hill and featured on their fourth album, I Hear Talk.[3][4] The single was the group's first for nine months and became their biggest hit since "When We Were Young", a year previously. It was also released as a limited-edition EP, which included the live tracks "Twentieth Century Hero" and a cover of Chris de Burgh's "Don't Pay the Ferryman". The B-side, "Don't Think You're Fooling Me" was written and produced by band member Bobby G.

Track listing

7" vinyl

  1. "Talking in Your Sleep" (Canler / Skill / Palmar / Solley / Marinos) (4.18)
  2. "Don't Think You're Fooling Me" (Bobby G) (3.50)

12" vinyl

  1. "Talking in Your Sleep" (extended mix) (8.39)
  2. "Don't Think You're Fooling Me" (3.50)

Limited edition EP

  1. "Talking in Your Sleep (4.18)
  2. "Don't Think You're Fooling Me" (3.50)
  3. "Twentieth Century Hero" (Live) (Andy Hill / Pete Sinfield) (3.20)
  4. "Don't Pay the Ferryman" (Live) (Chris de Burgh) (3.56)

Chart positions

CountryPeak
position
UK [5]15
Ireland [6]14
Poland [7]22

In popular culture

The song is one of the 1980s tunes that can be heard in the arcade game compilation Namco Museum: 50th Anniversary Arcade Collection, for the PS2, Xbox, GameCube and PC.

The popular Canadian teen drama Degrassi: The Next Generation, which is known for naming each episode after a 1980s hit song, named a 7th-season episode after this song.

The song "November 18th" by Drake uses a DJ Screw beat which samples "Talking In Your Sleep"

The song "Secrets" by American rapper Snoop Dogg featuring Kokane interpolates "Talking in Your Sleep", from his album Malice n Wonderland.

Filipino rapper Andrew E.'s song "Honey" uses the bassline of this song, and also contains interpolations.

The song is featured in the Knight Rider episode 3.04 'Knights of the Fast Lane'.

References

Preceded by
"Let the Music Play" by Shannon
Billboard Hot Dance Club Play number-one single (The Romantics version)
December 10, 1983 – December 17, 1983
Succeeded by
"Say It Isn't So" by Hall & Oates