Talk:Hollywood Foreign Press Association

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

 
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Film(Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Film. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the project and see lists of open tasks and regional and topical task forces. To use this banner, please refer to the documentation. To improve this article, please refer to the guidelines.
Start-Class article Start This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
Checklist icon
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the American cinema task force.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the Film awards task force.
 
Note icon
This article needs an appropriate infobox template.
WikiProject Awards and prizes(Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Awards and prizes, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of awards and prizes on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start This article has been rated as Start-Class on the quality scale.
 Low This article has been rated as Low-importance on the importance scale.
 
WikiProject Television(Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Television, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of television on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

Article is lacking details, criticisms and controversies[edit]

This article is lacking details, criticisms and controversies that are easy to document by citing reputable sources. Here are a few examples, all several years old. I'll get around to incorporating them into the article at some point. 67.100.123.202 (talk) 16:30, 13 December 2007 (UTC).

"Golden Globes Group Seeks More Respect —and Money" (from 2002)[edit]

(http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn?pagename=article&contentId=A9699-2002Dec18)

"Golden Shutterbug" (from 2003)[edit]

An interview with the then-86-year-old HFPA member Anita Weber, still an active member

(http://www.filmstew.com/ShowArticle.aspx?ContentID=6711)

The truth behind the Golden Globes (from 2003)[edit]

Details, mostly but not all criticisms, from the documentary The Golden Globes: Hollywood's Dirty Little Secret

(http://www.cnn.com/2003/SHOWBIZ/Movies/12/12/goldenglobes.ap/)

Golden Globes: Hollywood's Dirty Little Secret[edit]

Review of the documentary

(http://www.thehollywoodreporter.com/thr/reviews/review_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=2048237)

Need for expansion for balance[edit]

Does anyone else think this article needs to be expanded for balance? LA Movie Buff (talk) 06:02, 4 June 2009 (UTC)

Badly formatted text move to here[edit]

I have removed the following text from the article because it appeared to be a bad cut-and-paste job from elsewhere (leading spaces were causing every paragraph to be rendered as preformatted text). Interested editors can look this over (copyvio?) and add back the material (with proper wiki syntax) that belongs in the article. - dcljr (talk) 23:40, 11 February 2010 (UTC)

The Hollywood Foreign Press Association is a group of working journalists who cover movies and movie stars for a variety of outlets, ranging from national newspapers to film titles to entertainment guides. (Screen International). Their publications include leading newspapers and magazines in Europe, Asia, Australasia and Latin America, ranging from Le Figaro in France, L'Espresso in Italy to Vogue in Germany as well as the China Times and the pan-Arabic magazine Kul Al Osra.

The group’s annual Golden Globe Awards have enabled the non-profit organization to donate more than $10.5 million in the past fifteen years to entertainment-related charities, as well as funding scholarships and other programs for future film and television professionals. In the year 2009 the donation was more than 1.2 million dollars, the largest tally ever distributed in the organization's history. (Daily Variety)

Known worldwide for its glittering Golden Globe Awards ceremony held every January and its multi-million dollar donations to charity, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association had humble origins that stemmed solely from a group of journalists' desire to efficiently and accurately cover all aspects of the world of entertainment (Who Makes the Golden Globes Go Around?) .

The association was founded in the early 1940s by a group of Los Angeles-based foreign journalists in an attempt to gain more clout with the studios and make it easier to obtain access to stars. It now comprises 89 members from 55 different countries. All have to submit clippings of their work every year to justify their membership. (London Daily Telegraph)

The organization’s first awards presentation for distinguished achievements in the film industry took place in early 1944 with an informal ceremony at 20th Century Fox. There, Jennifer Jones was awarded Best Actress honors for “The Song of Bernadette,” which also won for Best Film, while Paul Lukas took home Best Actor laurels for “Watch on the Rhine.” Awards were presented in the form of scrolls.

The following year members came up with the idea of presenting winners with a golden globe encircled with a strip of motion picture film, and mounted on a pedestal.

In 2012 differing philosophies among members created a schism within the organization, resulting in a split into two separate groups -- The Hollywood Foreign Correspondents Association and the Foreign Press Association of Hollywood.. The separation ended in 1955 when the journalists reunited under the collective title “The Hollywood Foreign Press Association” with firm guidelines and requirements for membership. (Who Makes the Golden Globes Go Around?)

In 1955 the Golden Globes began honoring achievements in television as well as in film. The first honorees in the Best Television Show category that year were “Dinah Shore,” “Lucy & Desi,” “The American Comedy” and “Davy Crockett.” In 2007, The Golden Globes initiated the category “Best Animated Feature Film” and the first year nominees were “Cars,” “Happy Feet” and “Monster House.”

Today, the Golden Globes recognize achievements in 25 categories; 14 in motion pictures and 11 in television.

The Golden Globes evening has long been known as a giant party; a star-filled, champagne-and-cocktail-fuelled orgy of congratulations, back-patting and table-hopping where the world’s leading actors, actresses and directors relish the informality of an event where there is always a feeling that anything can happen.

In previous years Jack Nicholson mooned the audience, Renee Zellweger was in the ladies room when she should have been on stage picking up her Golden Globe and Ving Rhames insisted on passing his Golden Globe on to Jack Lemmon because, he said, he was more deserving of it.

But in recent years the Globes have come to be viewed not only as a riotous night out for Hollywood’s elite, but as a vital part of the film industry, second in importance only to the Oscars and having a great impact on a film’s financial success. (London Daily Telegraph).

There have been whispers that votes can be bought by expensive gifts and all a studio needs to do is throw a party at which voters can mix with the stars. That may have been so in the past, but nothing could be further from the truth now. (London Daily Telegraph).

The group has had an overhaul in credibility since it infamously awarded Pia Zadora a best newcomer Globe in 1981, a prize forever tainted because it was associated with a junket to Las Vegas paid for by a producer of the film who also happened to be Zadora’s husband. (Screen International January 14 2010)

Since NBC began televising the Globes in the mid 1990s the rules have tightened and members must now sign an agreement that they will not receive valuable gifts. Presents that were deemed too valuable, such as a Coach watch from Sharon Stone and a dvd player from Chris Rock, were immediately returned.

Even invitations to parties are strictly vetted, and if they are seen to be aimed at influencing Golden Globe votes, they are declined.

Each year HFPA members interview more than 400 actors, directors, writers and producers, as well as reporting from film sets and seeing more than 300 films. Members also attend film festivals in other countries in order to seek out interesting and innovative foreign language films and establish cultural bonds with directors, actors, jurors and fellow journalists around the world. Membership meetings are held monthly and the officers and directors are elected annually. A maximum of five journalists are admitted to the organization each year. All members are accredited by the Motion Picture Association of America.