Tabernacle Township, New Jersey

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Tabernacle Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Tabernacle
Motto: Gateway to the Pines
Tabernacle Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Tabernacle Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°49′06″N 74°39′05″W / 39.818276°N 74.651454°W / 39.818276; -74.651454Coordinates: 39°49′06″N 74°39′05″W / 39.818276°N 74.651454°W / 39.818276; -74.651454[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyBurlington
IncorporatedMarch 22, 1901
Government[6]
 • TypeTownship
 • MayorStephen Lee (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • AdministratorDouglas A. Cramer[4]
 • ClerkLaShawn R. Barber[5]
Area[2]
 • Total49.614 sq mi (128.501 km2)
 • Land49.120 sq mi (127.221 km2)
 • Water0.494 sq mi (1.280 km2)  1.00%
Area rank33rd of 566 in state
5th of 40 in county[2]
Elevation[7]69 ft (21 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total6,949
 • Estimate (2012[11])6,987
 • Rank320th of 566 in state
25th of 40 in county[12]
 • Density141.5/sq mi (54.6/km2)
 • Density rank527th of 566 in state
36th of 40 in county[12]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code08088[13]
Area code(s)609 exchanges: 268, 801, 859[14]
FIPS code3400572060[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID0882081[17][2]
Websitewww.townshipoftabernacle-nj.gov
 
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Tabernacle Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Tabernacle
Motto: Gateway to the Pines
Tabernacle Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Tabernacle Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°49′06″N 74°39′05″W / 39.818276°N 74.651454°W / 39.818276; -74.651454Coordinates: 39°49′06″N 74°39′05″W / 39.818276°N 74.651454°W / 39.818276; -74.651454[1][2]
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyBurlington
IncorporatedMarch 22, 1901
Government[6]
 • TypeTownship
 • MayorStephen Lee (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • AdministratorDouglas A. Cramer[4]
 • ClerkLaShawn R. Barber[5]
Area[2]
 • Total49.614 sq mi (128.501 km2)
 • Land49.120 sq mi (127.221 km2)
 • Water0.494 sq mi (1.280 km2)  1.00%
Area rank33rd of 566 in state
5th of 40 in county[2]
Elevation[7]69 ft (21 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total6,949
 • Estimate (2012[11])6,987
 • Rank320th of 566 in state
25th of 40 in county[12]
 • Density141.5/sq mi (54.6/km2)
 • Density rank527th of 566 in state
36th of 40 in county[12]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code08088[13]
Area code(s)609 exchanges: 268, 801, 859[14]
FIPS code3400572060[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID0882081[17][2]
Websitewww.townshipoftabernacle-nj.gov

Tabernacle Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 6,949[8][9][10] reflecting an decline of 221 (-3.1%) from the 7,170 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 190 (-2.6%) from the 7,360 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Tabernacle was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 22, 1901, from portions of Shamong Township, Southampton Township and Woodland Township.[19]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Tabernacle Township as its 23rd best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[20] New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Tabernacle Township as its 6th best place to live in its 2010 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.[21] In 2009, it was rated the #1 small town by South Jersey Magazine.[22]

History[edit]

Before 1900[edit]

The area that is now Tabernacle was inhabited by Lenni Lenape Native Americans. In 1778, John and David Brainerd came to the area and erected a church to convert the local Native Americans to Christianity. The church was called Tabernacle In The Wilderness. In 1803, William Wilkins acquired land from Hosea Moore to build Tabernacle Cemetery, next to the church.[23]

The church was originally used as a schoolhouse but in 1856, the one-room Union School was built on the future site of Tabernacle Town Hall to serve the children of the community. As the community grew, a second schoolhouse was built in the vicinity of the other school. In 1860, Gilbert Knight built the Pepper-Knight House next to the Union Schoolhouse. It was later sold to the Pepper family who turned the property over to the Tabernacle Historic District following Clara Pepper's death in 1987. In the 1880s there were problems at the Tabernacle, so a new church was built on the spot. It was called the Tabernacle Methodist Episcopal Church, which still stands today.[24]

Turn of the twentieth century[edit]

On March 22, 1901, Tabernacle was incorporated as a township by an act of New Jersey State Legislature from portions of Shamong Township, Southampton Township and Woodland Township.[19]

On July 13, 1928, Emilio Carranza (known as the Lindbergh of Mexico) was flying his plane from New York City to Mexico when he crashed in the middle of a storm over Tabernacle. The Carranza Monument was built with funds from Mexican schoolchildren, Hampton Gates Road was renamed Carranza Road for the pilot.[23]

In 1910, the Union Schoolhouse was demolished and Tabernacle Town Hall was erected on the site. For the Friendship Schoolhouse, 1917 was the last school year because the enrollment and dwindled to four pupils as more began attending the Sequoia school, further south on Carranza Road. In 1936 it was moved down the road next to the Sequoia School. In the 1950s, Tabernacle Elementary School was built on New Road and Olson Middle School (formerly Tabernacle Middle School) was built across the road in 1968. Tabernacle School District renamed its school after Kenneth R. Olson following his death in 1990. In 2003, Seneca High School was built to serve high school students from Tabernacle, Shamong, Woodland, and Southampton.

Suburbanization[edit]

In 1970, Tabernacle's population was 2,103, but by 1980, it had almost tripled to 6,236, reflecting rapid suburbanization of Philadelphia in South Jersey. Around the same time, the population of many other nearby towns boomed. Tabernacle's population reached a high in 1990 at 7,362 inhabitants and has continued to drop gradually. In 2000 there were 7,170 residents in the township and the population dropped to 6,949 in the 2010 Census.

Geography[edit]

Tabernacle Township is located at 39°49′06″N 74°39′05″W / 39.818276°N 74.651454°W / 39.818276; -74.651454 (39.818276,-74.651454). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 49.614 square miles (128.501 km2), of which, 49.120 square miles (127.221 km2) of it was land and 0.494 square miles (1.280 km2) of it (1.00%) was water.[1][2]

The township borders Washington Township, Woodland Township, Southampton Township, Medford Township, and Shamong Township.

The township is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve.[25] All of the township is included in the state-designated Pinelands Area, which includes portions of Burlington County, along with areas in Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties.[26]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
1910487
1920431−11.5%
19304606.7%
19404906.5%
19501,034111.0%
19601,62156.8%
19702,10329.7%
19806,236196.5%
19907,36018.0%
20007,170−2.6%
20106,949−3.1%
Est. 20126,987[11]0.5%
Population sources: 1910-2000[27]
1910-1920[28] 1910[29] 1910-1930[30]
1930-1990[31] 2000[32][33] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 6,949 people, 2,375 households, and 1,978 families residing in the township. The population density was 141.5 per square mile (54.6 /km2). There were 2,445 housing units at an average density of 49.8 per square mile (19.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 95.80% (6,657) White, 1.38% (96) Black or African American, 0.07% (5) Native American, 0.69% (48) Asian, 0.06% (4) Pacific Islander, 0.94% (65) from other races, and 1.06% (74) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.76% (192) of the population.[8]

There were 2,375 households of which 34.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.1% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.7% were non-families. 13.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.92 and the average family size was 3.20.[8]

In the township, 24.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 21.4% from 25 to 44, 35.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.8 years. For every 100 females there were 101.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.8 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $101,053 (with a margin of error of +/- $15,205) and the median family income was $107,179 (+/- $7,238). Males had a median income of $47,947 (+/- $13,091) versus $40,231 (+/- $18,026) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $36,726 (+/- $3,161). About 1.1% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.4% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[34]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 7,170 people, 2,346 households, and 2,010 families residing in the township. The population density was 145.0 people per square mile (56.0/km²). There were 2,385 housing units at an average density of 48.2 per square mile (18.6/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.29% White, 2.09% African American, 0.10% Native American, 0.73% Asian, 0.31% from other races, and 0.49% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.48% of the population.[32][33]

There were 2,346 households out of which 41.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 77.6% were married couples living together, 5.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 14.3% were non-families. 11.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.03 and the average family size was 3.28.[32][33]

In the township the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 29.8% from 45 to 64, and 7.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 102.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.5 males.[32][33]

The median income for a household in the township was $76,432, and the median income for a family was $86,729. Males had a median income of $58,148 versus $31,250 for females. The per capita income for the township was $27,874. About 1.1% of families and 2.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.1% of those under age 18 and 6.0% of those age 65 or over.[32][33]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Tabernacle Town Hall.jpg

Tabernacle Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters At-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6] At an annual reorganization meeting held during the first week of January after each election, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2013, members of the Tabernacle Township Committee are Mayor Stephen Lee, IV (R, term on committee and as mayor ends December 31, 2013), Deputy Mayor Joseph Yates, IV (R, 2013), Joseph Barton (R, 2015), Kimberly A. "Kim" Brown (R 2014) and Richard Franzen (R, 2015).[35][36][37][38]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Tabernacle Township is located in the 3rd Congressional District[39] and is part of New Jersey's 9th state legislative district.[9][40][41] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Tabernacle Township had been in the 8th state legislative district.[42]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Jon Runyan (R, Mount Laurel Township).[43] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[44][45] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[46][47]

For the 2014-15 Session, the 9th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Christopher J. Connors (R, Lacey Township) and in the General Assembly by DiAnne Gove (R, Long Beach Township) and Brian E. Rumpf (R, Little Egg Harbor Township).[48] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[49] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[50]

Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[51] The board choose a director and deputy director from among its seven members at an annual reorganization meeting held in January.[51] As of 2013, Burlington County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Joseph B. Donnelly (R, 2013; Cinnaminson Township),[52] Deputy Director Leah Arter (R, 2014; Moorestown Township),[53] Aimee Belgard (D, 2015; Edgewater Park Township),[54] Joseph Howarth (R, 2014; Evesham Township)[55] and Joanne Schwartz (D, 2015; Southampton Township).[56][51]

Education[edit]

Friendship School

The Tabernacle School District serves public school students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[57]) are Tabernacle Elementary School[58] for grades PreK-4 (469 students) and Kenneth R. Olson Middle School[59] for grades 5-8 (393 students).[60]

Public school students in Tabernacle Township in ninth through twelfth grades attend Seneca High School located in Tabernacle Township, which serves students in ninth through twelfth grade from Shamong, Southampton, Tabernacle and Woodland Townships.[61][62] The school is part of the Lenape Regional High School District. The district also serves students from Evesham Township, Medford Lakes, Medford Township, Mount Laurel Township, Shamong Township, Tabernacle Township and Woodland Township.[63]

Students from Springfield Township, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[64]

Transportation[edit]

The township had a total of 89.17 miles (143.51 km) of roadways, of which 71.63 miles (115.28 km) are maintained by the municipality, 14.00 miles (22.53 km) by Burlington County and 3.54 miles (5.70 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[65]

The only two major roads that pass through are CR 532 thru the central part and U.S. Route 206 in the west.

The Atlantic City Expressway, Garden State Parkway, Interstate 295 and New Jersey Turnpike are all two towns away.

There are only two traffic lights in Tabernacle, both on US Route 206.[22]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Tabernacle Township include:

Points of interest[edit]

Carranza Memorial

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Township Administrator, Tabernacle Township. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  5. ^ [1], Tabernacle Township. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 103.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Tabernacle, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Tabernacle township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 2, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 6. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Tabernacle township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed April 2, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 9, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Tabernacle, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed April 2, 2012.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Tabernacle, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed December 2, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  19. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 99. Accessed April 2, 2012.
  20. ^ "Best Places To Live - The Complete Top Towns List 1-100", New Jersey Monthly, February 21, 2008. Accessed February 24, 2008.
  21. ^ "Best Places To Live 2010", New Jersey Monthly, June 22, 2010. Accessed June 22, 2010.
  22. ^ a b Tabernacle: Tops in Small Towns, Copy of article from South Jersey magazine at the Tabernacle Township website Accessed April 2, 2012.
  23. ^ a b Home page, Tabernacle Township. Accessed January 22, 2012.
  24. ^ Tabernacle Methodist Episcopal Church, The New Jersey Churchscape. Accessed January 22, 2012.
  25. ^ The Pinelands National Reserve, New Jersey Pinelands Commission. Accessed December 2, 2013.
  26. ^ Pinelands Municipalities, New Jersey Pinelands Commission, April 2003. Accessed December 2, 2013.
  27. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Burlington County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  28. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  29. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  30. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  31. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed August 31, 2012.
  32. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Tabernacle Township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 21, 2013.
  33. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Tabernacle township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 21, 2013.
  34. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Tabernacle township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed April 2, 2012.
  35. ^ 2013 Township Committee, Tabernacle Township. Accessed December 2, 2013.
  36. ^ November 6, 2012 Summary Report Burlington County Amended Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed December 2, 2013.
  37. ^ November 8, 2011 Summary Report Burlington County Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed December 2, 2013.
  38. ^ 2010 Certified Burlington Co. General Election Winners, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed December 2, 2013.
  39. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 65, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 65, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  44. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  45. ^ via Associated Press. "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in", NJ.com, October 31, 2013. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  46. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  47. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  48. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 24, 2014.
  49. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  51. ^ a b c Staff. Meet the Freeholders, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  52. ^ Joseph B. Donnelly, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  53. ^ Leah Arter, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  54. ^ Aimee Belgard, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  55. ^ Joseph Howarth, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  56. ^ Joanne Schwartz, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  57. ^ School Data for the Tabernacle School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 21, 2013.
  58. ^ Tabernacle Elementary School, Tabernacle School District. Accessed July 29, 2013.
  59. ^ Kenneth R. Olson Middle School, Tabernacle School District. Accessed July 29, 2013.
  60. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Tabernacle School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 29, 2013.
  61. ^ Seneca High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 2, 2013. "ATTENDANCE AREA: Shamong, Southampton, Tabernacle and Woodland Townships"
  62. ^ High School Sending Districts, Burlington County Public Library, backed up by the Internet Archive as of September 27, 2006. Accessed December 2, 2013.
  63. ^ Lenape Regional High School District 2013 Report Card District Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 2, 2013. "The Lenape Regional High School District serves the eight municipalities of Evesham, Medford, Mount Laurel, Shamong, Southampton, Tabernacle and Woodland Townships and Medford Lakes Borough."
  64. ^ Why Choose BCIT?, Burlington County Institute of Technology. Accessed December 2, 2013.
  65. ^ Burlington County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed December 2, 2013.
  66. ^ Staff. "Pinelands water unusual", Courier-Post, September 10, 2004. Accessed February 10, 2011. "Howard P. Boyd, who has written three books about the Pinelands, is struck by the clarity of cedar water when viewed in small quantities... Now a resident of Tabernacle he likes everything about the unique region."
  67. ^ Staff. "Doolittle Selected 41st Overall in MLB Draft, Guyer Picked in Fifth Round: Doolittle goes to Oakland Athletics, Guyer selected by Chicago Cubs", CBS Sports, June 7, 2007. Accessed February 11, 2011. "Virginia first baseman/pitcher Sean Doolittle (Tabernacle, N.J.) was selected in the supplemental first round (41st overall) of the Major League Baseball First-Year Player Draft Thursday by the Oakland Athletics, while outfielder Brandon Guyer was a fifth round pick (157th overall) by the Chicago Cubs."
  68. ^ Bodnar, Jason. "Shawnee grad bets on childhood dream through poker series", Burlington County Times, November 18, 2004. "Two decades after she was filming Shana's Variety Hour in the basement of her Tabernacle home..."
  69. ^ Emilio Carranza Crash Monument, RoadsideAmerica.com, undated. Accessed July 24, 2008.
  70. ^ History, Delanco Camp. Accessed April 2, 2012.
  71. ^ Batona Trail New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Accessed August 31, 2012.

External links[edit]