Syracuse Hancock International Airport

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Syracuse Hancock International Airport
SyracuseAirportSign.jpg
IATA: SYRICAO: KSYR
SYR is located in New York
SYR
Location of the Syracuse Hancock International Airport
Summary
Airport typePublic
OperatorCity of Syracuse Department of Aviation
ServesSyracuse, New York
LocationDeWitt / Salina / Cicero, Onondaga County, New York
Elevation AMSL421 ft / 128 m
Coordinates43°06′40″N 076°06′23″W / 43.11111°N 76.10639°W / 43.11111; -76.10639 (Syracuse Hancock International Airport)Coordinates: 43°06′40″N 076°06′23″W / 43.11111°N 76.10639°W / 43.11111; -76.10639 (Syracuse Hancock International Airport)
Runways
DirectionLengthSurface
ftm
10/289,0032,744Asphalt
15/337,5002,286Asphalt
Statistics (Ending 2007, 2010)
Operations (2007)107,706
Based aircraft (2007)98
Passengers (2010)2,064,399
Source: Federal Aviation Administration[1], ACI[2]
 
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Syracuse Hancock International Airport
SyracuseAirportSign.jpg
IATA: SYRICAO: KSYR
SYR is located in New York
SYR
Location of the Syracuse Hancock International Airport
Summary
Airport typePublic
OperatorCity of Syracuse Department of Aviation
ServesSyracuse, New York
LocationDeWitt / Salina / Cicero, Onondaga County, New York
Elevation AMSL421 ft / 128 m
Coordinates43°06′40″N 076°06′23″W / 43.11111°N 76.10639°W / 43.11111; -76.10639 (Syracuse Hancock International Airport)Coordinates: 43°06′40″N 076°06′23″W / 43.11111°N 76.10639°W / 43.11111; -76.10639 (Syracuse Hancock International Airport)
Runways
DirectionLengthSurface
ftm
10/289,0032,744Asphalt
15/337,5002,286Asphalt
Statistics (Ending 2007, 2010)
Operations (2007)107,706
Based aircraft (2007)98
Passengers (2010)2,064,399
Source: Federal Aviation Administration[1], ACI[2]
For the United States Air Force use of this facility, see Hancock Field Air National Guard Base

Syracuse Hancock International Airport (IATA: SYRICAO: KSYR) is a joint civil-military public airport located 4 NM (7.4 km; 4.6 mi) northeast[1] of Syracuse, in Onondaga County, New York, off of Interstate 81 near Mattydale, New York. The main terminal complex is located at the eastern end of Colonel Eileen Collins Boulevard.

Contents

History

In 1927 Syracuse mayor Charles Hanna felt that his city needed an airport. A location at Amboy in the town of Camillus, New York was purchased for $50,000, and by 1928, the "Syracuse City Airport at Amboy" was handling airmail. At the end of World War II the United States Army Air Corps leased their bomber base near Mattydale, New York to the city. On September 17, 1949, the Clarence E. Hancock Airport opened to the public using a renovated machine shop as a terminal, and replaced the airport at Amboy. The airport at that time was equipped with three 5,500-foot (1,700 m) long and 300-foot (91 m) wide concrete runways. American, Buffalo, Colonial and Robinson Airlines were the first airlines to operate at the airport, and American Airlines still does to this day.

A United Airlines Boeing 737 at Hancock International Airport in 1993

In 2004, Syracuse Mayor Matthew Driscoll created a television and internet campaign, titled Fly Syracuse,[3] in an attempt to lower fares and increase passenger traffic at the airport. The airport has since experienced a period of growth thanks to the efforts of local business contributions toward the campaign.

C&S is providing professional design and construction inspection/observation services for the construction of the Syracuse Hancock International Airport terminal security and access improvement project, which is a 147,000-square-foot (13,700 m2) renovation design project with an estimated cost of $63 million. The most critical components of the project include: post check-in TSA baggage handling, improved passenger screening, and sustainability. This project is 100 percent funded by PFC's (Passenger Facility Charges) meaning that no tax dollars will be used to construct this project. For more information refer to www.syrairport.org.[4]

Operations

An American Airlines McDonnell Douglas MD-80 being deiced at Terminal B. In the background is a Northwest Airlines DC-9 parked at Terminal A.
FAA diagram of Syracuse Hancock International Airport (SYR)

The Syracuse region receives an average 114 inches (289.56 cm) of snow annually. On average, the airport is closed less than 24 hours annually due to snowfall. The airport has received the Balchen/Post Award for Excellence in the Performance of Snow and Ice Control a total of seven times, most recently in 2006.[1] Runway 10/28 has a Category II Instrument Landing System (ILS).

Airlines and destinations

AirlinesDestinations
Air Canada operated by Air GeorgianToronto-Pearson
American EagleChicago-O'Hare
Delta Air LinesAtlanta
Delta Connection operated by Chautauqua AirlinesNew York-LaGuardia
Delta Connection operated by ExpressJetDetroit, New York-LaGuardia
Delta Connection operated by GoJet AirlinesNew York-LaGuardia
Delta Connection operated by Pinnacle AirlinesAtlanta, Detroit, Minneapolis/St. Paul, New York-JFK, New York-LaGuardia
JetBlue AirwaysNew York-JFK, Orlando
United Express operated by CommutAirCleveland, Newark, Washington-Dulles
United Express operated by ExpressJet AirlinesChicago-O'Hare, Newark, Washington-Dulles
United Express operated by GoJet AirlinesChicago-O'Hare
United Express operated by SkyWest AirlinesChicago-O'Hare
US AirwaysCharlotte
Seasonal: Philadelphia
US Airways Express operated by Air WisconsinPhiladelphia, Washington-National
US Airways Express operated by Mesa AirlinesCharlotte
US Airways Express operated by Piedmont AirlinesBoston, Philadelphia
US Airways Express operated by Republic AirlinesCharlotte, Philadelphia, Washington-National

Cargo operations

AirlinesDestinations
FedEx ExpressMemphis, Newark, Burlington (VT)
UPSLouisville, Philadelphia

Flight schools

Syracuse Hancock International is home to the third component of [2] Waypoint Flight School - which was once the former ExecAir Flight Training Center.

Runways

In the 1950s, the primary east-west instrument runway (10-28) was extended from its original 5500 foot length by the mid-1950s to 6863 feet and a few years later to 8000 feet. In 1958, the instrument landing system to runway 28 was augmented with a 3000 foot high-intensity approach lighting system. With the use of the Century series fighter aircraft used by the Air Force, around 1960 the main east-west runway was extended again, this time to 9005 feet. The runway was strengthened in the early 1960s for the new heavier Boeing 707 aircraft. In the 1960s, runway centerline lighting was added to the main runway along with touchdown zone lighting on the runway 28 end.

Around the time of building the new terminal building, runway 6-24 was shortened to 3261 feet to allow construction of the entrance road to the new terminal facilities and continued to be used as a general aviation runway into the 1970s, however it was abandoned after that. Runway 14-32 was lengthened in the 1960s by about 500 feet to 6000 feet. Another extension brought it to 6480 feet and sometime around 1980 was lengthened to its present length of 7500 feet. The crosswind runway was also renumbered from 14-32 to 15-33. An instrument landing system was added to runway 10 with medium intensity approach lighting with runway alignment indicator lights. Runway 15 was equipped with a medium intensity approach lighting system.[5]

See also

References

External links