Suthep Thaugsuban

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Suthep Thaugsuban
สุเทพ เทือกสุบรรณ

MPCh MWM
Suthep royal.jpg
Deputy Prime Minister of Thailand (Security affairs)
In office
20 December 2008 – 9 August 2011
Prime MinisterAbhisit Vejjajiva
Personal details
Born(1949-07-07) 7 July 1949 (age 64)
Surat Thani Province, Thailand
NationalityThai
Political partyDemocrat Party
Domestic partnerSrisakul Promphan[1]
Alma materChiang Mai University,
Middle Tennessee State University
ProfessionPolitician
ReligionBuddhism
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Suthep Thaugsuban
สุเทพ เทือกสุบรรณ

MPCh MWM
Suthep royal.jpg
Deputy Prime Minister of Thailand (Security affairs)
In office
20 December 2008 – 9 August 2011
Prime MinisterAbhisit Vejjajiva
Personal details
Born(1949-07-07) 7 July 1949 (age 64)
Surat Thani Province, Thailand
NationalityThai
Political partyDemocrat Party
Domestic partnerSrisakul Promphan[1]
Alma materChiang Mai University,
Middle Tennessee State University
ProfessionPolitician
ReligionBuddhism

Suthep Thaugsuban (Thai: สุเทพ เทือกสุบรรณ; RTGS: Suthep Thueaksuban, [sù.tʰêːp tʰɯ̂ːak.sù.ban]) (born 7 July 1949, Tha Sathon, Phunphin District, Surat Thani Province) is a Thai politician, and a former Member of Parliament for Surat Thani province. Until 2011, he was secretary-general of the Democrat Party and a deputy prime minister under the unelected Abhisit Vejjajiva Democrat-led government. He resigned his seat in Parliament in November 2013 to become leader of the People's Democratic Reform Committee,[2] which is conducting mass protests to try to unseat the government of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, whom they accuse of being corrupt and a puppet for her self-exiled brother, Thaksin Shinawatra.

1995 to present corruption scandal[edit]

As part of the Sor Por Kor 4-01 (สปก.4-01) land reform scheme, Suthep gave title deeds to 592 plots of land in Khao Sam Liam, Kamala and Nakkerd hills of Phuket province to 489 farmers. It was later found that members of 11 wealthy families in Phuket were among the recipients. Suthep addressed a huge crowd in his Surat Thani constituency a month before a no-confidence debate and called on his supporters to march on Bangkok in the hundreds of thousands to defend his reputation.[3] The scandal led Prime Minister Chuan Leekpai of the Democrat Party to dissolve the House of Representatives in July 1995 in order to avoid the no-confidence debate.[4] In subsequent elections, Thai Nation Party won a majority, leading to the downfall of Chuan Leekpai's Democrat Party-led government.

2009 disqualification as MP[edit]

In 2009, Suthep was accused of violating the Constitution of Thailand by holding equity in a media firm that had received concessions from the government. Under the 1997 Constitution of Thailand, which Suthep had supported, Members of Parliament are banned from holding stakes in companies which have received government concessions. In July 2009, the Election Commission announced that it would seek a ruling by the Constitutional Court to disqualify Suthep.

Suthep held a press conference a day later, announcing his decision to resign from Parliament. Suthep's resignation as an MP did not affect his status as a Deputy Prime Minister and as a Cabinet member. If his case had been submitted to the Constitution Court, he would have been suspended from duty as Deputy Prime Minister. He insisted his resignation was not a proof that he had done anything wrong but that he was worried about status as Deputy Prime Minister.[5]

2011 elections[edit]

In the general election on 3 July 2011, the Democrats were defeated, receiving 34% of the votes in contrast to the Pheu Thai Party's 47%. In response, Suthep immediately stepped down as the party's secretary-general. When the government of Pheu Thai Party-leader Yingluck Shinawatra took office on 9 August 2011, his term as deputy prime minister ended.

2013 Protests[edit]


References[edit]

  1. ^ Sinlapalawan, Budsarakham (15 March 2009). "Fast-tracked to fame". The Nation (Thailand). 
  2. ^ "Suthep, eight other Democrat MPs resign". The Nation (Thailand). 11 November 2013. Retrieved 7 December 2013. 
  3. ^ McCargo, Duncan (February 2004). "Southern Thai Politics: A Preliminary Overview". University of Leeds. p. 15. Retrieved 28 July 2011. 
  4. ^ "September 13, 1992: Democrats win election". The Nation (Thailand). 10 September 2007. 
  5. ^ Srivalo, Piyanart (17 July 2009). "Suthep resigns as MP". The Nation (Thailand). 

See also[edit]