Supai, Arizona

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Supai, Arizona
CDP
Church building in Supai
Location in Coconino County and the state of Arizona
Coordinates: 36°13′27″N 112°41′38″W / 36.22417°N 112.69389°W / 36.22417; -112.69389
CountryUnited States
StateArizona
CountyCoconino
Area
 • Total1.7 sq mi (4.4 km2)
 • Land1.7 sq mi (4.4 km2)
 • Water0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation3,195 ft (974 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total208
 • Density120/sq mi (47/km2)
Time zoneMST (UTC-7)
ZIP code86435
Area code928
FIPS code04-71230
GNIS feature ID0012003
 
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Supai, Arizona
CDP
Church building in Supai
Location in Coconino County and the state of Arizona
Coordinates: 36°13′27″N 112°41′38″W / 36.22417°N 112.69389°W / 36.22417; -112.69389
CountryUnited States
StateArizona
CountyCoconino
Area
 • Total1.7 sq mi (4.4 km2)
 • Land1.7 sq mi (4.4 km2)
 • Water0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation3,195 ft (974 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total208
 • Density120/sq mi (47/km2)
Time zoneMST (UTC-7)
ZIP code86435
Area code928
FIPS code04-71230
GNIS feature ID0012003

Supai (Havasupai: Havasuuw) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Coconino County, Arizona, United States, within the Grand Canyon.

As of the 2010 census, the CDP had a population of 208.[1] The capital of the Havasupai Indian Reservation, Supai is currently one of only two places in the United States where mail is still carried out by mules, the other being Phantom Ranch in the Grand Canyon.[2]

It is the most remote community in the lower 48 states.[3] The only way to get to it is to take a helicopter or to hike or ride a mule along the Havasupai Trail. Supai is 8 miles (13 km) from the nearest road. There are no cars in the community.[2]

Recent history[edit]

Tourists and some residents were evacuated from Supai and surrounding area on August 17 and 18, 2008,[4] due to flooding of Havasu Creek complicated by the failure of the earthen Redlands Dam after a night of heavy rainfall. Evacuees were taken to Peach Springs, Arizona.[5] More heavy rains were expected and a flash flood warning was put into effect, necessitating the evacuation, according to the National Park Service.[6] The floods were significant enough to attract coverage from international media.[5][7]

Damage to the trails, bridges, and campground was severe enough for Havasupai to close visitor access to the village, campground, and falls until the spring of 2009.[8] Further flooding in 2010 resulted in damage to repairs made previously and closures effective until May 2011. Those returning will find yet more changes to the once familiar landmarks near the water.

Geography and climate[edit]

The Wigleeva rock formations watch over Supai

Located within the Grand Canyon, Supai is only accessible by foot, pack animal or helicopter. Mail and package delivery to the community is thus delayed; delivery time for mail from Bullhead City, Arizona, via the United States Postal Service is at least a week because it is carried out by mule.[9][10]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 1.7 square miles (4.4 km2), all land. It lies 3,195 feet (974 m) above sea level.

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Supai, 1956–1987
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)73
(23)
80
(27)
90
(32)
96
(36)
104
(40)
112
(44)
116
(47)
110
(43)
105
(41)
97
(36)
80
(27)
70
(21)
116
(47)
Average high °F (°C)53.3
(11.8)
60.5
(15.8)
67.5
(19.7)
76.2
(24.6)
85.9
(29.9)
96.3
(35.7)
99.8
(37.7)
96.9
(36.1)
90.4
(32.4)
77.9
(25.5)
63.8
(17.7)
53.7
(12.1)
76.9
(24.9)
Average low °F (°C)28.0
(−2.2)
33.2
(0.7)
38.0
(3.3)
44.1
(6.7)
51.9
(11.1)
60.6
(15.9)
66.1
(18.9)
63.9
(17.7)
57.0
(13.9)
46.4
(8)
36.5
(2.5)
29.1
(−1.6)
46.2
(7.9)
Record low °F (°C)−1
(−18)
5
(−15)
13
(−11)
23
(−5)
24
(−4)
36
(2)
41
(5)
42
(6)
34
(1)
19
(−7)
11
(−12)
−4
(−20)
−4
(−20)
Precipitation inches (mm)0.61
(15.5)
0.63
(16)
0.88
(22.4)
0.38
(9.7)
0.41
(10.4)
0.26
(6.6)
1.24
(31.5)
1.42
(36.1)
0.65
(16.5)
0.61
(15.5)
0.72
(18.3)
0.75
(19)
8.54
(216.9)
Snowfall inches (cm)0.4
(1)
0.2
(0.5)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.1
(0.3)
0.6
(1.5)
1.2
(3)
Avg. precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in)44532156333444
Source: WRCC[11]


Demographics[edit]

As of the census of 2010,[1] there were 208 people and 43 households. The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.6% Native American, 0.5% White, 0.5% Other, and 2.4% of mixed race. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.3% of the population.

There were 43 households out of which 34.9% were husband-wife families living together, 32.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 14.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 18.6% were non-families. 16.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 2.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 4.84.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 30.8% under the age of 16, 10.4% from 16 to 21, 54.8% from 21 to 65, and 4.8% who are 65 years of age or older. The median age was 25.2 years. 48.6% of the population was male; 51.4% was female.

Access[edit]

Supai can be reached by hiking 8 miles (13 km), descending 2,004 feet (611 m) in elevation from Hualapai Hilltop through the Hualapai Canyon.[12] Alternatively, the AirWest Helicopters service schedules flights from Hualapai Hilltop to Supai. Hualapai Hilltop is located about 70 miles (110 km) from the community of Peach Springs, along paved BIA Road 18.

Services[edit]

Mule train from Supai carrying U.S. Postal Service boxes

Supai has one small, air-conditioned lodge (Havasupai Lodge), a convenience store and a cafe.[13]

All mail leaving Supai has a special postmark showing that it was sent out by mule train.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Supai CDP, Arizona". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c Bill Geist (2000-01-23). "Special Delivery: Mail By Mule". CBS News Sunday Morning. CBS News. Retrieved 2009-09-30. 
  3. ^ "USDA Admin Visits Supai Tribe". U.S. Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2013-05-02. 
  4. ^ Chris Dolmetsch (2008-08-18). "Grand Canyon Flooding Forces Evacuations, Searches (Update2)". Bloomberg News. Retrieved 2009-09-30. 
  5. ^ a b Rajesh Mirchandani (2008-08-17). "Dam evacuations in Grand Canyon". BBC. Retrieved 2008-08-17. 
  6. ^ Associated Press (2008-08-17). "Hikers located after Grand Canyon flood". msnbc.msn.com. Retrieved 2009-09-30. 
  7. ^ "Honderden geëvacueerd uit Grand Canyon". Dutch online news site nu.nl. 2008-08-18. Retrieved 2009-09-30. 
  8. ^ "Camping". HavasupaiTribe.com. 2008-08-18. Retrieved 2009-09-30. 
  9. ^ D. Varty, personal communication, 2004
  10. ^ United States Postal Service. "History of the United States Postal Service 1775-1993". USPS. Archived from the original on 2006-08-22. Retrieved 2006-08-26. 
  11. ^ "Station Name: SUPAI, ARIZONA (028343)". Western Regional Climate Center. Retrieved 2013-04-26. 
  12. ^ Witt, Greg (2010). Exploring Havasupai: A Guide to the Heart of the Grand Canyon. Birmingham, Alabama: Menasha Ridge Press. p. 76. ISBN 978-0-89732-654-4. 
  13. ^ Witt, Greg (2010). Exploring Havasupai: A Guide to the Heart of the Grand Canyon. Birmingham, Alabama: Menasha Ridge Press. pp. 88–89. ISBN 978-0-89732-654-4. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 36°14′06.21″N 112°41′18.97″W / 36.2350583°N 112.6886028°W / 36.2350583; -112.6886028