Sump pump

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A small submersible AC sump pump with a garden hose connector

A sump pump is a pump used to remove water that has accumulated in a water collecting sump basin, commonly found in the basement of homes. The water may enter via the perimeter drains of a basement waterproofing system, funnelling into the basin or because of rain or natural ground water, if the basement is below the water table level.

Sump pumps are used where basement flooding happens regularly and to remedy dampness where the water table is above the foundation of a home. Sump pumps send water away from a house to any place where it is no longer problematic, such as a municipal storm drain or a dry well.

Pumps may discharge to the sanitary sewer in older installations. Once considered acceptable, this practice may now violate the plumbing code or municipal bylaws, because it can overwhelm the municipal sewage treatment system. Municipalities urge homeowners to disconnect and reroute sump pump discharge away from sanitary sewers. Fines may be imposed for noncompliance. Many homeowners have inherited their sump pump configurations and do not realise that the pump discharges to the sewer. If the discharge is fed to a laundry sink in the basement, it's likely going to the sewer.

Usually hardwired into a home's electrical system, sump pumps may have a battery backup. The home's pressurized water supply powers some pumps, eliminating the need for electricity at the expense of using potable water, potentially making them more expensive to operate than electrical pumps and creating an additional water disposal problem. Since a sump basin may overflow if not constantly pumped, a backup system is important for cases when the main power is out for prolonged periods of time, as during a severe storm.

There are generally two types of sump pumps — pedestal and submersible. The pedestal pump's motor is mounted above the sump, where it is more easily serviced, but is also more conspicuous. The pump impeller is driven by a long, vertical extension shaft and the impeller is in a scroll housing in the base of the pump. The submersible pump is entirely mounted inside the sump, and is specially sealed to prevent electrical short circuits. There is great debate about which variety of sump pump is better. Pedestal sump pumps usually last longer (25 to 30 years) if they are installed properly and kept free of debris. They are less expensive and easier to remove. Submersible pumps will only last 5 to 15 years. They are more expensive to purchase but can take up debris without clogging.[1][2]

Sump pump systems are also utilized in industrial and commercial applications to control water table-related problems in surface soil. An artesian aquifer or periodic high water table situation can cause the ground to become unstable due to water saturation. As long as the pump functions, the surface soil will remain stable. These sumps are typically ten feet in depth or more; lined with corrugated metal pipe that contains perforations or drain holes throughout. They may include electronic control systems with visual and audible alarms and are usually covered to prevent debris and animals from falling in.

Components[edit]

Modern sump pump components in the United States are standardized. They consist of::

Pump selection[edit]

The selection of a sump pump will rest heavily on the application in which it will be used. To select the appropriate sump pump, consider the following:[3]

Backup components[edit]

A secondary, typically battery-powered sump pump can operate if the first pump fails. A battery-powered secondary pump requires the following components in parallel with the above others:

Alternative sump pump systems can be driven by municipal water pressure. Water-powered sump pumps are similar to backup-battery-driven systems with a separate pump, float and check valves. One can also use an ejector pump that uses an ordinary garden hose to supply high-pressure water and another garden hose to carry the water away. Although such ejector pumps waste water and are relatively inefficient, they have the advantage of having no moving parts and offer the utmost in reliability.

If the backup sump system is rarely used, a component failure may not be noticed, and the system may fail when needed. Some battery control units test the system periodically and alert on failed electrical components.

A simple, battery-powered water alarm can be hung a short distance below the top of the sump to sound an alarm should the water level rise too high.

Maintenance[edit]

Sump basins and sump pumps must be maintained. Typical recommendations suggest examining equipment every year. Pumps running frequently due to higher water table, water drainage, or weather conditions should be examined more frequently. Sump pumps, being mechanical devices, will fail eventually, which could lead to a flooded basement and costly repairs. Redundancy in the system (multiple/secondary pumps) can help to avoid problems when maintenance and repairs are needed on the primary system.[4]

When examining a sump pump and cleaning it, dirt, gravel, sand, and other debris should be removed to increase efficiency and extend the life of the pump. These obstructions can also decrease the pump's ability to drain the sump, and can allow the sump to overflow. The check valve can also jam from the debris. Examine the discharge line opening, when applicable, to ensure there are no obstructions in the line. Even a partially obstructed discharge line can force a sump pump to work harder and increase its chance of overheating and failure.[5]

Float switches are used to automatically turn the sump pump on when filled to a preset level. Float switches must be clear of any obstructions within the tank. A float guard can be used to prevent the float switch from accidentally resting on the pump housing, and remaining on.[6]

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Pedestal Sump Pumps". Retrieved 2014 January 14. 
  2. ^ "Sump Pumps: The Differences Between Common Pump Models". Basement Health Pros. Retrieved 2014 January 14. 
  3. ^ Author unknown (Date unknown). Sump Pump Buying Guide. Retrieved from http://sump-pump.org/.
  4. ^ "Sump Pumps". Basement-repair.com. Retrieved 2013-09-17. 
  5. ^ Author unknown (Date unknown). Basement Troubleshooting Guide: Failing Sump Pumps. Retrieved from http://www.basement-repair.com/basement/basement-sumppump-problems.html.
  6. ^ Retrieved from http://www.http:/floatguard.com/float-guard-pictures.cfm[dead link].

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