Stuart Roosa

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Stuart Allen Roosa
Stuart Allen Roosa.jpg
NASA Astronaut
NationalityAmerican
StatusDeceased
Born(1933-08-16)August 16, 1933
Durango, Colorado
DiedDecember 12, 1994(1994-12-12) (aged 61)
Falls Church, Virginia
Other occupationTest Pilot
RankColonel, USAF
Time in space9d 00h 01m
Selection1966 NASA Group
MissionsApollo 14
Mission insigniaApollo 14-insignia.png
 
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Stuart Allen Roosa
Stuart Allen Roosa.jpg
NASA Astronaut
NationalityAmerican
StatusDeceased
Born(1933-08-16)August 16, 1933
Durango, Colorado
DiedDecember 12, 1994(1994-12-12) (aged 61)
Falls Church, Virginia
Other occupationTest Pilot
RankColonel, USAF
Time in space9d 00h 01m
Selection1966 NASA Group
MissionsApollo 14
Mission insigniaApollo 14-insignia.png

Stuart Allen Roosa (August 16, 1933 – December 12, 1994) was a NASA astronaut, who was the command module pilot for the Apollo 14 mission. The mission lasted from January 31 to February 9, 1971 and was the third mission to land astronauts (Alan Shepard and Edgar Mitchell) on the Moon. While Shepard and Mitchell spent two days on the lunar surface, Roosa conducted experiments from orbit in the command module "Kitty Hawk". He was one of only 24 people to travel to the Moon.

Early life[edit]

Roosa was born in Durango, Colorado, and grew up in Claremore, Oklahoma. He attended Oklahoma State University and the University of Arizona.

Career[edit]

He was a graduate of the Aviation Cadet Program at Williams Air Force Base, Arizona, where he received his flight training commission in the Air Force.

Roosa undergoes final space suit check prior to liftoff of Apollo 14.

Roosa was one of 19 people selected as part of the astronaut class of 1966 and served as a member of the astronaut support crew for the Apollo 9 mission. On Apollo 14 he spent 33 hours in solo orbit around the Moon, conducting an extensive series of experiments.

Following Apollo 14, Roosa served as backup command module pilot for Apollo 16 and Apollo 17, and based on crew rotations, would probably have commanded one of the last Apollo missions had it not been cancelled. He was assigned to the Space Shuttle program until his retirement as a colonel from the Air Force in 1976. After leaving NASA and the Air Force, he held a number of positions in international and U.S. businesses, and became owner and president of Gulf Coast Coors in 1981. His daughter Rosemary was named CEO of Gulf Coast Coors several years later.

Honors and awards[edit]

Roosa's honors include the NASA Distinguished Service Medal; the Johnson Space Center Superior Achievement Award (1970); the Air Force Command Pilot Astronaut Wings; the Air Force Distinguished Service Medal; the Arnold Air Society's John F. Kennedy Award (1971); the City of New York Gold Medal (1971); the American Astronautical Society's Flight Achievement Award (1971); the Order of Tehad (1973); and the Order of the Central African Empire (1973). Additionally, an elementary school in Claremore, Oklahoma is named in his honor. Roosa earned a Program for Management Development (PMD) degree from Harvard Business School, Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1973 and an honorary LL.D. from University of St. Thomas, Houston in 1971.

Death[edit]

Roosa's Tombstone in Arlington National Cemetery.

On December 12, 1994, Stuart Roosa died at age 61 in Washington D.C. from complications of pancreatitis. He was survived by his wife Joan, three sons and a daughter, and five grandchildren. (Son Jack Roosa attended the USAF Academy and became an F-16 squadron commander.) He is buried in section 7A of Arlington National Cemetery.[citation needed] His wife Joan died on October 30, 2007 in Gulfport, Mississippi. She was interred at Arlington Cemetery with her husband.[citation needed]

In the miniseries From the Earth to the Moon (1998), Roosa was played by George Newbern.[1] The book Smoke Jumper, Moon Pilot (2011), by Willie G. Moseley, is a biography on Roosa's life.[2]

In 2013, Roosa's photo appeared in USAA insurance television ads in the United States.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Credits, From the Earth to the Moon (1998 miniseries)
  2. ^ Moseley, Willie G. (2011-10-31). Smoke Jumper, Moon Pilot. Acclaim Press, 31 October 2011. ISBN 978-1935001768.
  3. ^ USAA (2013-10-02). "Mine Was Earned | USAA Auto Insurance". USAA commercial, 2 October 2013. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJlRx_OQo9M.

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]