StickyKeys

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StickyKeys is an accessibility feature to help Windows users who have physical disabilities, but it is also used by others as a means to reduce repetitive strain injury (or a syndrome called the Emacs Pinky). It essentially serializes keystrokes instead of pressing multiple keys at a time: StickyKeys allows the user to press and release a modifier key, such as Shift, Ctrl, Alt, or the Windows key, and have it remain active until any other key is pressed.

History[edit]

Microsoft first introduced StickyKeys with Windows 95. The feature is also used in later versions of Windows.

Enabling[edit]

To enable this shortcut, the Shift key must be pressed 5 times in short succession.

This feature can also be turned on and off via the Accessibility icon in the Windows Control Panel.

To turn off once enabled, just simply press 3 or more of the Sticky Keys (Ctrl, Alt, Shift, Windows Button) at the same time.

Issues[edit]

Over the years, this feature has posed difficulties for users who naturally use the Shift key heavily, such as gamers. When a user presses the Shift key 5 times within a certain period of time, the shortcut activation popup will be placed above all other applications. This can be fixed by going into the control panel and disabling the window. [1]

Sounds[edit]

Sticky keys makes an alert sound on Windows computers and laptops, but on Mac or Apple computers, it makes a silent tapping sound. On Mac, sticky keys is pressed only once on the shift key.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fingerblaster 9000, The. "TF2 Sticky Key/Keyboard Glitch?". Steam Forums. Retrieved 2013-11-30.