Steve Jones (golfer)

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Steve Jones
Personal information
Full nameSteven Glen Jones
Born(1958-12-27) December 27, 1958 (age 53)
Artesia, New Mexico
Height6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight200 lb (91 kg; 14 st)
Nationality United States
ResidenceTempe, Arizona
Career
CollegeUniversity of Colorado
Turned professional1981
Current tour(s)Champions Tour
Former tour(s)PGA Tour
Professional wins11
Number of wins by tour
PGA Tour8
Other3
Best results in Major Championships
(Wins: 1)
Masters TournamentT20: 1990
U.S. OpenWon: 1996
The Open ChampionshipT16: 1990
PGA ChampionshipT9: 1988
Achievements and awards
PGA Tour Comeback
Player of the Year
1996
 
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Steve Jones
Personal information
Full nameSteven Glen Jones
Born(1958-12-27) December 27, 1958 (age 53)
Artesia, New Mexico
Height6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight200 lb (91 kg; 14 st)
Nationality United States
ResidenceTempe, Arizona
Career
CollegeUniversity of Colorado
Turned professional1981
Current tour(s)Champions Tour
Former tour(s)PGA Tour
Professional wins11
Number of wins by tour
PGA Tour8
Other3
Best results in Major Championships
(Wins: 1)
Masters TournamentT20: 1990
U.S. OpenWon: 1996
The Open ChampionshipT16: 1990
PGA ChampionshipT9: 1988
Achievements and awards
PGA Tour Comeback
Player of the Year
1996

Steven Glen Jones (born December 27, 1958) is an American professional golfer who is best known for winning the U.S. Open in 1996.

Contents

Early life and education

Jones was born in Artesia, New Mexico. He was a semi-finalist at the U.S. Junior Amateur in 1976. He attended the University of Colorado and turned professional in 1981.

Golf career

Early years

In the early years of his professional career, Jones did not have much success. He played the PGA Tour in 1982, but only made three cuts. His first top 10 finish on the PGA Tour came at the Texas Open in September 1985, and in 1986 he won the PGA Tour Qualifying Tournament to retain his card for the following year. This marked the beginning of a more successful period.

1987-1994

Jones won on the PGA Tour for the first time at the 1988 AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. 1989 was the most victorious year of his career with three PGA Tour wins, and he finished a career best eighth on the money list.

In November 1991 Jones suffered ligament and joint damage to his left ring finger in a dirtbike accident, and he missed almost three years of play as a professional. He played in only two events in 1994.

Comeback

Jones began his comeback in earnest in 1995, when he had two top 10 finishes. In 1996 he achieved three top ten places by May, but he was still a rank outsider when he picked up the U.S. Open title that June, which was the only major championship of his career. He defeated Tom Lehman and Davis Love III by one stoke, and was the first sectional qualifier to win the tournament since Jerry Pate in 1976.

Jones played for the United States in the 1996 World Cup of Golf. He won two more PGA Tour events in 1997; in 1998, he won another, his last to date.

1999 - 2007

Since 1999, Jones has slipped steadily down the money list. He remained exempt on the PGA Tour through 2006 because a major tournament win carried a 10-year exemption when he won in 1996. He missed part of 2003 and all of 2004 after undergoing surgery for tennis elbow, but starting playing again in 2005.

Jones was captain's assistant for the United States team at the 2004 Ryder Cup.

In 2007, he played in nine PGA tour events and four Nationwide tour events in 2007, making the cut six times, with no top-25 finishes.[1]

Comeback (again)

In 2008 and 2009 Steve had surgeries for tennis elbow. He made his first full golf swings in January 2011.[2] In 2011, Jones returned to playing professional golf. In January, Jones played the Bob Hope Classic on the PGA Tour. He then began playing on the Champions Tour in April.[3]

Professional wins

PGA Tour wins (8)

Legend
Major championships (1)
Other PGA Tour (7)
No.DateTournamentWinning ScoreMargin of
Victory
Runner(s)-up
1Feb 7, 1988AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am-8 (74-64-70-74=280)PlayoffUnited States Bob Tway
2Jan 8, 1989MONY Tournament of Champions-9 (69-69-72-69=279)3 strokesSouth Africa David Frost, United States Jay Haas
3Jan 15, 1989Bob Hope Chrysler Classic-17 (76-68-67-63-69=343)PlayoffUnited States Paul Azinger, Scotland Sandy Lyle
4Jun 25, 1989Canadian Open-17 (67-64-70-70=271)2 strokesUnited States Clark Burroughs, United States Mark Calcavecchia,
United States Mike Hulbert
5Jun 16, 1996U.S. Open-2 (74-66-69-69=278)1 strokeUnited States Tom Lehman, United States Davis Love III
6Jan 26, 1997Phoenix Open-30 (62-64-65-67=258)11 strokesSweden Jesper Parnevik
7Sep 7, 1997Bell Canadian Open-13 (71-68-67-69=275)1 strokeAustralia Greg Norman
8Jul 12, 1998Quad City Classic-17 (64-65-68-66=263)1 strokeUnited States Scott Gump

PGA Tour playoff record (2-1)

No.YearTournamentOpponent(s)Result
11988AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-AmUnited States Bob TwayWon with birdie on second extra hole
21989Bob Hope Chrysler ClassicUnited States Paul Azinger, Scotland Sandy LyleWon with birdie on first extra hole
31990MCI Heritage Golf ClassicUnited States Larry Mize, United States Payne StewartStewart won with birdie on second extra hole

Other wins

Major championships

Wins (1)

YearChampionship54 HolesWinning ScoreMarginRunner(s)-up
1996U.S. Open1 shot deficit-2 (74-66-69-69=278)1 strokeUnited States Tom Lehman, United States Davis Love III

Results timeline

Tournament198719881989
The MastersDNPT30T31
U.S. OpenDNPDNPT46
The Open ChampionshipDNPDNPCUT
PGA ChampionshipT61T9T51
Tournament1990199119921993199419951996199719981999
The MastersT20CUTDNPDNPDNPDNPDNPCUTT26CUT
U.S. OpenT8CUTDNPDNPDNPDNP1T60CUTCUT
The Open ChampionshipT16T64DNPDNPDNPDNPCUTT48T57DNP
PGA ChampionshipCUTDNPDNPDNPDNPDNPCUTT41DNPCUT
Tournament2000200120022003200420052006
The MastersT25T27DNPDNPDNPDNPDNP
U.S. OpenT27T30CUTDNPDNPT57T32
The Open ChampionshipT31CUTT43DNPDNPDNPDNP
PGA ChampionshipT24DNPDNPDNPDNPDNPDNP

DNP = Did not play
CUT = missed the half-way cut
"T" indicates a tie for a place
Green background for wins. Yellow background for top-10

See also

References

External links