Steve Baker (motorcyclist)

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Steve Baker
23 Centennial Classic TT Assen 2010.jpg
Baker at the 2010 Centennial Classic TT
NationalityUnited States United States
BornSeptember 5, 1952
Bellingham, Washington
Motorcycle racing career statistics
Grand Prix motorcycle racing
Active years1977 - 1978
First race1977 500cc Venezuelan Grand Prix
Last race1978 500cc West German Grand Prix
Team(s)Yamaha, Suzuki
ChampionshipsFormula 750 - 1977
StartsWinsPodiumsPolesF. lapsPoints
200710122
 
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Steve Baker
23 Centennial Classic TT Assen 2010.jpg
Baker at the 2010 Centennial Classic TT
NationalityUnited States United States
BornSeptember 5, 1952
Bellingham, Washington
Motorcycle racing career statistics
Grand Prix motorcycle racing
Active years1977 - 1978
First race1977 500cc Venezuelan Grand Prix
Last race1978 500cc West German Grand Prix
Team(s)Yamaha, Suzuki
ChampionshipsFormula 750 - 1977
StartsWinsPodiumsPolesF. lapsPoints
200710122

Steve Baker (born September 5, 1952 in Bellingham, Washington) is an American former Grand Prix motorcycle roadracer. He was the first American to win a road racing world championship when he won the 1977 Formula 750 title.[1]

Baker began his career racing on the dirt track ovals of the Pacific Northwest.[1] He then switched to road racing and began competing in Canada, becoming a three-time Canadian champion.[1] His good results earned him a factory sponsored ride with the Yamaha factory team for the 1977 season.[1] He began the year by winning the prestigious Daytona 200 before traveling to Europe to compete in the world championships.[1][2][3]

Baker won the 1977 Formula 750 title and finished second to Barry Sheene in the 500cc world championship.[4][5] He was released by the Yamaha team after the season and competed in the 1978 championship on a privately supported Suzuki.[1] At the end of that season, Baker suffered a devastating accident at the Mosport circuit in Canada that left him with a broken arm and shattered his left leg. Afterwards, he decided to retire from competitive racing.[1]

After his racing career, Baker purchased a motorcycle dealership in his hometown of Bellingham.[1] He was inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1999.[1]

Motorcycle Grand Prix results [5][edit]

Position12345678910
Points1512108654321

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position)

YrClassTeam1234567891011RankPts
1977500ccYamahaVEN
2
AUT
DNF
GER
3
NAT
4
FRA
3
NED
5
BEL
2
SWE
3
FIN
12
CZE
DNF
GBR
2
2nd80
1978500ccSuzukiVEN
3
SPA
6
AUT
DNF
FRA
NS
NAT
4
NED
9
BEL
DNF
SWE
4
FIN
6
GBR
DNF
GER
7
7th42

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Steve Baker at the Motorcycle Hall of Fame". motorcyclemuseum.org. Retrieved 24 February 2012. 
  2. ^ "Daytona 200 winners". motorsportsetc.com. Retrieved 24 February 2012. 
  3. ^ 1977 Daytona 200 article in Sports Illustrated, March 21, 1977
  4. ^ Formula 750 world champions
  5. ^ a b "Steve Baker career statistics". motogp.com. Retrieved 24 February 2012. 

External links[edit]