Statue of a Fool

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"Statue of a Fool"
Single by Jack Greene
from the album Statue of a Fool
B-side"There's More to Love"
Released1969
Format7" single
GenreCountry
Length2:48
LabelDecca 32490
Writer(s)Jan Crutchfield
Producer(s)Owen Bradley
Jack Greene singles chronology
"Until My Dreams Come True"
(1969)
"Statue of a Fool'"
(1969)
"Back in the Arms of Love"
(1969)
 
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"Statue of a Fool"
Single by Jack Greene
from the album Statue of a Fool
B-side"There's More to Love"
Released1969
Format7" single
GenreCountry
Length2:48
LabelDecca 32490
Writer(s)Jan Crutchfield
Producer(s)Owen Bradley
Jack Greene singles chronology
"Until My Dreams Come True"
(1969)
"Statue of a Fool'"
(1969)
"Back in the Arms of Love"
(1969)
"Statue of a Fool"
Single by Brian Collins
from the album This Is Brian Collins
B-side"How Can I Tell Her (About You)"
Released1974
Format7" single
GenreCountry
Length3:04
LabelDot17499
Writer(s)Jan Crutchfield
Producer(s)Jim Foglesong[1]
Brian Collins singles chronology
"I Don't Plan on Losing You"
(1974)
"Statue of a Fool'"
(1974)
"That's the Way Love Should Be"
(1974)
"Statue of a Fool"
Single by Ricky Van Shelton
from the album RVS III
B-side"He's Got You"
ReleasedNovember 7, 1989[2]
Format7" single
RecordedJune 14, 1989[2]
GenreCountry
Length3:04
LabelColumbia Nashville 38-73077
Writer(s)Jan Crutchfield
Producer(s)Steve Buckingham
Ricky Van Shelton singles chronology
"Living Proof"
(1989)
"Statue of a Fool'"
(1989)
"I've Cried My Last Tear for You"
(1990)

"Statue of a Fool" is a song written by Jan Crutchfield and recorded by many country artists. It was first recorded in 1969 by country music artist Jack Greene where it was released as a single and became a number 1 hit. Brian Collins would record and release it in 1974 from his second album, This Is Brian Collins. It peaked at number 10 on the country charts. David Ruffin, formerly of The Temptations, also recorded a version of the song in 1975. Bill Medley, formerly of The Righteous Brothers, also released a rendition in 1979 that went to number 91 on the same chart. In 1989, it was recorded by country music artist Ricky Van Shelton, who released it as a single from the album, RVS III. It peaked at number 2 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart and hit #1 on the Canadian RPM country singles chart.

Chart performance[edit]

Jack Greene version[edit]

Chart (1969)Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs1
Canadian RPM Country Tracks3

Brian Collins version[edit]

Chart (1974)Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs10
Canadian RPM Country Tracks6

Bill Medley version[edit]

Chart (1979)Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs91

Ricky Van Shelton version[edit]

Chart (1989-1990)Peak
position
Canada Country Tracks (RPM)[3]1
US Hot Country Songs (Billboard)[4]2

Year-end charts[edit]

Chart (1990)Position
Canada Country Tracks (RPM)[5]39
US Country Songs (Billboard)[6]19

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.briancollinsmusic.net/#!biography/c1enr
  2. ^ a b Greatest Hits Plus (CD). Ricky Van Shelton. Columbia Records. 1992. 52753. 
  3. ^ "Top RPM Country Tracks: Issue 6704." RPM. Library and Archives Canada. February 17, 1990. Retrieved August 23, 2013.
  4. ^ "Ricky Van Shelton Album & Song Chart History" Billboard Hot Country Songs for Ricky Van Shelton.
  5. ^ "RPM Top 100 Country Tracks of 1990". RPM. December 22, 1990. Retrieved August 23, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Best of 1990: Country Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 1990. Retrieved August 23, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
"Running Bear"
by Sonny James
Billboard Hot Country Singles
number-one single
(Jack Greene version)

July 5–12, 1969
Succeeded by
"I Love You More Today"
by Conway Twitty
Preceded by
"Nobody's Home"
by Clint Black
RPM Country Tracks
number-one single
(Ricky Van Shelton version)

February 17, 1990
Succeeded by
"Southern Star"
by Alabama