St James's Church, Piccadilly

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St James's Church, Piccadilly
Current photo of St. James's Church
51°30′31″N 0°8′12″W / 51.50861°N 0.13667°W / 51.50861; -0.13667Coordinates: 51°30′31″N 0°8′12″W / 51.50861°N 0.13667°W / 51.50861; -0.13667
CountryUnited Kingdom
DenominationChurch of England
Websitewww.st-james-piccadilly.org
Architecture
Architect(s)Christopher Wren
Administration
DioceseLondon
 
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St James's Church, Piccadilly
Current photo of St. James's Church
51°30′31″N 0°8′12″W / 51.50861°N 0.13667°W / 51.50861; -0.13667Coordinates: 51°30′31″N 0°8′12″W / 51.50861°N 0.13667°W / 51.50861; -0.13667
CountryUnited Kingdom
DenominationChurch of England
Websitewww.st-james-piccadilly.org
Architecture
Architect(s)Christopher Wren
Administration
DioceseLondon

St James’s Church, Piccadilly, also known as St James's Church, Westminster, is an Anglican church on Piccadilly in the centre of London, UK. It was designed and built by Sir Christopher Wren.

The church is built of red brick with Portland stone dressings. The church’s interior has galleries on three sides supported by square pillars, and the nave has a barrel vault supported by Corinthian columns. The carved marble font and limewood reredos are both notable examples of the work of Grinling Gibbons.

History[edit]

Interior circa 1806
St James's Church interior at present

In 1662, Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans, was granted land for residential development on what was then the outskirts of London. He set aside land for the building of a parish church and churchyard on the south side of what is now Piccadilly. Christopher Wren was appointed the architect in 1672 and the church was consecrated on 13 July 1684 by Henry Compton, the Bishop of London. In 1685 the parish of St James was created for the church.

Samuel Clarke was rector from 1709 to 1729 and was one of the leading intellectual figures of eighteenth-century Britain. William Blake was baptised at the church in 1757. Leopold Stokowski was choirmaster from 1902 until 1905 when he left for a similar position in New York.

The church was severely damaged by enemy action in 1940, during the Second World War. Works of restoration were carried out by the architect Sir Albert Richardson. The church’s website carries a detailed history.[1]

Baptisms[edit]

St James's in 1815

Marriages[edit]

Burials[edit]

Concerts[edit]

Concerts are regularly held in the church.[3] Concerts have included performances by popular contemporary musicians such as REM,[4] the folk musician Laura Marling as part of her "church tour",[5] as well as the collegiate Indian-American music group Penn Masala.[6]

Outdoor art space[edit]

Hauser & Wirth, a contemporary art gallery, is running a programme of outdoor sculpture exhibitions in Southwood Garden in the grounds of the church. The first exhibition is of work by the Swiss sculptor Hans Josephsohn, running from September 2009 to January 2010.[7] Southwood Garden was created in the churchyard by Viscount Southwood after World War II as a garden of remembrance, "to commemorate the courage and fortitude of the people of London," and was opened by Queen Mary in 1946.[8]

Piccadilly Market[edit]

Piccadilly Market was established in 1981 and operates six days a week in the courtyard of St James's Church. Mondays: Food Market, 11 am –5 pm. Tuesdays: Antiques and Collectables Market, 10 am – 6 pm. Wednesday - Saturday: Arts and Craft Market, 10 am – 6 pm.

Present[edit]

Like many central London churches surrounded by commercial buildings and ever fewer local people, St James’s lost numbers and momentum in the 1960s and 70s. When, in 1980, Donald Reeves was offered the post of rector, the bishop allegedly said "I don’t mind what you do, just keep it open."[citation needed] During that decade and most of the 1990s numbers and activity grew, the clergy and congregation gaining a reputation for being a progressive, liberal and campaigning church. That has continued. The "congregation" rejects that description and prefers "community". It is centred on the Eucharist, the celebration of the principal Christian sacrament. It finds expression in a wide range of interest groups: spiritual explorers, labyrinth walking, Julian prayer meetings, the Vagabonds group (a lively discussion group which takes its name from a William Blake poem and in faithfulness to that text meets in a local alehouse), a LGBT group and many others. The community has actively supported, and supports, the ordination of women to all the orders of the church, the just treatment of asylum seekers and those living in poverty. It celebrates what it regards as the "radical welcome" found in the heart of the Gospels and attested to by the Incarnation.

See also[edit]

Sources[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "history". St-james-piccadilly.org. 1947-08-09. Retrieved 2010-05-08. 
  2. ^ Barbara Brandon Schnorrenberg, “Montagu, Elizabeth (1718–1800)”, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison (eds). Oxford: OUP, 2004.
  3. ^ Corinthian Chamber Orchestra One of the groups which gives concerts in the church
  4. ^ [http://www.st-james-piccadilly.org/EveningConcerts.html Evening Concerts Website detailing REM performance.
  5. ^ Laura Marling unveils church tour details. NME reveals details of Laura Marling's church tour.
  6. ^ http://ct.broadwayworld.com/printcolumn.php?id=188796
  7. ^ "Hauser & Wirth / St James's Church, Piccadilly". Glass Magazine. 2009-09-01. Retrieved 2009-09-07. 
  8. ^ "The Churchyard". The Survey of London: about St James's Church Piccadilly. 2008. Retrieved 2009-09-07. 

See also[edit]

External links[edit]