St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center

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St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital
Mount Sinai Health System
Roosevelt-hospital1.jpg
Geography
LocationNew York, New York, USA
Organisation
Care systemPrivate
Hospital typeTeaching Hospital
Affiliated universityIcahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Services
Beds1,076
History
Founded1979
Links
Websitehttp://www.wehealny.com
 
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St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital
Mount Sinai Health System
Roosevelt-hospital1.jpg
Geography
LocationNew York, New York, USA
Organisation
Care systemPrivate
Hospital typeTeaching Hospital
Affiliated universityIcahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Services
Beds1,076
History
Founded1979
Links
Websitehttp://www.wehealny.com
William J. Syms Operating Theatre built in 1892 at Roosevelt Hospital (last operation was 1941)
St. Luke's Hospital

St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, an academic affiliate of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, is a 1,076-bed, full-service community and tertiary care hospital serving New York City’s Midtown West, Upper West Side and parts of Harlem.

Its two hospital components which merged operations in 1979 are nearly 50 blocks apart on Manhattan's west side:

The hospital center is a member of the Mount Sinai Health System, a nonprofit hospital system formed by the merger of Continuum Health Partners and The Mount Sinai Medical Center in September 2013.

History[edit]

St. Luke's[edit]

St. Luke's was founded by William Augustus Muhlenberg, pastor of the Episcopal Church of the Holy Communion. St. Luke's first opened in 1858 at 54th Street and Fifth Avenue.

In 1896 it moved to 114th Street. It is across the street, to the east, from Columbia University’s campus and to the South it is flanked by the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine. The historic hospital building at Amsterdam Avenue and 114th Street was designed by prominent socialite architect Ernest Flagg. The chapel of that hospital has stained glass and is the work of the same architect.[1][2]

Woman's Hospital[edit]

Woman's Hospital was founded by doctor J. Marion Sims with financial backing from Sarah Platt Doremus, who ultimately became president of the Hospital.[3] From South Carolina, Sims had developed a revolutionary approach to treating vesico-vaginal fistulas, a catastrophic complication from obstructed childbirth. The Hospital was first located in a rented house at Madison Avenue and 29th Street. Dr. Thomas Addis Emmet, who served at the hospital, published the first comprehensive textbook in English on gynecology.[4]

In 1867 Woman's Hospital moved to a new location on Park Avenue, which is now the site of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. This had been the burial ground for New York in the 1832 cholera outbreak. 47,000 coffins were dug up to make way for the new construction.[4] In 1906 Woman's Hospital moved to 110th Street and Amsterdam. In 1953 it was merged with St. Luke's Hospital, forming St. Luke's Hospital Center. Finally, in 1965, it was moved to 114th Street and Amsterdam Avenue, just across the street from St. Luke's.[4]

Roosevelt Hospital[edit]

William J. Syms Operating Theater of Charles McBurney (surgeon) at Roosevelt Hospital

Roosevelt Hospital (named for its benefactor James H. Roosevelt who donated money for the first building in 1871) is located on 10th Avenue and 59th Street, two blocks west of Columbus Circle. The current 13-story Skidmore, Owings & Merrill designed facility was built in 1990.[5] The original hospital was on the same block but faced Ninth Avenue. Much of the original hospital, including the emergency room, was torn down to make way for two 49-story apartment buildings—One Columbus Place Tower I[6] and II. The oldest remaining component of the hospital is the William J. Syms Operating Theater that had a glass roof built in 1892.[7] It was named for a gun merchant who donated money for it. Its last operation was in 1941 and is now a New York City Landmark. It is still free standing even as the tower surrounds it.[8]

Emergency departments[edit]

William J. Syms Operating Theater at Roosevelt Hospital showing glass skylight that illuminated operations before incandescent lighting.

The Emergency Departments at both sites, staffed by 40 physicians board certified in emergency medicine and seven in pediatric emergency medicine, offer 24-hr specialized services for victims of sexual assaults. Both New York City Emergency Rooms have a 24-hour stroke team and Heart Attack (MI) Team. The St. Luke's Emergency Room has a 24-hour on-call cardiac catheterization lab for patients having heart attacks to immediately open up the clogged artery. The Emergency Department hosts a residency in Emergency Medicine with 42 physicians; a fellowship in global health led by Dr. Ramona Sunderwirth and affiliated with the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health; and a fellowship in emergency ultrasound. The Department has two board certified Clinical Toxicologists available for consultation 24 hours. Physicians in the Department are frequently featured on the major local and national television network news programs discussing medical issues affecting the community.

Residency programs[edit]

St. Luke's-Roosevelt sponsors 30 accredited residency training programs in every possible field of medicine but not Pediatrics, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Urology, Neurology, Family Medicine, Otolaryngology, nor fellowships in Rheumatology, Burn Surgery, Vitreoretinal Surgery, Pediatric Surgery, Gynecologic Oncology, Ocular Pathology, Multiple Sclerosis, Uveitis, Allergy Immunology, Sleep Medicine, Pediatric Cardiology, and many others.[9] The Department of Medicine trains 158 residents and an additional 39 fellows; one of the largest programs in New York State and in the top 10 largest nationally. Each program enjoys full accreditation from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the institution itself is accredited for the maximum 5 year cycle. The Internal Medicine Training Program is one of the most progressive programs in the country utilizing unique strategies to ensure that residents can learn from every patient. These innovations include a "drip system" for distributing admissions and no overnight call anywhere in the training program. In addition, the department limits the number of patients that can be carried by an intern to no more than 11. 83% of the programs in NY, NJ and all of New England still allow interns to carry 12 patients. The program also has its own "Simulation Lab" for training residents and the Program Director, Dr. Ethan Fried is the principal investigator for the New York State Near Miss Registry which is sponsored by the New York State Department of Health as a risk free, anonymous reporting system to record near miss medical errors and the barriers that kept these errors from reaching patients.

Management[edit]

The late Richard F. Daines, M.D., the former President and CEO of St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center served as New York State Commissioner of Health under Eliot Spitzer.

Frank Cracolici is the President and CEO of St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center.

Popular references[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ David W. Dunlap, From Abyssinian to Zion: A Guide to Manhattan's Houses of Worship. (New York: Columbia University Press, 2004.) p. 223.
  2. ^ Dolkart, Andrew S; Postal, Matthew A. (2004). Guide to New York City Landmarks. New York City Landmarks Preservation Committee. Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg (Author of Forward) (Third ed.). Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. p. 73. 
  3. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg Wilson, James Grant; Fiske, John, eds. (1900). "Doremus, Sarah Platt". Appletons' Cyclopædia of American Biography. New York: D. Appleton 
  4. ^ a b c "History Of The Department * New York City's St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology". Nywomenshealth.com. Retrieved 2010-03-18. 
  5. ^ Emporis GmbH. "St. Luke's / Roosevelt Hospital Center, Roosevelt Division, New York City, U.S.A.". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-03-18. 
  6. ^ Emporis GmbH. "One Columbus Place Tower I, New York City, U.S.A.". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-03-18. 
  7. ^ Norval White and Elliot Willensky, AIA Guide to New York City, rev. ed., (New York: Collier Books, 1978), p.146.
  8. ^ Gray, Christopher, Streetscape: The Syms Operating Theater; A Mildly Romanesque West Side Bargaining Chip", The New York Times, October 25, 1987
  9. ^ www.acgme.org
  10. ^ "Grover Washington, Jr." www.allmusic.com. Retrieved May 13, 2013.

External links[edit]