Spokane Coliseum

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Spokane Coliseum
The Boone Street Barn
SpokaneColiseum1a.jpg
View west from Howard Street
LocationW. Boone Ave. &
N. Howard St.
Spokane, Washington
Coordinates47°40′03″N 117°25′21″W / 47.6675°N 117.4225°W / 47.6675; -117.4225Coordinates: 47°40′03″N 117°25′21″W / 47.6675°N 117.4225°W / 47.6675; -117.4225
Capacity5,400
Construction
Broke groundSeptember 28, 1953 [1]
OpenedDecember 3, 1954
ClosedSpring 1995 (40 years)
DemolishedSpring-Summer 1995
Construction cost$2.5 million in 1954 [2][3]
Tenants
Gonzaga Bulldogs (NCAA) 1958-65, 1979–80
Spokane Flyers (WHL) 1980–81
Spokane Chiefs (WHL) 1985–95
 
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Spokane Coliseum
The Boone Street Barn
SpokaneColiseum1a.jpg
View west from Howard Street
LocationW. Boone Ave. &
N. Howard St.
Spokane, Washington
Coordinates47°40′03″N 117°25′21″W / 47.6675°N 117.4225°W / 47.6675; -117.4225Coordinates: 47°40′03″N 117°25′21″W / 47.6675°N 117.4225°W / 47.6675; -117.4225
Capacity5,400
Construction
Broke groundSeptember 28, 1953 [1]
OpenedDecember 3, 1954
ClosedSpring 1995 (40 years)
DemolishedSpring-Summer 1995
Construction cost$2.5 million in 1954 [2][3]
Tenants
Gonzaga Bulldogs (NCAA) 1958-65, 1979–80
Spokane Flyers (WHL) 1980–81
Spokane Chiefs (WHL) 1985–95

Spokane Coliseum (nicknamed The Boone Street Barn)[4][5] was an indoor arena in Spokane, Washington. Opened in late 1954,[2] it had a seating capacity of 5,400.

After more than a year of construction, the arena was dedicated on December 3, 1954, in a program headlined by Metropolitan Opera soprano Patrice Munsel, a Spokane native.[2][6][7] The largest crowds in its early years were for a Catholic Mass and stage shows by Lawrence Welk and Liberace, respectively.[7]

It was host to a number of teams, including the Spokane Chiefs of the WHL. The arena served as the home of the Gonzaga University basketball team, from its entry into NCAA Division I competition in 1958, until the opening of the on-campus John F. Kennedy Memorial Pavilion in 1965,[8] later the Charlotte Y. Martin Centre. The Bulldogs returned to the Coliseum in 1979, their first year in the West Coast Athletic Conference, for conference home games only[9] before returning to Kennedy Pavilion for the 1980–81 season.[10] They continued to use the Coliseum for occasional home games until its demise. The venue was used for some events of the 1990 Goodwill Games[11]

Replacement[edit]

During 1990, discussions for a new arena to replace the Spokane Coliseum began.[12] One factor that led to the idea included several damages to the arena which had a leaking roof and rusted boilers.[12] Another major issue was the size of Spokane Coliseum, which had then recently lost potential bookings from ZZ Top and New Kids on the Block due to its small size.[12]

The Spokane Coliseum was replaced by the Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena 19 years ago in 1995 and was demolished that spring and summer.[13] The space it occupied is directly north of the new arena, towards Boone Avenue, now a parking lot.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Emahiser, Bob (December 3, 1954). "Coliseum dedication gives reality to long-time city dream". Spoane Daily Chronicle. p. 13. 
  2. ^ a b c "8000 jam Coliseum for colorful dedication program". Spokesman-Review. December 4, 1954. p. 1. 
  3. ^ "$2,500,000 Coliseum opens tonight". Spokane Daily Chronicle. December 3, 1954. 
  4. ^ Foster, J. Todd (April 19, 1995). "Coliseum to live in hearts, homes". Spokesman-Review. p. A1. 
  5. ^ a b Bartel, Frank (March 20, 1995). "Coliseum should make good gravel". Spokesman-Review. p. A11. 
  6. ^ Bonino, Rick (December 3, 1984). "Bittersweet 30th birthday for Coliseum". Spokesman-Review. p. 1. 
  7. ^ a b Hill, Bob (November 12, 1964). "Coliseum playing major role here". Spokane Daily Chronicle. p. 1. 
  8. ^ Missildine, Harry (May 21, 1965). "Kennedy Pavilion heralds modern Gonzaga sports era". Spokesman-Review. p. 28. 
  9. ^ "Year-by-Year Results" (PDF). 2007 Gonzaga University Men's Basketball Media Guide. Gonzaga University Athletics. pp. 123–133. Retrieved 2007-06-03. 
  10. ^ "Through The Ages – Homes of the Bulldogs" (PDF). 2007 Gonzaga University Men's Basketball Media Guide. Gonzaga University Athletics. p. 108. Retrieved 2007-05-29. 
  11. ^ "The 1990 Goodwill Games are Coming to Spokane". Spokesman-Review. June 21, 1990. 
  12. ^ a b c Prager, Mike (October 27, 1990). "Spokane Coliseum not worth repairing, tax breakers say". Spokesman Review. p. B1. 
  13. ^ Johnson, Kristina (June 23, 1995). "Barn-razing". Spokesman-Review. p. B1. 

External link[edit]

Preceded by
Kelowna Memorial Arena
(as Kelowna Wings)
Home of the
Spokane Chiefs

1985–1995
Succeeded by
Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena