Southside (Birmingham)

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Southside
Birmingham Neighborhood
CountryUnited States
StateAlabama
Elevation659 ft (200.8632 m)
Coordinates33°30′2″N 86°48′00″W / 33.50056°N 86.80000°W / 33.50056; -86.80000
TimezoneCST (UTC-6)
 - summer (DST)CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP Codes35205
Area code205
 
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Highland Ave. Entrance to the Highland Park Neighborhood Area in Birmingham, AL.
Coordinates: 33°30′2″N 86°48′00″W / 33.50056°N 86.80000°W / 33.50056; -86.80000
Southside
Birmingham Neighborhood
CountryUnited States
StateAlabama
Elevation659 ft (200.8632 m)
Coordinates33°30′2″N 86°48′00″W / 33.50056°N 86.80000°W / 33.50056; -86.80000
TimezoneCST (UTC-6)
 - summer (DST)CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP Codes35205
Area code205

The historic Southside community is situated on the hilly and forested slopes of Red Mountain just south of Birmingham, Alabama's central business district. The neighborhood includes the landscape from Railroad Park to the crest of Red Mountain, and from Interstate 65 to U.S. Highway 31 (or "Red Mountain Expressway"). It is one of the most densely populated residential neighborhoods in the city and home to the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and its adjacent hospitals, the state’s second largest employer.[1]

Southside is a hub for the city's progressive/bohemian communities, and five points south has long been one of the city’s most vibrant nightlife and entertainment districts. Southside is also the most racially diverse neighborhood in Birmingham and is considered a gay-friendly community, playing host to the city’s annual gay pride parade each June.[2] With its college town atmosphere, the community has a high percentage of bicycle commuters, and according to walkscore.com, has two of the top three most walkable zip code neighborhoods in the metropolitan area. Southside has several local businesses, and many residents are employed in the medical, research, and banking industries that anchor Birmingham’s economy, or at one of the numerous law firms located in five points south. George Ward Park, Vulcan Trail, and the new Railroad Park afford residents with plentiful opportunities for outdoors recreation and scenic views. The Vulcan statue, Birmingham’s city symbol, crowns the crest of Red Mountain and is visible from most areas of the neighborhood. Other attractions include Good People Brewery, Dreamland Bar-B-Que, The Storyteller fountain,[3] the Alys Stephens Center[4] and the new Regions Field baseball stadium.

History[edit]

Southside was developed as one of the first streetcar suburbs for Birmingham’s middle and upper class residents similar to Atlanta's Inman Park neighborhood, though the area now includes a mix of single and multi-family housing for all incomes. The proximity of UAB stabilized the community during nationwide urban decline in the late 20th century. Recently, the neighborhood has benefited from a revival in demand for affordable, centrally located residential options. The neighborhood contains seven historic districts with an eclectic mix of houses built between 1890 and 1920, primarily representing the Prairie, Craftsman, Neoclassical, and Victorian styles, with a few examples of Queen Anne and Colonial Revival mixed in. The network of sidewalks, tree-lined streets and rear-access alleys recently served as a conceptual model for the new urbanism community of Mt. Laurel located thirty minutes south by car.[5] Birmingham's citizen participation program organizes the Southside community into three neighborhood associations (Five Points South, Glen Iris, and Southside) which meet monthly.[6] Most residences are within city council district 3, currently served by Councilor Valerie Abbott.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Top-of-the-list alabamas largest employers". 
  2. ^ "Central AL Pride". 
  3. ^ "Frank Fleming Storyteller Fountain". 
  4. ^ "Alys Stephens Center". 
  5. ^ "Mt. Laurel Information". 
  6. ^ "Southside Neighborhood Info". 

External links[edit]