South African general election, 2014

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South African general election, 2014
South Africa
2009 ←
7 May 2014
→ 2019

All 400 seats to the National Assembly of South Africa
 Jacob G. Zuma - World Economic Forum Annual Meeting Davos 2010.jpgHelen Zille in 2010 (cropped).jpgMosiuoa Lekota, 000215-D-9880W-112 detail.jpg
LeaderJacob ZumaHelen ZilleMosiuoa Lekota
PartyAfrican National CongressDemocratic AllianceCongress of the People
Last election65.90%16.66%7.66%
Current seats2646730

 Mangosuthu Buthelezi (1983).jpgJulius Malema 2011-09-14 cropped.jpg
LeaderMangosuthu ButheleziJulius Malema
PartyInkatha Freedom PartyEconomic Freedom Fighters
Last election4.55%-
Current seats18-

South Africa electoral wards 2011 blank.svg

Electoral wards of South Africa for the 2014 election

Incumbent President

Jacob Zuma
African National Congress

 
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South African general election, 2014
South Africa
2009 ←
7 May 2014
→ 2019

All 400 seats to the National Assembly of South Africa
 Jacob G. Zuma - World Economic Forum Annual Meeting Davos 2010.jpgHelen Zille in 2010 (cropped).jpgMosiuoa Lekota, 000215-D-9880W-112 detail.jpg
LeaderJacob ZumaHelen ZilleMosiuoa Lekota
PartyAfrican National CongressDemocratic AllianceCongress of the People
Last election65.90%16.66%7.66%
Current seats2646730

 Mangosuthu Buthelezi (1983).jpgJulius Malema 2011-09-14 cropped.jpg
LeaderMangosuthu ButheleziJulius Malema
PartyInkatha Freedom PartyEconomic Freedom Fighters
Last election4.55%-
Current seats18-

South Africa electoral wards 2011 blank.svg

Electoral wards of South Africa for the 2014 election

Incumbent President

Jacob Zuma
African National Congress

This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
South Africa
Government
IEC poster advertising the final voter registration weekend

The 2014 South African general election will be held on 7 May 2014,[1][2] to elect a new National Assembly as well as new provincial legislatures in each province. It will be the fifth quinquennial election held under conditions of universal adult suffrage since the end of the apartheid era in 1994.

The National Assembly consists of 400 members elected by proportional representation with a closed list approach. Two hundred members will be elected from national party lists; the other 200 will be elected from provincial party lists in each of the nine provinces. The President of South Africa will be chosen by the National Assembly after the election. The premiers of each province will be chosen by the winning majority in each provincial legislature.

The National Council of Provinces (NCOP) consists of 90 members, ten elected by each provincial legislature. The NCOP members will be elected by the provincial legislatures in proportion to the party makeup of the legislatures.

Political parties[edit]

The governing African National Congress (ANC), supported by its Tripartite Alliance with the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU) and the South African Communist Party (SACP), have held a majority of the seats in the National Assembly since 1994. They were re-elected with increasing majorities in 1999 and 2004, and with a slight fall in its majority from 69% to 65.9% in 2009. The ANC is currently led by Jacob Zuma, who in 2012 was re-elected to a second five-year term as President of the African National Congress, beating his only rival and deputy, Kgalema Motlanthe, by a wide margin. Cyril Ramaphosa was elected as Deputy President of the ANC, succeeding Motlanthe who had declined a second term after losing to Zuma.

The official opposition Democratic Alliance (DA) received 16.7% of the vote in 2009, up from 12.4% in 2004. The DA is led by Helen Zille, who was re-elected unopposed as Leader of the Democratic Alliance at the party's Federal Congress in Gauteng, while Lindiwe Mazibuko continues as Leader of the Opposition in Parliament. At provincial level, the DA has been in power in the Western Cape province since 2009, and came to power in several Western Cape municipalities in the 2011 municipal elections.

The third largest party, Congress of the People (COPE), is led by Mosiuoa Lekota, although the leadership is disputed by Mbhazima Shilowa who continues to battle for recognition in the High Court. The party has been riven by infighting, causing it to lose much of its support and resulting in the formation of a splinter group, the United Congress.

Mangosuthu Buthelezi remains leader of the Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP) despite a challenge by former IFP chairperson Zanele kaMagwaza-Msibi, who went on to form the National Freedom Party (NFP) after her feud with Buthelezi. The NFP and IFP split the vote in the Zulu-dominated KwaZulu-Natal Province in the previous local government elections, both getting an even share of the vote, while the ANC continued to dominate the former IFP stronghold.

New parties[edit]

Several new parties will contest the election nationally and provincially:

Alliances[edit]

The Independent Democrats party, which won 4 seats and 0.9% of the national vote in 2009, is set to merge with the Democratic Alliance before the 2014 general election.

On 17 December 2013, the South African Press Association reported that five opposition parties, namely COPE, the IFP, the African Christian Democratic Party, the United Christian Democratic Party and the Freedom Front Plus, had formed a coalition with 20 specific priorities. The parties in the coalition, named the Collective for Democracy (CD) and chaired by COPE leader Mosiuoa Lekota, will retain their own identity and contest the election individually.[3] The IFP denied being part of the coalition, saying they are wary of forming such alliances given the confusion it had caused for their supporters in previous elections.[4][5]

On 20 December 2013, COSATU's largest affiliate NUMSA announced that they will not endorse the ANC or any other political party in 2014. NUMSA plans to establish a new working class collective along the lines of the defunct United Democratic Front, with the ultimate goal of forming a socialist party that will contest the 2019 general election.[6][7]

On 28 January 2014, the DA announced that Mamphela Ramphele had accepted an invitation to stand as its presidential candidate in the 2014 general election,[8][9][10] and the DA and Agang South Africa were set to merge.[11][12] On 31 January 2014, Ramphele stated that she would not take up DA party membership and would remain the leader of Agang South Africa, resulting in confusion.[13] On 2 February 2014, Helen Zille stated that Ramphele had reneged on her agreement to stand as the DA's presidential candidate.[14] Ramphele subsequently apologised for the reversal of her decision, saying that the timing was not right as the reaction to it had shown people were unable to overcome race-based party politics.[15]

On 6 February 2014, it was reported that COPE members who support Mbhazima Shilowa plan to join the United Democratic Movement led by Bantu Holomisa which won 4 seats in the 2009 election.[16]

Voter registration[edit]

On the weekends of 9–10 November 2013 and 8–9 February 2014 all voting stations were opened for new voters to register and for those who moved residence to re-register in their new voting district. Approximately 5.5 million people in total visited voting stations, including approximately 2.3 million new voters. This increased the number of registered voters to 25.3 million, representing 80.5% of the 31.4 million people eligible to vote in the country.[17][18][19] South Africans who were born after the 1994 general election, known as the born-free generation, and are aged 18 or older will be eligible to vote for the first time.[20]

On 26 November 2013 the Electoral Amendment Act, 2013, came into force. It allows South African citizens resident outside South Africa to register and vote in the election of the National Assembly.[21]

Seats in the National Assembly[edit]

PartyLeaderPrevious election results
African National Congress
Jacob Zuma
264 seats (65.9%)
Democratic Alliance
Helen Zille
67 seats (16.7%)
Congress of the People
Mosiuoa Lekota
30 seats (7.4%)
Inkatha Freedom Party
Mangosuthu Buthelezi
18 seats (4.6%)
Independent Democrats
Patricia de Lille
4 seats (0.9%)
United Democratic Movement
Bantu Holomisa
4 seats (0.9%)
Freedom Front Plus
Pieter Mulder
4 seats (0.8%)
African Christian Democratic Party
Kenneth Meshoe
3 seats (0.8%)
United Christian Democratic Party
Isaac Sipho Mfundisi
2 seats (0.4%)
Pan Africanist Congress of Azania
Alton Mphethi
1 seat (0.3%)
Minority Front
Shameen Thakur-Rajbansi
1 seat (0.3%)
Azanian People's Organisation
Jacob Dikobo
1 seat (0.2%)
African People's Convention
Themba Godi
1 seat (0.2%)
Agang South Africa
Mamphela Ramphele
New party
Economic Freedom Fighters
Julius Malema
New party
National Freedom Party
Zanele kaMagwaza-Msibi
New party
Patriotic Alliance
Kenny Kunene
New party
United Congress
Mluleki George
New party
Workers and Socialist Party
Mametlwe Sebei
New party
National Assembly total
400 seats

Opinion polling[edit]

DatePolling organisationANCDAEFFACDPAgangCOPEIFPOthersAbstention/Don't know/No answer
November 2013[22][23][24][25][26]Ipsos53%18%4%1%1%1%1%2%19%

According to the results of an Ipsos survey published in February 2014, the DA is the most multi-racial party while the ANC has 96% black supporters and the EFF has 99% black supporters, relative to 76% black survey respondents. The age profile of ANC supporters closely resembles the age profile of voters, while DA supporters are slightly older overall and EFF supporters are significantly younger overall.[27]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Statement by His Excellency President Jacob Zuma announcing the date for the fifth general elections in South Africa". GCIS. 7 February 2014. Retrieved 7 February 2014. 
  2. ^ "Zuma signs election proclamation". News24. 21 February 2014. Retrieved 21 February 2014. 
  3. ^ SAPA (17 December 2013). "Opposition parties form coalition in bid to oust ANC". Mail & Guardian. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  4. ^ Makinana, Andisiwe (18 December 2013). "IFP denies involvement with new opposition coalition". Mail & Guardian. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  5. ^ Mkhize, Nce (19 December 2013). "IFP 'shocked' to hear it is part of Collection for Democracy". Business Day. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  6. ^ Letsoalo, Mmanaledi; Mataboge; Reuters (20 December 2013). "Gatvol Numsa cuts ties with ANC". Mail & Guardian. Retrieved 20 December 2013. 
  7. ^ Polgreen, Lydia (20 December 2013). "South Africa's Biggest Trade Union Pulls Its Support for A.N.C.". The New York Times. Retrieved 21 December 2013. 
  8. ^ "Ramphele is joining us – DA source". IOL. 28 January 2014. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  9. ^ "Ramphele: This is an astonishing moment for SA". News24. 28 January 2014. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  10. ^ "Ramphele announced as DA presidential candidate". Mail & Guardian. 28 January 2014. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  11. ^ Davis, Rebecca (28 January 2014). "DA-Agang: Dial M for Merger". IOL. Retrieved 29 January 2014. "Zille said that the two parties were establishing a 'joint technical committee to manage the integration of the DA and Agang SA structures and volunteers'." 
  12. ^ Ensor, Linda (28 January 2014). "Mamphela Ramphele joins DA as presidential candidate". Business Day. Retrieved 29 January 2014. "Dr Ramphele said she believed the merger was a historic moment" 
  13. ^ Ramphele, Mamphela (31 January 2014). "I won't be accepting DA membership on Monday". Politicsweb. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  14. ^ Zille, Helen (2 February 2014). "Mamphela Ramphele has reneged on our agreement". Politicsweb. Retrieved 2 February 2014. 
  15. ^ "Ramphele says she made the right decision with DA candidacy". Times LIVE. 3 February 2014. Retrieved 3 February 2014. 
  16. ^ Zuzile, Mphumzi (6 February 2014). "Shilowa’s COPE faction set to join UDM". Daily Dispatch. Retrieved 7 February 2014. 
  17. ^ Marrian, Natasha (12 November 2013). "About 1-million new voters register ahead of 2014 polls, says IEC". BusinessDay. Retrieved 9 December 2013. 
  18. ^ "Millions of youths registered". News24. 11 February 2014. Retrieved 11 February 2014. 
  19. ^ Bapela, Kate (11 February 2014). "25.3m South Africans registered to vote – IEC" (Press release). Politicsweb. Retrieved 12 February 2014. 
  20. ^ "ANC risks losing 'born free' voters". News24. 28 January 2013. Retrieved 24 May 2013. 
  21. ^ "Electoral Amendment Act in Force". Sabinet Law. 27 November 2013. Retrieved 9 December 2013. 
  22. ^ "Support for political parties". Ipsos South Africa. Retrieved 16 January 2014. 
  23. ^ Ndlangisa, Sabelo; du Plessis, Carien; sama Yende, Sizwe; Pauw, Jacques (12 January 2014). "Elections 2014: Will it be ANC vs EFF?". City Press. Retrieved 16 January 2014. 
  24. ^ Harris, Mari (15 January 2014). "ANC's support down to 53% among eligible voters – Ipsos". Politicsweb (Press release). Retrieved 16 January 2014. 
  25. ^ Harris, Mari (15 January 2014). "ANC polling at 45% in Gauteng – Ipsos". Politicsweb (Press release). Retrieved 16 January 2014. 
  26. ^ Cohen, Mike (16 January 2014). "ANC Support Below 60% May Trigger 'Populist' Push, Citi Says". Bloomberg Business Week. Retrieved 16 January 2014. 
  27. ^ Harris, Mari (5 February 2014). "The supporter profiles of SA's three largest parties – Ipsos". Politicsweb (Press release). Retrieved 7 February 2014. 

External links[edit]