Snoopy

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Snoopy
Peanuts character
First appearanceOctober 4, 1950 (comic strip)
Last appearanceFebruary 13, 2000 (comic strip)
Voiced byBill Melendez (1963–2008; vocal effects only)
Robert Towers (1985)
Cameron Clarke (1988-1989)
Daniel Davies (2008-2009)
Andy Beall (2011-present)
Information
FamilyFather: Baxter
Mother: Missy
Brothers: Spike, Andy, Olaf, Marbles, Ruffles
Sisters: Belle, Molly
Owner: Charlie Brown
Lillian "Lila" Emmons Allcroft (previously)
Clara ("the annoying girl")
Peppermint Patty
Poochie (possibly before Lila)
 
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Not to be confused with Snuppy.
Snoopy
Peanuts character
First appearanceOctober 4, 1950 (comic strip)
Last appearanceFebruary 13, 2000 (comic strip)
Voiced byBill Melendez (1963–2008; vocal effects only)
Robert Towers (1985)
Cameron Clarke (1988-1989)
Daniel Davies (2008-2009)
Andy Beall (2011-present)
Information
FamilyFather: Baxter
Mother: Missy
Brothers: Spike, Andy, Olaf, Marbles, Ruffles
Sisters: Belle, Molly
Owner: Charlie Brown
Lillian "Lila" Emmons Allcroft (previously)
Clara ("the annoying girl")
Peppermint Patty
Poochie (possibly before Lila)

Snoopy is a cartoon dog in the long-running comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz. He is Charlie Brown's pet dog. The original drawings of Snoopy were inspired by Spike, one of Schulz's childhood dogs.[1][2]

Traits[edit]

Snoopy imagines himself as a World War One flying Ace, whilst imagining his doghouse as a Sopwith Camel.

Snoopy cannot talk, but his thoughts are shown in thought balloons. In the animated Peanuts films and television specials, Snoopy's thoughts are not verbalized; his moods are instead conveyed through growls, sobs, laughter, and monosyllabic utterances such as "bleah," "hey," etc. as well as through pantomime.

Schulz summed up Snoopy's character in a 1997 interview: "He has to retreat into his fanciful world in order to survive. Otherwise, he leads kind of a dull, miserable life. I don't envy dogs the lives they have to live."[3]

Snoopy has imagined himself as various different animals, such as a pelican or a vulture, as well as having various professions, such as being an author, a professional skater, or a World War One flying ace. Snoopy's fantasy roles are essentially the same, with Snoopy performing the respective role for each one, and almost always failing at what he does (his extremely short "novels" are never published, he is consistently shot down by the Red Baron, and he can never be a convincing vulture, bear, or penguin, even to himself).

Doghouse[edit]

Snoopy' doghouse defies physics, bigger on the inside than the outside. Snoopy's doghouse was also revealed to have a basement for brewing in It's Magic Charlie Brown.

History[edit]

Snoopy's original appearance from October 4, 1950.

Snoopy appeared on the October 4 1950 strip, two years after the first strip. On March 16, 1952,[4] his thoughts were first shown in a thought balloon. On June 28, 1957, Snoopy walked on his two hind legs like a human for the first time.

Snoopy's doghouse, originally depicted in a standard 3/4 view, was soon almost entirely depicted from the side. This allowed Snoopy to use the top of the doghouse to pursue his pretend "careers" - he typed his novels, chased the Red Baron, and talked with the neighborhood birds atop the doghouse.

Snoopy's popularity peaked in the late 1960s, arguably eclipsing the popularity of Charlie Brown. He became friends with the various birds depicted in the strip, particularly Woodstock.

He was depicted prominently in the last strip that Charles Schulz ever wrote, on February 13, 2000.

Relationship with other Peanuts characters[edit]

Interactions with Charlie Brown[edit]

Despite his history of conflicted loyalties and his occasionally disdainful attitude toward Charlie Brown (he can never remember Charlie Brown's name and thinks of him as "that round-headed kid"), Snoopy has shown himself steadfastly loyal to his current owner. He joined Charlie Brown in walking out of a game of Ha-Ha Herman when Peppermint Patty crudely insulted Charlie Brown (though she was unaware that Charlie Brown was within earshot). He also helped Charlie Brown recover his autographed baseball when a bully had taken it and was challenging Charlie Brown to fight him for it. When Charlie Brown has to stop dedicating himself to making Snoopy happy, Snoopy replies, "Don't worry about it. I was already happy."

Siblings[edit]

Snoopy is usually depicted as having seven siblings, five of whom appear at some point in the strip: Andy, Belle, Marbles, Olaf, and Spike. Most often seen is Spike, who lives in the desert (near the real-life locale of Needles, California). Sharing Snoopy's penchant for a fantasy life, he is friends with saguaro cacti. Spike is very thin, wears a fedora and has long whiskers. (Spike was the name of one of Schulz's childhood pet dogs.)

In aviation and space[edit]

Statue at Kennedy Space Center. Now located in the Apollo/Saturn V building.

Namesakes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schulz, Charles M. (1994). Around the world in 50 years: Charlie Brown's anniversary celebration. Andrews McMeel Publishing. p. 11. ISBN 978-0-8362-1766-7. 
  2. ^ Snoopy, Charlie Brown et les autres. L'album de famille de Schulz. ISBN 978-2-7324-2681-5. 
  3. ^ Groth, Gary (December 1997). "Charles Schulz at 3 o'clock in the morning". The Comics Journal: 27 (flip). 
  4. ^ [source:http://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/1952/03/16 "March 16, 1952"]. 
  5. ^ "Picture of Charlie Brown and Snoopy on Apollo 10". Retrieved 2006-10-01. 
  6. ^ "Space Flight Awareness Awards: SFA Silver Snoopy". Space Flight Awareness, NASA website. National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Retrieved 2007-06-21. 
  7. ^ B-52s in the Desert
  8. ^ Airship Operations information for MetLife blimp
  9. ^ Frommer's Arizona and the Grand Canyon 2012 by Karl Samson, John Wiley & Sons, 2011, page 249, "...between uptown Sedona and the "Y". Although there's a bit of traffic noise here, the view of Snoopy Rock is hard to beat."
  10. ^ Black Wind by Clive Cussler, Penguin, 2006 edition, page 259, "Like its beagle namesake, Snoopy sniffed along..."
  11. ^ "Chapter 1: Into Snoopy's Nose", Prodigals: A Vietnam Story by Richard Taylor, Casemate Publishers, 2003, page 11, "He spat out the words, "Snoopy's Nose!" The reference was to a bend in a tributary that made a 280-degree loop resembling the comic-strip character Snoopy's nose. Everyone, Vietnamese and Americans, knew this hostile place by its lovable namesake."

External links[edit]