Small Airplane Revitalization Act of 2013

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Small Airplane Revitalization Act of 2013
Great Seal of the United States.
Full titleTo ensure that the Federal Aviation Administration advances the safety of small airplanes, and the continued development of the general aviation industry, and for other purposes.
Introduced in113th United States Congress
Introduced onMay 7, 2013
Sponsored byRep. Mike Pompeo (R, KS-4)
Number of Co-Sponsors4
Effects and Codifications
U.S.C. section(s) affected15 U.S.C. § 3701(note),
Agencies affectedUnited States Congress, Federal Aviation Administration,
[H.R. 1848 Legislative history]
 
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Small Airplane Revitalization Act of 2013
Great Seal of the United States.
Full titleTo ensure that the Federal Aviation Administration advances the safety of small airplanes, and the continued development of the general aviation industry, and for other purposes.
Introduced in113th United States Congress
Introduced onMay 7, 2013
Sponsored byRep. Mike Pompeo (R, KS-4)
Number of Co-Sponsors4
Effects and Codifications
U.S.C. section(s) affected15 U.S.C. § 3701(note),
Agencies affectedUnited States Congress, Federal Aviation Administration,
[H.R. 1848 Legislative history]

The Small Airplane Revitalization Act of 2013 (H.R. 1848) is a bill related to airplane regulations in the United States of America that was introduced into the United States House of Representatives during the 113th United States Congress. The bill would require the Federal Aviation Authority to adopt the recommendations of the "Part 23 Reorganization Aviation Rulemaking Committee" about ways to modernize regulations on small aircraft.

According to a fact sheet provided by the United States House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, the general aviation industry "includes nearly 600,000 pilots, employs roughly 1.3 milllion people, and contributes approximately $150 billion annually to the U.S. economy."[1] The industry has been undergoing some recent decline, some of which is blamed on outdated and inappropriate regulations that stifle innovation and unnecessarily increase costs.[1] The Federal Aviation Administration began to deal with this situation in August 2011 by chartering the "Part 23 Reorganization Aviation Rulemaking Committee."[1] The Committee was "charged with creating a progressive, tier-based system so that small recreational airplanes won’t have to be designed and certificated under the same regulatory requirements as heavier, more complex and higher performance aircraft."[2] The Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) are divided into different Parts, with Part 23 comprising the section of rules related to small planes. In June 2013, this Committee finished writing its recommendation for changes to make to FAR Part 23 "to remove barriers to bringing new, safer airplane designs to market."[1] The Committee's recommendations included "(1) removing prescriptive methods of compliance, (2) ensuring safety objectives address future technologies, (3) utilizing FAA-accepted consensus standards, (4) developing globally acceptable regulations, and (5) implementing these recommendations as soon as possible."[1] There is also the possibility that these new regulations will be adopted by other countries, helping to set international standards.[3]

Provisions/Elements of the bill[edit]

This summary is based largely on the summary provided by the Congressional Research Service, a public domain source.[4]

The Small Airplane Revitalization Act of 2013 would direct the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to advance the safety and continued development of small airplanes by reorganizing the certification requirements to streamline the approval of safety advancements.[4]

The bill would require the Administrator to issue a final rule meeting certain consensus-based standards and FAA Part 23 Reorganization Aviation Rulemaking Committee objectives, including to: (1) create a regulatory regime for small airplane safety; (2) set broad, outcome-driven objectives that will spur small plane innovation and technology adoption; (3) replace current, prescriptive requirements contained in FAA rules with performance-based regulations; and (4) use FAA-accepted consensus standards to clarify how Part 23 safety objectives may be met by specific small plane safety designs and technologies.[4]

The final rule required by this bill would be due by December 31, 2015.[1]

Procedural history[edit]

The Small Airplane Revitalization Act of 2013 was introduced into the House on May 7, 2013 by Rep. Mike Pompeo (R-KS).[5] It was referred to the United States House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the United States House Transportation Subcommittee on Aviation.[5] On July 10, 2013, the bill was reported (amended) by a voice vote of the Committee. The House Majority Leader Eric Cantor place the bill on the schedule for the week of July 15, 2013,[6] and it passed unanimously (411-0) on July 18, 2013.[7]

Debate and discussion[edit]

Arguing in favor of the bill when he introduced it, Rep. Pompeo said, "The existing outdated certification process needlessly increases the cost of safety and technology upgrades by up to 10 times. With this bill, we can ensure that the general aviation industry has what it needs to thrive."[3][8]

The bill was supported by a number of aviation industry groups and companies. The senior vice president of engineering at Cessna, and American aircraft company, spoke in favor of the bill, as well as saying that “the active and willing participation of the FAA and other international regulatory bodies has been critical to the success of this effort so far.”[8] Pete Bunce, the current president and CEO of General Aviation Manufacturers Association (GAMA), an aviation industry trade association, also spoke in favor of the bill.[8] The bill also received the support of the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA).[9]

The Small Aircraft Revitalization Act of 2013's companion bill in the Senate, S. 1072, (which is considered nearly identical) was criticized for at least two reasons. First, critics argued that the bill was unlikely to make a difference because "the FAA, like any government bureaucracy, will not give up power without a big fight that could last for years or even decades."[10] Second, critics argued that the bill was too limited in scope; it dealt only with Part 23 covering regulations on new constructions, but does not do anything to fix regulations in Part 21 covering the modification of used planes (to update them with new safety equipment, autopilot, etc).[10]

See also[edit]

Notes/References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Fact Sheet: H.R. 1848 – Small Airplane Revitalization Act of 2013". Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. Retrieved 15 July 2013. 
  2. ^ "FAA Forms ARC to Reorganize Part 23". EAA.org News. 25 August 2011. Retrieved 15 July 2013. 
  3. ^ a b Bellamy III, Woodrow (May 8, 2013). "Part 23 Rewrite Effort Gains Traction With New Bill". Aviation Today. Retrieved 15 July 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c "H.R. 1848 - Summary". United States Congress. Retrieved 15 July 2013. 
  5. ^ a b "H.R. 1848 - All Congressional Actions". Library of Congress. Retrieved 15 July 2013. 
  6. ^ "Leader's Weekly Schedule - Week of July 15, 2013". House Majority Leader's Office. Retrieved 15 July 2013. 
  7. ^ "Small Airplane Revitalization Act Passes House, Heads to Senate". Experimental Aircraft Association. 2013-07-18. 
  8. ^ a b c "Rep. Mike Pompeo Introduces Small Aircraft Revitalization Act of 2013". Congressman Pompeo's House Page. Retrieved 15 July 2013. 
  9. ^ "Small Airplane Revitalization Act Clears First Hurdle". EAA.org News. 11 July 2013. Retrieved 15 July 2013. 
  10. ^ a b Thurber, Matt (30 May 2013). "AIN Blog: Let's Kick The FAA Into Action On New Regulations". AINonline. Retrieved 15 July 2013. 

External links[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Government.