Sloan Fellows

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

 
Jump to: navigation, search

The Sloan Fellows program is a mid-career master's degree in general management and leadership initially supported by a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation taking place at one of three universities: the MIT Sloan School of Management, the Stanford Graduate School of Business, and the London Business School (LBS). It targets experienced managers who have demonstrated success either within organizations or independently as entrepreneurs.

History[edit]

The Sloan Fellows Program was created at the MIT Sloan School of Management in 1940, by Alfred P. Sloan, Chairman of General Motors from 1937 to 1956, who envisioned the Sloan Fellowship as a means of developing the "ideal manager".

In the following decades, the program was expanded to include the Sloan Master's at Stanford Graduate School of Business[1] (1957[2]) and the Sloan Master's at London Business School[3] (1968 [4]). In 2013 Stanford changed the name of its Sloan Fellows Program to Stanford MSx (Master of Science in Management for Experienced Leaders), though participants in the program remain Stanford Sloan Fellows.[5]

Academics[edit]

Sloan Fellows comprise a mix of company- and self-sponsored candidates. On all three schools, a significant degree of experience is required for admission. This is in keeping with Alfred P. Sloan's conviction that experienced managers would benefit best from the program. Alumni describe the program as "transformational", in keeping with the original vision of preparing successful managers for senior business leadership positions.

Unlike most Executive MBA programs which are part-time over a year and a half to three years, the Sloan Fellows program runs full-time over the course of 12-14 months, depending on electives. London Business School and MIT Sloan offer an optional research project/thesis.[6][7][8]

The program recognizes the importance of developing leadership as well as management competency in Sloan Fellows. As such, in addition to the standard MBA curriculum of management courses, the Sloan program contains a strong personal-development component designed to develop the leadership and strategic thinking capabilities of Sloan Fellows.

Traditional full-time MBA programs comparison[edit]

The Sloan Fellows program is a mix of top Executive MBA programs (experienced professionals) and top full-time MBA programs (full-time, academic rigor). The table below shows the main differences between the Sloan Fellows program and the traditional top MBA programs.

Typical top 10 MBA programSloan Fellows program
DurationFull-time, 2-yearFull-time, 1-year
Average work experience4-year13-year, 8-year minimum
Average age25 - 3030 - 45
Non-US students< 40%> 60%
Class sizebetween 400 and 1000between 50 and 110
DegreeMBAMSc in Management (except MIT, which offers MBA too)
GMAT influence on acceptanceHighMedium
Work experience influence on acceptanceMediumHigh

MIT, Stanford and LBS differences[edit]

Although the program in any of the three schools are very similar in nature, there are some key difference among them. The table below summarizes the differences:

MIT SloanStanford Graduate School of BusinessLondon Business School
Minimum experience10-year[9]8-year [10]12-year [11]
Average experience14-year [12]12-year [13]16-year [14]
Class size~110 [9]~83 [13]~52 [14]
Passports35 [15]31 [13]22 [14]
Tuition$125,500 [16]$ 112,100 [17]£49,098 [18]
DegreeMBA or MSc in Management [19]MS in Management (MSM) [20]MSc in Leadership and Strategy [21]
GMATNot always necessary [9]700 (median) [13]650 (average) [22]

Degrees[edit]

Sloan Fellows at MIT Sloan may opt for an MBA, an MS in management, or an MS in the management of technology (MOT), depending on their curricular and research choices. Sloan Fellows at London Business School and Stanford Graduate School of Business are both awarded a Master of Science degree.

Prominent alumni[edit]

Notable MIT Sloan Fellows alumni include:

Notable Stanford MSx (Sloan Fellows) alumni include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stanford Graduate School of Business. "Stanford Sloan Master's Program". Stanford University. Retrieved 9 August 2012. 
  2. ^ Stanford GSB. "The Sloan Program at 50". Stanford GSB. Retrieved 2 January 2013. 
  3. ^ London Business School. "Sloan Masters in Leadership and Strategy". London Business School. Retrieved 9 August 2012. 
  4. ^ London Business School. "Sloan 40th anniversary". London Business School. Retrieved 2 January 2013. 
  5. ^ Stanford renames Sloan Master's Program - http://www.gsb.stanford.edu/news/headlines/redesigned-sloan-masters-curriculum-named-stanford-msx-program-experienced-leaders
  6. ^ [1][dead link]
  7. ^ International Study Trip
  8. ^ [2][dead link]
  9. ^ a b c "MIT Sloan Fellows Admissions Criteria". Retrieved 2 January 2013. 
  10. ^ "Stanford Sloan Eligibility". Retrieved 2 January 2013. 
  11. ^ "Who is the Sloan programme designed for?". Retrieved 2 January 2013. 
  12. ^ "MIT Sloan Fellows - Program brochure". Retrieved 2 January 2013. 
  13. ^ a b c d "Stanford Sloan Class of 2013 Profile". Retrieved 2 January 2013. 
  14. ^ a b c "LBS Sloan Masters - Class of 2012 Profile". Retrieved 2 January 2013. 
  15. ^ "MIT Sloan Fellows - Class of 2013". Retrieved 2 January 2013. 
  16. ^ "MIT Sloan Fellows - Program Expenses". Retrieved 2 January 2013. 
  17. ^ "Stanford Sloan Cost of Attendance for the 2012-2013". Retrieved 2 January 2013. 
  18. ^ "LBS Sloan Masters - Fees and financing". Retrieved 2 January 2013. 
  19. ^ "MIT Sloan Fellows - Degree and research options". Retrieved 2 January 2013. 
  20. ^ "Stanford Sloan". Retrieved 2 January 2013. 
  21. ^ "LBS Sloan Masters". Retrieved 2 January 2013. 
  22. ^ "LBS Sloan Masters - What is the minimum GMAT score required?". Retrieved 2 January 2013. 

Further reading[edit]