Simon Fanshawe

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Simon Hew Dalrymple Fanshawe OBE (born 26 December 1956, in Devizes, England) is a writer and broadcaster. He contributes frequently to British newspapers, TV and radio. He is also now a consultant and non-executive director of public and private organisations.

Education[edit]

Fanshawe was educated at two boarding independent schools: at Chafyn Grove School in the cathedral city of Salisbury in Wiltshire, and Marlborough College in the market town of Marlborough in Wiltshire, followed by the University of Sussex in the Weald in East Sussex, very near the village of Falmer and a few miles from the city of Brighton, where he studied Law.[1]

Career[edit]

Fanshawe first came to public attention as a comedian, winning the prestigious Perrier Award in 1989,[2] and on the television programme That's Life!.

Since then, Fanshawe has been a very frequent contributor on a variety of subjects from arts to politics in newspapers and on many BBC radio and TV programmes. His BBC Radio 4 profile light-heartedly describes him as a "media tart".[3]

Fanshawe has also been involved in many community/campaigning groups and public bodies – often as a board member. He led the campaign to make Brighton and Hove a city in 2000. He was a founding member of Stonewall. He was the chairman of the board for the Brighton Festival Fringe and is on the Board of the Edinburgh Fringe. He founded and chaired the Economic Strategy body of his home town, The Brighton & Hove Economic Partnership.[4] He was Chairman of Brighton & Hove Local Radio Ltd from 1996 to 2000 when the company was acquired by Forever Broadcasting.

Fanshawe studied Law at the University of Sussex in Brighton, England, and is now Chair of the University's governing Council, for which he was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in the 2013 New Year Honours for services to higher education.[5]

Fanshawe now lives in the Kemptown area of Brighton.[6][7]

In 2006, Fanshawe made the documentary "The Trouble with Gay Men", shown on BBC Three.[8][9]

In 2007, Fanshawe presented the first programme in the BBC's Building Britain series, concentrating his attentions the key role of developers in making cities over the last two centuries.

Newspapers and magazines[edit]

Fanshawe has contributed articles to the following publications:

Radio[edit]

Fanshawe has been a presenter or contributor on the following radio programs:

Television[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Passed/Failed: An education in the life of Simon Fanshawe, writer and broadcaster Publisher: The Independent. Published: 11 May 2006. Retrieved: 18 August 2013.
  2. ^ Hall, Julian (11 August 2009). "Fringe benefits: How winning the top comedy prize at Edinburgh can transform a performer's life". The Independent. 
  3. ^ "Simon Fanshawe". Simonfanshawe.com. Retrieved 14 January 2010. 
  4. ^ "Simon Fanshawe re-elected as Chair of BHEP Brighton & Hove Economic Partnership". Brightonbusiness.co.uk. Retrieved 15 January 2010. 
  5. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 60367. p. 10. 29 December 2012.
  6. ^ "Mr Simon Fanshawe : Governance". University of Sussex. Retrieved 15 January 2010. 
  7. ^ Sale, Jonathan (11 May 2006). "PassedFailed: An education in the life of Simon Fanshawe writer and broadcaster". The Independent. 
  8. ^ Fanshawe, Simon (21 April 2006). "Society now accepts gay men as equals. So why on earth do so many continue to behave like teenagers?". The Observer. 
  9. ^ "The trouble with a documentary on gay men". Pink News. 25 April 2006. Retrieved 15 January 2010. 
  10. ^ Delingpole, James; Fanshawe, Simon (2005), "BOOKS – The Done Thing", The Spectator (F.C. Westley): 50, ISSN 0038-6952, OCLC 99780022 
  11. ^ "Table manners off Britons' menus". BBC News. 15 November 2005. 

External links[edit]