Short division

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In arithmetic, short division is a division algorithm which breaks down a division problem into a series of easy steps. It is an abbreviated form of long division. Short division relies on mental arithmetic, which necessarily limits the size of the divisor. For most people, small integer divisors up to 12 are handled using memorised multiplication tables, though some people can use the procedure for larger divisors.

As in all division problems, a number called the dividend is divided by another, called the divisor. The answer to the problem is called the quotient.

Using short division, one can solve a division problem with a very large dividend by following a series of easy steps.[1]

Tableau[edit]

Short division does not use the slash (/) or obelus (÷) symbols. Instead, it displays the dividend, divisor, and quotient (when it is found) in a tableau. An example is shown below, representing the division of 500 by 4. The quotient is 125.

 \begin{matrix} \quad 125\\ 4\overline{)500}\\ \end{matrix}

Example[edit]

The procedure involves several steps. As an example, consider 950 divided by 4:

  1. The dividend and divisor are written in the short division tableau:
     \begin{matrix} 4 \overline{)950} \  \end{matrix}
    Dividing 950 by 4 in a single step would require knowing the multiplication table up to 238 × 4. Instead, the division is reduced to small steps. Starting from the left, enough digits are selected to form a number (called the partial dividend) between 1 and 10 × 4 (the divisor in this problem). Here, that number is 9.
  2. The first number to be divided by the divisor (4) is the partial dividend (9). We write the integer part of the result (2) above the division bar over the leftmost digit of the dividend, and we write the remainder (1) as a small digit above and to the right of the partial dividend (9).
     \begin{matrix} 2\\ 4\overline{)9^150} \end{matrix}
  3. Next we repeat step 2, using the small digit just written along with the next digit of the dividend to form a new partial dividend (15). Dividing the new partial dividend by the divisor (4), we write the result as before — the quotient above the next digit of the dividend, and the remainder as a small digit to the upper right. (Here 15 divided by 4 is 3, with a remainder of 3.)
     \begin{matrix} \,\,23\\ 4\overline{)9^15^30}\\ \end{matrix}
  4. We continue repeating step 2 until there are no digits remaining in the dividend. In this example, we see that 30 divided by 4 is 7 with a remainder of 2. The number written above the bar (237) is the quotient, and the last small digit (2) is the remainder.
     \begin{matrix} \quad 237\\ 4\overline{)9^15^30^2}\\ \end{matrix}
  5. The answer in this example is 237 with a remainder of 2. Alternatively, we can continue the above procedure if we want to produce a decimal answer. We do this by adding a decimal point and zeroes as necessary at the right of the dividend, and then treating each zero as another digit of the dividend. Thus, the next step in such a calculation would give the following:
     \begin{matrix} \quad 237.5\\ 4\overline{)9^15^30.^20}\\ \end{matrix}

Modulo division[edit]

When one is interested only in the remainder of the division, this procedure (a variation of short division) ignores the quotient and tallies only the remainders. It can be used for manual modulo calculation or as a test for even divisibility. The quotient digits are not written down.

For example, what is the remainder of 16762109 divided by 7?

 \begin{matrix} 7)16^27^66^32^41^60^49^0 \end{matrix}

The remainder is zero, so 16762109 is exactly divisible by 7.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ G.P Quackenbos, LL.D. (1874). "Chapter VII: Division". A Practical Arithmetic. D. Appleton & Company. 

External links[edit]