Seaside Heights, New Jersey

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Borough of Seaside Heights
—  Borough  —
Seaside Heights boardwalk looking toward Funtown Pier
Motto: Your home for family fun since 1913!
Location of Seaside Heights in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Seaside Heights, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°56′42″N 74°04′44″W / 39.944978°N 74.078783°W / 39.944978; -74.078783Coordinates: 39°56′42″N 74°04′44″W / 39.944978°N 74.078783°W / 39.944978; -74.078783
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyOcean
IncorporatedFebruary 26, 1913
Government[1]
 • TypeBorough
 • MayorWilliam Akers
 • AdministratorJohn Camera[2]
Area[3]
 • Total0.746 sq mi (1.933 km2)
 • Land0.619 sq mi (1.604 km2)
 • Water0.127 sq mi (0.329 km2)  17.02%
Elevation[4]7 ft (2 m)
Population (2010 Census)[5][6][7][8]
 • Total2,887
 • Density4,662.9/sq mi (1,800.4/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code08751[9]
Area code(s)732/848
FIPS code34-66450[10][11]
GNIS feature ID0885390[12][3]
Websitehttp://www.seaside-heightsnj.org/
 
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Borough of Seaside Heights
—  Borough  —
Seaside Heights boardwalk looking toward Funtown Pier
Motto: Your home for family fun since 1913!
Location of Seaside Heights in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Seaside Heights, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°56′42″N 74°04′44″W / 39.944978°N 74.078783°W / 39.944978; -74.078783Coordinates: 39°56′42″N 74°04′44″W / 39.944978°N 74.078783°W / 39.944978; -74.078783
CountryUnited States
StateNew Jersey
CountyOcean
IncorporatedFebruary 26, 1913
Government[1]
 • TypeBorough
 • MayorWilliam Akers
 • AdministratorJohn Camera[2]
Area[3]
 • Total0.746 sq mi (1.933 km2)
 • Land0.619 sq mi (1.604 km2)
 • Water0.127 sq mi (0.329 km2)  17.02%
Elevation[4]7 ft (2 m)
Population (2010 Census)[5][6][7][8]
 • Total2,887
 • Density4,662.9/sq mi (1,800.4/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code08751[9]
Area code(s)732/848
FIPS code34-66450[10][11]
GNIS feature ID0885390[12][3]
Websitehttp://www.seaside-heightsnj.org/

Seaside Heights is a Borough in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough population was 2,887.[6][8] Seaside Heights is situated on the Barnegat Peninsula, a long, narrow barrier peninsula that separates Barnegat Bay from the Atlantic Ocean. During the summer, the borough attracts a crowd largely under the age of 21, drawn to a community with boardwalk entertainment and one of the few shore communities with sizable numbers of apartments, attracting as many as 65,000 people who are often out until early morning visiting bars and restaurants.[13]

Seaside Heights was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 26, 1913, from portions of both Berkeley Township and Dover Township (now Toms River Township), based on the results of a referendum held on March 25, 1913.[14]

Seaside Heights is a resort community, with a beach, an amusement-oriented boardwalk, and numerous clubs and bars, making it a popular destination. Seaside Heights calls itself, "Your Home For Family Fun Since 1913!"[15] Peak months are July and August, but the season actually runs March–October. Summer population explodes to 30,000 to 65,000.[13][16] Route 37 in Toms River is routinely gridlocked on Friday afternoons in the summer months as vacationers travel to the barrier islands. The community is also known as the location of the hit MTV show Jersey Shore, with the director of the borough's business improvement district saying in 2010 that "we can't even calculate the economic benefit" to Seaside Heights from the continued presence of the show.[17]

Contents

Geography

Seaside Heights beach.

Seaside Heights is located at 39°56′42″N 74°04′44″W / 39.944978°N 74.078783°W / 39.944978; -74.078783 (39.944978,-74.078783). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.746 square miles (1.933 km2), of which, 0.619 square miles (1.604 km2) of it is land and 0.127 square miles (0.329 km2) of it (17.02%) is water.[18][3]

Demographics

Historical populations
CensusPop.
1920154
1930399159.1%
194054937.6%
195086257.0%
196095410.7%
19701,24830.8%
19801,80244.4%
19902,36631.3%
20003,15533.3%
20102,887−8.5%
Population sources:1920-1930[19]
1930-1990[20] 2000[21] 2010[6][7][8]

2010 Census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,887 people, 1,376 households, and 586.2 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,662.9 inhabitants per square mile (1,800.4 /km2). There were 3,003 housing units at an average density of 4,850.2 per square mile (1,872.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 80.74% (2,331) White, 6.69% (193) African American, 0.59% (17) Native American, 1.52% (44) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 6.96% (201) from other races, and 3.50% (101) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 17.87% (516) of the population.[6]

There were 1,376 households out of which 20.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 21.0% were married couples living together, 14.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 57.4% were non-families. 46.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.10 and the average family size was 3.03.[6]

In the borough the age distribution of the population shows 19.7% under the age of 18, 10.8% from 18 to 24, 32.5% from 25 to 44, 28.6% from 45 to 64, and 8.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.2 years. For every 100 females there were 112.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 113.2 males.[6]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $33,380 (with a margin of error of +/- $12,171) and the median family income was $39,688 (+/- $28,475). Males had a median income of $46,005 (+/- $18,386) versus $18,928 (+/- $13,004) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $19,865 (+/- $4,981). About 37.0% of families and 33.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 73.5% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.[22]

2000 Census

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 3,155 persons, 1,408 households, and 691 families residing in the borough. The population density was 5,162.2 people per square mile (1,997.0/km2). There were 2,840 housing units at an average density of 4,646.8 per square mile (1,797.6/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 89.95% White, 4.03% African American, 0.63% Native American, 0.86% Asian, 1.17% from other races, and 3.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.70% of the population.[21]

There were 1,408 households out of which 25.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 26.8% were married couples living together, 16.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 50.9% were non-families. 40.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.17 and the average family size was 2.93.[21]

In the borough the population was spread out with 23.3% under the age of 18, 10.9% from 18 to 24, 35.4% from 25 to 44, 19.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 106.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 102.8 males.[21]

The median income for a household in the borough was $25,963, and the median income for a family was $27,197. Males had a median income of $30,354 versus $21,899 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $18,665. About 21.9% of families and 24.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 37.9% of those under age 18 and 12.3% of those age 65 or over.[21]

Government

Seaside Heights is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[1]

As of 2012, the Mayor of Seaside Heights is William Akers (R, term ends December 31, 2015). Borough Council members are Victoria Graichen (R, 2012), Arline Ottoson (R, 2013), Agnes Polhemus (R, 2014), Harry Smith (R, 2012), Richard Tompkins (R, 2013) and Anthony Vaz (R, 2014).[23][24]

In the November 2011 general election, William Akers was elected to a four-year term as mayor and incumbent councilmembers Agnes Polhemus and Anthony E. Vaz were elected to three year terms on the borough council. The three Republicans will take their new seats in January 2012.[25]

Mayor Hershey had been in politics in Seaside Heights uninterrupted for over 35 years and had been first elected as Mayor in 1992. His predecessor George Tompkins (father of current councilman Rich Tompkins) served 16 years from 1975–1991, and Mayor J. Stanley Tunney served for 25 years from 1939-1964. Councilwoman Agnes Polhemus served from 1972–1993, and returned in 2006. Joann Duszczak served on the Borough Council for more than a decade before her death in December 2010.[26]

Seaside Heights Borough Attorney George R. Gilmore is grandson of the late Seaside Heights Mayor J. Stanley Tunney and is the Ocean County Republican Chairman.[27]

Federal, state and county representation

Seaside Heights is in the 3rd Congressional district and is part of New Jersey's 10th state legislative district.[7][28]

New Jersey's Third Congressional District is represented by Jon Runyan (R, Mount Laurel Township). New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Frank Lautenberg (D, Cliffside Park) and Bob Menendez (D, Hoboken).

The 10th district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James W. Holzapfel (R, Toms River) and in the General Assembly by Gregory P. McGuckin (R, Toms River) and David W. Wolfe (R, Brick Township).[29] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[30] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[31]

Ocean County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected at large in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. As of 2011, Ocean County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari (Toms River, term ends December 31, 2011), Freeholder Deputy Director Gerry P. Little (Surf City, 2012), John C. Bartlett, Jr. (Pine Beach, 2012), John P. Kelly (Eagleswood Township, 2010) and James F. Lacey (Brick Township, 2013).[32][33]

Politics

On the national and state levels, Seaside Heights leans strongly toward the Republican Party. In the 2008 Presidential Election, Republican John McCain received 53% of the vote, defeating Democrat Barack Obama, who received around 44%. In the 2009 Gubernatorial Election, Republican Chris Christie received 64% of the vote, defeating Democrat Jon Corzine, who received around 26%.

Education

The Seaside Heights School District is a public school district for students in Kindergarten through sixth grade. Hugh J. Boyd, Jr. Elementary School served 223 students as of the 2009-10 school year.[34] The original school, Seaside Heights Elementary School, was built in 1926 and later demolished after the opening of a larger school building on the bay front. The current school was built in the late 1960s, and is dedicated to Hugh J. Boyd, Jr., its longtime Superintendent of Schools who died in 1983.[35] Its Early Childhood Center addition was dedicated in 2007 in the name of longtime Board of Education Member Harry M. Smith III.[36] The Board of Education is made up of five members, each elected to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with one or two seats up for election each year.[37]

The Toms River Regional Schools provides administrative, maintenance, food and other services to the Seaside Heights Board of Education, and has done so since 2003.[38] Superintendent of Schools is Frank J. Roselli, who is also the Superintendent of the Toms River Regional School District, oversees the Seaside Heights district.

Public school students in grades 7 through 12 attend the schools of the Central Regional School District, which also serves students from the municipalities of Berkeley Township, Island Heights, Ocean Gate and Seaside Park.[39] The schools in the district (with 2009-10 enrollment from the National Center for Education Statistics[40]) are Central Regional Middle School (grades 7-8; 651 students) and Central Regional High School (9-12; 1,349).

Transportation

Route 35 and Route 37 both pass through Seaside Heights, intersecting at the approach to the Thomas A. Mathis and J. Stanley Tunney Bridges.

New Jersey Transit provides seasonal bus service in Seaside Heights on the 137 route to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan and to Newark on the 67 line.[41]

Points of interest

Casino Pier and Funtown Pier are amusement parks, each situated on a pier extending approximately 300 feet (100 m) into the Atlantic Ocean. Each of the two piers is part of a boardwalk that stretches for 2 miles (3.2 km), which offers many family-friendly attractions ranging from arcades, to games of chance, to beaches, to the wide variety of foods and desserts, all within walking distance.[42] Breakwater Beach (formerly known as Water Works) is a water park situated across the street from Casino Pier.

Seaside Heights hosted the AVP volleyball tournament for two years during the Summers of 2006 and 2007, with volleyball greats such as Karch Kiraly competing for the $200,000 purse.[43]

Popular culture

Seaside Heights is best known as the setting for MTV's reality TV series Jersey Shore. The first season of Jersey Shore was filmed in Seaside Heights and Toms River during August 2009. The show's third season was also filmed in Seaside Heights, during July, August, and September 2010.[44] After New York City officials nixed MTV's plans to hold a "Snooki Drop" alongside the Times Square Ball in Times Square New Year's Eve 2010–11, MTV moved the event (in which Jersey Shore cast member Nicole Polizzi is dropped in a ball) to Seaside Heights.[45] The show returned to Seaside Heights for its fifth season, which wrapped filming on August 2, 2011 and began airing in January 2012. Later that month it was announced that the studio was scouting for a new location to film the upcoming sixth season of the reality show. Las Vegas and Australia were possible locations as well as Jersey City and Atlantic City[46]

Prior to Jersey Shore, the town was also the setting of MTV's True Life: I Have A Summer Share, which was filmed in Seaside Heights, as was MTV's True Life: I'm a Jersey Shore Girl from 2004, which was one of the network's first stories of guidettes looking for the perfect guido.[42][47] Additionally, the MTV summer beach house was located in Seaside Heights for many summers in the early 2000s.[42][48]

In 1985, New Jersey rock band Bon Jovi filmed most of their music video for the song "In and Out of Love" in Seaside Heights, mainly on the boardwalk.[42][49]

Portions of the 2006 movie Artie Lange's Beer League were filmed in Seaside Heights.[50]

Bamboo Bar in Seaside Heights is open all year. It's located on 201 Boulevard. The phone number is 732-830-3660. There are 15 bars inside of Bamboo.

ABC soap opera One Life To Live filmed a portion of its 2008 storyline in Seaside Heights, mainly on the beach and boardwalk.[51]

References

  1. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 53.
  2. ^ Administrator, Borough of Seaside Heights. Accessed April 12, 2011.
  3. ^ a b c Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 17, 2012.
  4. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Seaside Heights, Geographic Names Information System, accessed May 10, 2007.
  5. ^ 2010 Census Populations: Ocean County, Asbury Park Press. Accessed July 13, 2011.
  6. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Seaside Heights borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  7. ^ a b c Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 6. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Seaside Heights borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  9. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Seaside Heights, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  10. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  11. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 14, 2008.
  12. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. http://geonames.usgs.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  13. ^ a b Mansnerus, Laura. "So, Just Who Goes Where When Going to the Shore?", The New York Times, June 6, 1999. Accessed July 13, 2011. "Seaside Heights, with a summer population of about 65,000, is packed, one of the few shore towns with larger apartment buildings. The boardwalk has almost a mile of skeeball and video arcades and enough fast food and bars to amuse the young into the early-morning hours. 'I don't think they let you into Seaside Heights if you're over 21,' said Kristin Farfalla, a sales representative at Midway Beach Real Estate in South Seaside Park."
  14. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 205. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  15. ^ Seaside Heights Beach Information, accessed April 5, 2007
  16. ^ ABOUT SEASIDE HEIGHTS, accessed May 10, 2007. "A community of 3,100 year-round residents, Seaside Heights expands to more than 30,000 in the summer."
  17. ^ Ditzian, Eric. "'Jersey Shore' Brings Seaside Heights A Fiscal Fist-Pump: 'We can't even calculate the economic benefit,' local business exec says.", MTV.com, April 12, 2010. Accessed July 13, 2011. "'Ever since it aired in the beginning of December, the phones have been ringing earlier and more often,' Maria Maruca, executive director of the Seaside Heights Business Improvement District, told MTV News. 'Now that the show is coming back, we can't even calculate the economic benefit.'
  18. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. http://www.census.gov/geo/www/gazetteer/gazette.html. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  19. ^ "Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I", United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  20. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  21. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Seaside Heights borough, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  22. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Seaside Heights borough, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  23. ^ Mayor & Council, Borough of Seaside Heights Borough. Accessed January 28, 2012. Note: Harry Smith was not listed as of date accessed.
  24. ^ 2012 Elected Officials of Ocean County, Ocean County, New Jersey. p. 10. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  25. ^ Staff. "2011 Ocean County election results", Asbury Park Press, November 8, 2011. Accessed November 28, 2011. "SEASIDE HEIGHTS: Mayor (1)4-year term √William Akers R 237 - Borough Council (2)3-year terms √Agnes Polhemus* R 218 √Anthony E. Vaz* R 237"
  26. ^ Staff. "MUCH BELOVED SEASIDE HEIGHTS COUNCILWOMAN, JOANN M. DUSZCZAK DIES AT THE AGE OF 57", Ocean County Gazette, January 4, 2011. Accessed November 28, 2011.
  27. ^ Mikle, Jean. "Political ties worth a million to Ocean GOP boss's law firm: Gilmore profits from no-bid, public legal posts", Asbury Park Press, August 21, 2007. Accessed July 13, 2011. "Gilmore is head of the Ocean County Republican Party and one of a dozen or so unelected political bosses who determine, in large part, what happens in state and local governments in New Jersey.... He grew up in Seaside Heights, where his grandfather, J. Stanley Tunney, was a political figure, serving as mayor for 25 years."
  28. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 28, 2012.
  29. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  30. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. http://www.nj.gov/governor/about/. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  31. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. http://www.nj.gov/governor/lt/. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  32. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2011.
  33. ^ 2011 Organization Comments by Freeholder Director Joseph H. Vicari, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2011.
  34. ^ Data for the Seaside Heights Public School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed July 13, 2011.
  35. ^ Staff. "HUGH J. BOYD JR., 55", The Philadelphia Inquirer, November 26, 1983. Accessed July 13, 2011. "During summer months, he was the barrel-chested boss of the Seaside Heights beach patrol, in the fall he picked up his striped shirt and whistle to work as a football official, and - year-round - he worked as principal of a school that was named for him."
  36. ^ Staff. "Wing named to honor school board member", Asbury Park Press, May 30, 2007. Accessed July 13, 2011. ""The Seaside Heights Board of Education and Toms River Regional Schools will celebrate the dedication of the Harry M Smith III Early Childhood Center Memorial Wing at Hugh J Boyd Jr. Elementary School at 2 p.m. Friday.
  37. ^ Seaside Heights Board of Education, Hugh J. Boyd, Jr. Elementary School. Accessed july 13, 2011.
  38. ^ Adelizzi, Joe. "Board OKs school plan in Seaside Toms River district will run school, improve it", Asbury Park Press, September 18, 2003. Accessed April 12, 2011.
  39. ^ Central Regional School District 2010 School Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed April 22, 2008. "The Central Regional School District is located in the Bayville section of Berkeley Township and draws from the constituent districts of Berkeley Township, Island Heights, Ocean Gate, Seaside Heights, and Seaside Park."
  40. ^ Data for the Central Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed May 24, 2011.
  41. ^ Ocean County Bus/Rail Connection, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed July 13, 2011.
  42. ^ a b c d Jones, Marilyn. "Being there: New Jersey -- Seaside Heights popular, even without MTV fame", Orlando Sentinel, July 11, 2010. Accessed July 13, 2011. "MTV has been rocking the shore town since 1998, and again in 2002, when Seaside Heights was selected as the site for Total Request Live and other shows including Shore Thing. MTV also filmed True Life: I Have A Summer Share in Seaside Heights, and rock bands including Bon Jovi have used the borough visually for album covers and music videos."
  43. ^ Ryan, Joe. "Setting and spiking at Seaside Heights", The Star-Ledger, July 7, 2007. Accessed July 13, 2011.
  44. ^ "Shore Residents Express Anger with MTV". PointPleasantChamber.com. http://www.pointpleasantchamber.com/index.php/local-ocean-and-monmouth-county-news/76-shore-residents-express-anger-with-mtv-qjersey-shoreq-shows-premise. 
  45. ^ Schwartz, Alison. "Snooki's New Year's Eve Ball to Drop in New Jersey", People (magazine), December 31, 2010. Accessed July 13, 2011. "Nicole 'Snooki' Polizzi will drop inside a ball on New Year's Eve in a location where she has fallen before: The Jersey Shore. Although it was reported earlier this month that the MTV reality star would ring in 2011 in New York City's Times Square, the location has been switched to Seaside Heights, N.J., where season 1 and the upcoming season 3 of Jersey Shore were filmed."
  46. ^ "‘Jersey Shore’ Season 5 Wraps Up Filming". RealityAired.com. http://www.realityaired.com/2011/shows/the-jersey-shore/jersey-shore-season-5-wraps-up-filming/. 
  47. ^ Nark, Jason. "Seaside Heights cashing in on 'Jersey Shore'", The Philadelphia Inquirer, July 31, 2010. Accessed July 13, 2011. "In 2004, MTV's True Life: I'm a Jersey Shore Girl first chronicled the spectacle of spray-tanned, tough-talking 'guidettes' who invaded Ocean and Monmouth counties' Shore towns each summer to bag a buff 'guido' with gleaming spikes atop his head."
  48. ^ Pritchard, Michael. "MTV'S 'SHORE THING' BACK IN SEASIDE HEIGHTS", The Press of Atlantic City, April 19, 2002. Accessed July 13, 2011. "Being cool in Seaside Heights will be a "Shore Thing" this summer as MTV announced it is returning to the resort for its annual summer beach house location. The network will takeover a beach house adjacent to the resort's boardwalk for "MTV's Shore Thing," the name of the network's summer programming."
  49. ^ Wow! – Bon Jovi Music Video Filmed Entirely In Seaside Heights, New Jersey – Back In 1985
  50. ^ Filming locations for Beer League, Internet Movie Database. Accessed August 6, 2007.
  51. ^ Staff. "Soap opera "One Life To Live" to be filmed on boardwalk", Asbury Park Press, March 30, 2008. Accessed July 13, 2011. "Filming for the soap opera One Life To Live is scheduled for the week of April 14 at popular Seaside Heights boardwalk spots including Casino Pier..."

External links

Preceded by
Dover Beaches South
Beaches of New JerseySucceeded by
Seaside Park