Scooby-Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed

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Scooby-Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed
Scooby doo two poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byRaja Gosnell
Produced byCharles Roven
Richard Suckle
Written byJames Gunn
Based onScooby-Doo created 
by Joe Ruby and Ken Spears
StarringFreddie Prinze Jr.
Sarah Michelle Gellar
Linda Cardellini
Matthew Lillard
Seth Green
Peter Boyle
Tim Blake Nelson
Alicia Silverstone
Music byDavid Newman
CinematographyOliver Wood
Edited byKent Beyda
Production
company
Mosaic Media Group
Distributed byWarner Bros. Pictures
Release dates
  • March 20, 2004 (2004-03-20) (Canada)
  • March 26, 2004 (2004-03-26) (United States)
Running time93 minutes
CountryUnited States
Canada
LanguageEnglish
Budget$80 million
Box office$181,466,833
 
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Scooby-Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed
Scooby doo two poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byRaja Gosnell
Produced byCharles Roven
Richard Suckle
Written byJames Gunn
Based onScooby-Doo created 
by Joe Ruby and Ken Spears
StarringFreddie Prinze Jr.
Sarah Michelle Gellar
Linda Cardellini
Matthew Lillard
Seth Green
Peter Boyle
Tim Blake Nelson
Alicia Silverstone
Music byDavid Newman
CinematographyOliver Wood
Edited byKent Beyda
Production
company
Mosaic Media Group
Distributed byWarner Bros. Pictures
Release dates
  • March 20, 2004 (2004-03-20) (Canada)
  • March 26, 2004 (2004-03-26) (United States)
Running time93 minutes
CountryUnited States
Canada
LanguageEnglish
Budget$80 million
Box office$181,466,833

Scooby-Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed (also known as Scooby 2, Scooby-Doo 2 or Scooby-Doo! Monsters Unleashed) is a 2004 comedy horror film directed by Raja Gosnell, written by James Gunn and released by Warner Bros. Based on the 1969-71 animated television series, Scooby-Doo, Where Are You?, it is the second (chronologically, the fourth and final) installment in the Scooby-Doo live-action film series, and a sequel to 2002's Scooby-Doo. The returning cast features Freddie Prinze Jr. as Fred, Sarah Michelle Gellar as Daphne, Matthew Lillard as Shaggy, Linda Cardellini as Velma, and Neil Fanning as the voice of title protagonist Scooby-Doo. Series newcomers include Seth Green, Tim Blake Nelson, Peter Boyle, and Alicia Silverstone who appear in supporting roles. The film was released on March 26, 2004 to generally unfavorable reviews,[1] and grossed considerably less at the box office than its predecessor.[2]

Plot[edit]

Mystery Inc. (Fred, Daphne, Velma, Shaggy and Scooby-Doo) is attending the grand opening of the Coolsonian Criminology Museum, the premiere exhibit displaying the monster costumes of criminals they dealt with in past cases. However, the celebrations are cut short when the reanimated Pterodactyl Ghost attacks, controlled by the Evil Masked Figure, who boldly declares that Mystery Inc. will be destroyed. He escapes with his quarry and two monster costumes; the Black Knight Ghost and the 10,000 Volt Ghost. Heather Jasper-Howe (Alicia Silverstone), a journalist, starts a smear campaign against the gang to discredit them, mainly stemming from a personal feud with Daphne. Velma finds a pterodactyl scale and analyses it, confirming it to be real. The gang conclude one of their old enemies is the masked man wanting revenge. They at first suspect their old enemy Jonathon Jacobo (Tim Blake Nelson), who was the original creator of the Pterodactyl Ghost and knew how to create real monsters and bring them to life, but then news breaks out to the gang that Jacobo has drowned during an attempted escape from prison, so the gang guess Jeremiah Wickles (Peter Boyle), their first foe and the Black Knight Ghost's portrayer, and Jacobo's roommate in prison, is responsible.

The gang travel to Wickles' mansion where they find mysterious green footprints like the scale leading to the library. Fred, Daphne and Velma find an instruction manual on how to create monsters; while Shaggy and Scooby are chased by the reanimated Black Knight but not before finding a note reading "Faux Ghost tonite" which they take as a clue. Daphne fends the knight off until the gang can escape. Shaggy and Scooby sneak into the nightclub, the "Faux Ghost", where many of the convicted criminals they put away hang out, including Wickles who claims he has reformed from his criminal ways; but quickly they are recognized and thrown out. Velma learns the key ingredient to making monsters is a fictional substance called "randomonium". Patrick Wisely (Seth Green), the museum curator, who Velma has a crush on, comes to aid the gang but when they go to the museum, they find the rest of the costumes have been stolen. Shaggy and Scooby encounter the distressed Patrick, and then follow Wickles to the old mining town where the rest of the gang realise randomonium was mined. Wickles is proven to be innocent when the gang learns he plans to turn the mining town into an amusement park for children.

Reuniting, the gang find the Monster Hive, finding a machine which brings the monster costumes to life. Shaggy and Scooby mess with the machine's control panel, causing several monsters to be reanimated. The gang flee with the control panel, as the Evil Masked Figure attacks Coolsville and Howe asks the gang to turn themselves in to save the citizens. The gang flee to their old high school clubhouse where they realise they will be able to reverse the Monster Hive's effects by altering the control panel's wiring. Outside, Shaggy and Scooby lament on their habit of being clumsy and desire to be heroes. Captain Cutler's Ghost rises out of the nearby bayou, forcing the gang to flee in the Mystery Machine back to the mining town. Fred and Daphne fight the Black Knight and electrical 10,000 Volt Ghost, defeating them with a pair of jumper cables. Velma ventures into the factory and finds a shrine to Jacobo, actually made by Patrick who was Jacobo's student at one time, but is not the bad guy proving that by saving Velma's life. However, he is captured and dragged away by the Pterodactyl Ghost. After this, Shaggy and Scooby run into the Cotton Candy Glob which threatens to destroy them. Amazed at this monster, instead of running away as they usually do, they instead begin to eat the cotton candy glob. During the process of being eaten, the Cotton Candy Glob begins to cry out "No! I'll give you cavities!".

The gang confront the Evil Masked Figure who has all of them held captive by the Tar Monster, aside from Scooby, who grabs a nearby fire extinguisher to freeze the monster and makes his way to the machine and inserts the control panel, turning the monsters back to costumes. The Evil Masked Figure tries to escape but trips on a broken cat walk and is left dangling from it by his cape. The authorities, press and Coolsville citizens arrive, where the gang unmasked the Evil Masked Figure as Howe - only to then unmask her as none other than Jacobo, alive and well. Jacobo survived his apparent "death" and was photographed outside the museum before it opened, found by Velma at the shrine. Jacobo and Howe's cameraman Ned (Zahf Paroo) are arrested, whilst Mystery, Inc. are welcomed back by Coolsville with open arms. Velma and Patrick agree to go out again, Fred and Daphne remain at a peaceful relationship and Shaggy and Scooby stay best pals. The main cast dance with Ruben Studdard at the Faux Ghost in the ending scenes.

In a post-credits scene, Scooby is shown in a creepy hall playing the "Scooby-Doo 2" game on a Game Boy Advance. He then turns the game screen towards the camera, and says "Game Boy Advance secret code", showing a cheat code for the game he was playing.

Cast[edit]

Voices[edit]

Cameos[edit]

Reception[edit]

The film opened March 26, 2004 and grossed $29,438,331 (over 3,312 theaters, $8,888 average) on its opening weekend, ranking #1.[3] It grossed a total of $84,216,833 in North America, and went on to earn $181,466,833 worldwide, more than $90 million less than the $275,650,703 worldwide Scooby-Doo grossed two years earlier. It was the 28th most successful film of 2004,[4] and currently ranks as the 6th highest grossing film featuring a dog as a major character.[5]

Despite its moderate box-office success, the critical response was mostly negative, more so than for the previous film. With 113 reviews counted it scored 21% on the review aggregator web site Rotten Tomatoes,[6] and a 34 out of 100 from Metacritic based on 38 reviews,[7] indicating "Generally negative reviews".

The film won a Razzie Award for Worst Remake or Sequel.[8]

Home Media Release[edit]

The film was released onto DVD and VHS on September 14, 2004. The DVD included deleted scenes from the film's production and other features such as a 'making of' and trailers. On August 18, 2010, it was announced by Warner Brothers that both the film and its predecessor would be released as a double feature on Blu-ray in November 2010.[9]

Monsters[edit]

The film featured a number of monsters from the classic Scooby Doo cartoons. The Black Knight Ghost, The Zombie, Captain Cutler, and Miner 49er were portrayed in costumes with CGI effects, whilst the rest were completely made from CGI animation. Some of the monsters look entirely different from their appearances in the cartoons, although this was done for realism. Also, some of the characters who posed as the monsters in the movie are not the same characters from the series. The monsters in the film were:

There were other monsters that made cameos, such as the Ghost Clown, the Giggling Green Ghost, Redbeard's Ghost, the Creeper, the Headless Horseman, the Ghost of Merlin, the Rambling Ghost, the Spooky Space Kook, the Mermaid's Ghost, the Ghost of Dr. Coffin, Zen Tuo, the Phantom of Milo Booth, Ozark Witch, Viking Ghost, Wax Phantom, Ghost of Finnyan McDuff, Swamp Monster, Anthos the Warlock, Giant Mantis Creature and Chickenstein, but these monsters weren't brought to life by the Evil Masked Figure or by Shaggy and Scooby by accident. Redbeard was seen when Fred, Velma and Daphne were looking at the Evil Masked Figure and the Creeper was the costume Scooby and Shaggy were with when the Pterodactyl Ghost was rampaging.

Soundtrack[edit]

A soundtrack[10] was released on March 23, 2004.

  1. "Don't Wanna Think About You" by Simple Plan
  2. "You Get What You Give" by New Radicals
  3. "Boom Shack-A-Lak" by Apache Indian
  4. "Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)" by Big Brovaz
  5. "The Rockafeller Skank" by Fatboy Slim
  6. "Wooly Bully" by Bad Manners
  7. "Shining Star" by Ruben Studdard
  8. "Flagpole Sitta" by Harvey Danger
  9. "Get Ready for This" by 2 Unlimited
  10. "Play That Funky Music" by Wild Cherry
  11. "Here We Go" by Bowling for Soup
  12. "Love Shack" by The B-52's
  13. "Friends Forever" by Puffy AmiYumi

Deleted scenes[edit]

Cancelled sequel[edit]

During the filming of Scooby-Doo 2, Warner Bros. gave the green light for production of a sequel. Writers Dan Forman and Paul Foley were hired by WB to write the script for Scooby-Doo 3.[11] However, after the release of Scooby-Doo 2, Warner Bros. felt the film should have made more money, which prevented the production of another sequel. During a press conference for the release of Without a Paddle, Matthew Lillard stated that the third film had been cancelled and was not going to go ahead due to the second film being less successful than expected.[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]