Sasha (name)

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Sasha
Pronunciation/ˈsæʃə/ SASH
/ˈsɑːʃə/ SAH-shə
Genderunisex
Origin
Word/NameSlavic
Meaningdefender, helper of mankind; truth, true; sunshine; gentle, soft
Other names
Related namesAleksandra, Aleksander, Saša, Sascha, Sacha, Sasza, Satyana
 
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Sasha
Pronunciation/ˈsæʃə/ SASH
/ˈsɑːʃə/ SAH-shə
Genderunisex
Origin
Word/NameSlavic
Meaningdefender, helper of mankind; truth, true; sunshine; gentle, soft
Other names
Related namesAleksandra, Aleksander, Saša, Sascha, Sacha, Sasza, Satyana

Sasha is a unisex given name. It originated in countries of Central, Eastern and Southern Europe as a diminutive of Aleksander and Aleksandra. It is also found as a surname, although this is very rare. Alternative spellings include: Саша (Russian, Serbian), Сашо (Bulgarian), Саше (Macedonian), Saša (Slovenian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Lithuanian), Sasza (Polish), Сашко (Ukrainian), Sascha (German), Sasja (Dutch and Swedish), and Sacha (French).

This name is especially common in Europe where it is used primarily by males as a diminutive of Alexander, although females may also use it as a diminutive of Alexandra. Despite its popularity in informal usage, the name is rarely recorded on birth certificates in countries such as Russia, Ukraine, the Czech Republic, and Slovakia, as it is considered a diminutive and not a formal name. Exceptions are Serbia and Croatia.

In Germany, the civil registry offices allow the inscription of Sascha in birth certificates as a formal name but only for boys.[citation needed]

In French-speaking regions (France, Québec, Belgium...), it is given predominantly to males (Sacha). In other countries, it is given predominantly to females.[citation needed] In the United States the name is almost exclusively used for girls, at number 369 in the ranking of U.S. baby names, although it didn't gain popularity until the 1970s.

In the early period of Zionism, the name was common among Jewish males in Ottoman- and British-ruled Palestine, reflecting the East European origin of many pioneers. It became less common in 1950s and 1960s Israel, but revived with the new waves of Russian immigration to Israel in the 1970s and the larger wave of the 1990s.[citation needed]

Notable bearers of this name[edit]

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Fictional Sashas[edit]

Mythical[edit]

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