Sardax

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Sardax is the pseudonym for a talented English FemDom artist based in London. Sardax’s ink drawings and watercolours were a hobby that has now evolved into two published books, a magazine, limited prints and commissioned pieces. He’s also created book covers plus countless book and magazine illustrations in addition to graphic art for logos, on-line banners, flyers and posters.[1][2] Sardax has a website, sardix.com, for devotees of female domination. There is some free content, but the majority is accessible by paid membership only. A search on the web will yield multiple sites with Sardax artwork despite the author’s copyright.

Sardax’s first book, The Art of Sardax published in 2007 by The Erotic Print Society, contains over 75 classic Sardax images with accompanying erotic texts.[3] The book soon sold out worldwide. On August 1, 2014 Amazon and Amazon UK were offering used copies of the book with standard delivery at a cost range of $292.62 to $3,118.99.[4]

Sardax’s second publication was a magazine entitled Fabulous Fem Dom Art, also published in 2007.[5] This magazine has over 80 drawings and sketches that were first produced for the Alice Kerr-Sutherland Society, a group promoting a Loving Domestic Discipline lifestyle.[6]

In addition in 2007, Sardax created his first ever series of limited edition prints, 'Shanghai Bizarre'. They are sold by ObsessionArt Ltd of London.[7] In 2008 the 'Shanghai Bizarre' series was published in Skin Two magazine.

The second book (third publication) by Sardax is Venus in Furs. It was released July 2013. This is a new translation by Sardax himself from the original German of Leopold von Sacher-Masoch’s novella. Although first published in 1870 this book tells a timeless story of FemDom, the power dynamic that exists between men and women.[8] Sardax worked on Venus in Furs for 10 years and describes this book as a “labour of love.” Of interest is that the sexual activities of this story led to the term ‘Masochism’ derived from Sacher-Masoch’s name.

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