Santa Barbara, California

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City of Santa Barbara
City
The coastline of Santa Barbara
The coastline of Santa Barbara
Flag of City of Santa Barbara
Flag
Official seal of City of Santa Barbara
Seal
Location in Santa Barbara County and the state of California
Location in Santa Barbara County and the state of California
Coordinates: 34°25′33″N 119°42′51″W / 34.42583°N 119.71417°W / 34.42583; -119.71417Coordinates: 34°25′33″N 119°42′51″W / 34.42583°N 119.71417°W / 34.42583; -119.71417
Country United States
State California
CountySanta Barbara
Government
 • MayorHelene Schneider
 • SenateHannah-Beth Jackson (D)
 • AssemblyDas Williams (D)
 • U. S. CongressLois Capps (D)
Area[1]
 • Total41.968 sq mi (108.697 km2)
 • Land19.468 sq mi (50.422 km2)
 • Water22.500 sq mi (58.275 km2)  53.61%
Elevation49 ft (15 m)
Population (2012 estimate)[2]
 • Total90,893
 • Density4,541/sq mi (1,753/km2)
Time zonePST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST)PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP codes93101-93103, 93105-93111, 93116-93118, 93120-93121, 93130, 93140, 93150, 93160, 93190, 93199
Area code(s)805
FIPS code06-69070
GNIS feature ID1661401
Websitewww.santabarbaraca.gov
 
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For the island, see Santa Barbara Island.
City of Santa Barbara
City
The coastline of Santa Barbara
The coastline of Santa Barbara
Flag of City of Santa Barbara
Flag
Official seal of City of Santa Barbara
Seal
Location in Santa Barbara County and the state of California
Location in Santa Barbara County and the state of California
Coordinates: 34°25′33″N 119°42′51″W / 34.42583°N 119.71417°W / 34.42583; -119.71417Coordinates: 34°25′33″N 119°42′51″W / 34.42583°N 119.71417°W / 34.42583; -119.71417
Country United States
State California
CountySanta Barbara
Government
 • MayorHelene Schneider
 • SenateHannah-Beth Jackson (D)
 • AssemblyDas Williams (D)
 • U. S. CongressLois Capps (D)
Area[1]
 • Total41.968 sq mi (108.697 km2)
 • Land19.468 sq mi (50.422 km2)
 • Water22.500 sq mi (58.275 km2)  53.61%
Elevation49 ft (15 m)
Population (2012 estimate)[2]
 • Total90,893
 • Density4,541/sq mi (1,753/km2)
Time zonePST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST)PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP codes93101-93103, 93105-93111, 93116-93118, 93120-93121, 93130, 93140, 93150, 93160, 93190, 93199
Area code(s)805
FIPS code06-69070
GNIS feature ID1661401
Websitewww.santabarbaraca.gov

Santa Barbara is the county seat of Santa Barbara County, California. Situated on a south-facing section of coastline, the longest such section on the West Coast of the United States, the city lies between the steeply rising Santa Ynez Mountains and the Pacific Ocean. Santa Barbara's climate is often described as Mediterranean, and the city has been promoted as the "American Riviera".[3] As of the census of 2010, the city had a population of 88,410, a loss of 1,190 from the previous census, making it the second most populous city in the county after Santa Maria[4] while the contiguous urban area, which includes the cities of Goleta and Carpinteria, along with the unincorporated regions of Isla Vista, Montecito, Mission Canyon, Hope Ranch, Summerland, and others, has an approximate population of 220,000. The population of the entire county in 2010 was 423,895.[5]

In addition to being a popular tourist and resort destination, the city economy includes a large service sector, education, technology, health care, finance, agriculture, manufacturing, and local government. In 2004, the service sector accounted for fully 35% of local employment.[6] Education in particular is well represented, with five institutions of higher learning on the south coast (the University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara City College, Westmont College, Antioch University, and the Brooks Institute of Photography). The Santa Barbara Airport serves the city, as does Amtrak. U.S. Highway 101 connects the Santa Barbara area with Los Angeles to the southeast and San Francisco to the northwest. Behind the city, in and beyond the Santa Ynez Mountains, is the Los Padres National Forest, which contains several remote wilderness areas. Channel Islands National Park and Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary are located approximately 20 miles offshore.

History[edit]

Evidence of human habitation of the area begins at least 13,000 years ago. Evidence for a Paleoindian presence includes a fluted Clovis-like point found in the 1980s along the western Santa Barbara County coast, as well as the remains of Arlington Springs Man, found on Santa Rosa Island in the 1960s. An estimated 8,000 to 10,000 Chumash lived on the south coast of Santa Barbara County at the time of the first European explorations.[citation needed]

Five villages flourished in what is today Santa Barbara:

  1. Mispu (now occupied by the City College);
  2. Syukhtun, chief Yanonalit’s large village between Bath and Chapala streets (later called “El Baño”, site of El Baño pool);
  3. Amolomol at the mouth of Mission Creek;
  4. and Swetete, above the present bird refuge.[7]

Spanish period[edit]

Mission Santa Barbara, known as "the Queen of the Missions," was founded in 1786.

Portuguese explorer João Cabrilho (Spanish: Cabrillo), sailing for the Kingdom of Spain, sailed through what is now called the Santa Barbara Channel in 1542, anchoring briefly in the area. In 1602, Spanish maritime explorer Sebastián Vizcaíno gave the name "Santa Barbara" to the channel and also to one of the Channel Islands.[8]

A land expedition led by Gaspar de Portolà visited in 1769, and Franciscan missionary Juan Crespi, who accompanied the expedition, named a large native town "Laguna de la Concepcion". Cabrillo's earlier name, however, is the one that has survived.

The first permanent European residents were Spanish missionaries and soldiers under Felipe de Neve, who came in 1782 to build the Presidio. They were sent both to fortify the region against expansion by other powers such as England and Russia, and to convert the natives to Christianity. Many of the Spaniards brought their families with them, and those formed the nucleus of the small town – at first just a cluster of adobes – that surrounded the Presidio. Mission Santa Barbara was dedicated December 4, 1786, the feast day of Saint Barbara.[9] It was dedicated by Padre Fermín Lasuén, who succeeded Padre Junipero Serra as the second president and founder of the California Franciscan Mission Chain. The Mission fathers began the slow work of converting the native Chumash to Christianity, building a village for them on the Mission grounds. During the following decades, many of the natives died of diseases such as smallpox, against which they had no natural immunity.[10]

The most dramatic event of the Spanish period was the powerful 1812 earthquake, and tsunami, with an estimated magnitude of 7.1, which destroyed the Mission as well as the rest of the town; water reached as high as present-day Anapamu street, and carried a ship half a mile up Refugio Canyon.[11][12] Following the earthquake, the Mission fathers chose to rebuild in a grander manner, and it is this construction that survives to the present day, the best-preserved of the California Missions.

The Spanish period ended in 1822 with the end of the Mexican War of Independence, which terminated 300 years of colonial rule. The flag of Mexico went up the flagpole at the Presidio, but only for 24 years.

Mexican and Rancho period[edit]

After the forced secularization of the Missions in 1833, successive Mexican Governors distributed the large land tracts formerly held by the Franciscan Order to various families in order to reward service or build alliances. These land grants to local notable families mark the beginning of the "Rancho Period" in California and Santa Barbara history. The population remained sparse, with enormous cattle operations run by wealthy families. It was during this period that Richard Henry Dana, Jr. first visited Santa Barbara and wrote about the culture and people of Santa Barbara in his book Two Years Before the Mast.

Mural Room (formerly Board of Supervisors' Hearing Room) within the Santa Barbara County Courthouse. Wall murals depict the history of Santa Barbara. The room is used occasionally as a courtroom.

Santa Barbara fell bloodlessly to a battalion of American soldiers under John C. Frémont on December 27, 1846, during the Mexican–American War, and after the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848 it became part of the expanding United States.

Middle and late 19th century[edit]

State Street in the 1880s looking north from Canon Perdido Street

Change came quickly after Santa Barbara's acquisition by the United States. The population doubled between 1850 and 1860. In 1851, land surveyor Salisbury Haley designed the street grid, famously botching the block measurements, misaligning the streets, thereby creating doglegs at certain intersections.[13] Wood construction replaced adobe as American settlers moved in; during the Gold Rush years and following, the town became a haven for bandits and gamblers, and a dangerous and lawless place. Charismatic gambler and highwayman Jack Powers had virtual control of the town in the early 1850s, until driven out by a posse organized in San Luis Obispo. English gradually supplanted Spanish as the language of daily life, becoming the language of official record in 1870.[14] The first newspaper, the Santa Barbara Gazette, was founded in 1855.[15]

While the Civil War had little effect on Santa Barbara, the disastrous drought of 1863 ended the Rancho Period, as most of the cattle died and ranchos were broken up and sold. The building of Stearns Wharf in 1872 enhanced Santa Barbara's commercial and tourist accessibility; previously goods and visitors had to transfer from steamboats to smaller craft to row ashore. During the 1870s, writer Charles Nordhoff promoted the town as a health resort and destination for well-to-do travelers from other parts of the U.S.; many of them came, and many stayed. The luxurious Arlington Hotel dated from this period. In 1887 the railroad finally went through to Los Angeles, and in 1901 to San Francisco: Santa Barbara was now easily accessible by land and by sea, and subsequent development was brisk.[16]

Peter J. Barber, an architect, designed many Late Victorian style residences, and served twice as mayor, in 1880 and again in 1890.

Early 20th century to World War II[edit]

Just before the turn of the 20th century, oil was discovered at the Summerland Oil Field, and the region along the beach east of Santa Barbara sprouted numerous oil derricks and piers for drilling offshore. This was the first offshore oil development in the world; oil drilling offshore would become a contentious practice in the Santa Barbara area, which continues to the present day.[17]

Santa Barbara housed the world's largest movie studio during the era of silent film. Flying A Studios, a division of the American Film Manufacturing Company, operated on two city blocks centered at State and Mission between 1910 and 1922, with the industry shutting down locally and moving to Hollywood once it outgrew the area, needing the resources of a larger city. Flying A and the other smaller local studios produced approximately 1,200 films during their tenure in Santa Barbara, of which approximately 100 survive.[18][19][20]

During this period, the Loughead Aircraft Company was established on lower State Street, and regularly tested seaplanes off of East Beach. This was the genesis of what would later become Lockheed.

The new Santa Barbara County Courthouse was dedicated on August 14, 1929.

The earthquake of June 29, 1925, the first destructive earthquake in California since the 1906 San Francisco quake, destroyed much of Santa Barbara and killed 13 or 14 people. The low death toll is attributed to the early hour (6:23 a.m., before most people were out on the streets, vulnerable to falling masonry). While this quake, like the one in 1812, was centered in the Santa Barbara Channel, it caused no tsunami, and most of the damage was caused by two onshore aftershocks. It came at an opportune time for rebuilding, since a movement for architectural reform and unification around a Spanish Colonial style was already underway. Under the leadership of Pearl Chase, many of the city's famous buildings rose as part of the rebuilding process, including the Santa Barbara County Courthouse, sometimes praised as the "most beautiful public building in the United States."

During World War II, Santa Barbara was home to Marine Corps Air Station Santa Barbara; Naval Reserve Center Santa Barbara at the harbor; was near to the Army's Camp Cook, present-day Vandenberg Air Force Base; and contained a hospital for treating servicemen wounded in the Pacific Theatre. On February 23, 1942, not long after the outbreak of war in the Pacific, the Japanese submarine I-17 surfaced offshore and lobbed 16 shells at the Ellwood Oil Field, about 10 miles (16 km) west of Santa Barbara, in the first wartime attack by an enemy power on the U.S. mainland since the War of 1812. Although the shelling was inaccurate and only caused about $500 damage to a catwalk, panic was immediate. Many Santa Barbara residents fled, and land values plummeted to historic lows.

After World War II[edit]

After the war many of the servicemen who had seen Santa Barbara returned to stay. The population surged by 10,000 people between the end of the war and 1950. This burst of growth had dramatic consequences for the local economy and infrastructure. Highway 101 was built through town during this period, and newly built Lake Cachuma began supplying water via a tunnel dug through the mountains between 1950 and 1956.[21]

Local relations with the oil industry gradually soured through the period. Production at Summerland had ended, Elwood was winding down, and to find new fields oil companies carried out seismic exploration of the Channel using explosives, a controversial practice that local fishermen claimed harmed their catch. The culminating disaster, and one of the formative events in the modern environmental movement, was the blowout at Union Oil's Platform A on the Dos Cuadras Field, about eight miles (13 km) southeast of Santa Barbara in the Santa Barbara Channel, on January 28, 1969. Approximately 100,000 barrels (16,000 m3) of oil surged out of a huge undersea break, fouling hundreds of square miles of ocean and all the coastline from Ventura to Goleta, as well north facing beaches on the Channel Islands. Two legislative consequences of the spill in the next year were the passages of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA); locally, outraged citizens formed GOO (Get Oil Out).[22] Santa Barbara's business community strove to attract development until the surge in the anti-growth movement in the 1970s. Many "clean" industries, especially aerospace firms such as Raytheon and Delco Electronics, moved to town in the 1950s and 1960s, bringing employees from other parts of the U.S. UCSB itself became a major employer.[22] In 1975, the city passed an ordinance restricting growth to a maximum of 85,000 residents, through zoning. Growth in the adjacent Goleta Valley could be shut down by denying water meters to developers seeking permits. As a result of these changes, growth slowed down, but prices rose sharply.[23][24]

When voters approved connection to State water supplies in 1991, parts of the city, especially outlying areas, resumed growth, but more slowly than during the boom period of the 1950s and 1960s. While the slower growth preserved the quality of life for most residents and prevented the urban sprawl notorious in the Los Angeles basin, housing in the Santa Barbara area was in short supply, and prices soared: in 2006, only six percent of residents could afford a median-value house. As a result, many people who work in Santa Barbara commute from adjacent, more affordable areas, such as Santa Maria, Lompoc, and Ventura. The resultant traffic on incoming arteries, in particular the stretch of Highway 101 between Ventura and Santa Barbara, is another problem being addressed by long-range planners.[25]

Notable wildfires[edit]

Several destructive fires affected Santa Barbara during this time: the 1964 Coyote Fire, which burned 67,000 acres (270 km2) of backcountry along with 106 homes; the smaller, but quickly moving, Sycamore Fire in 1977, which burned 200 homes; the disastrous 1990 Painted Cave Fire, which incinerated over 500 homes in only several hours, during an intense Sundowner wind event; the November 2008 Tea Fire, which destroyed 210 homes in the foothills of Santa Barbara and Montecito; and the 2009 Jesusita Fire that burned 8,733 acres (35.34 km2) and destroyed 160 homes above the San Roque region of Santa Barbara.[26][27]

Geography[edit]

Looking north from a Santa Barbara street toward "the Riviera" and the Santa Inez Mountains beyond

Santa Barbara is located about 90 miles (145 km) WNW of Los Angeles, along the Pacific coast. This stretch of coast along southern Santa Barbara County is sometimes referred to as "The American Riviera",[28] presumably because its geography and climate are similar to that of areas along the northern Mediterranean Sea coast (especially in southern France) known as the Riviera. The Santa Ynez Mountains, an east–west trending range, rise dramatically behind the city, with several peaks exceeding 4,000 feet (1,200 m). Covered with chaparral and sandstone outcrops, they make a scenic backdrop to the town. Sometimes, perhaps once every three years, snow falls on the mountains, but it rarely stays for more than a few days. Nearer to town, directly east and adjacent to Mission Santa Barbara, is an east-west ridge known locally as "the Riviera," traversed by a road called "Alameda Padre Serra" (shortened APS, which translates to "Father Serra's pathway").

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 42.0 square miles (108.8 km2), of which 19.5 square miles (51 km2) of it is land and 22.5 square miles (58 km2) of it (53.61%) is water. The high official figures for water is due to the extension of the city limit into the ocean, including a strip of city reaching out into the sea and inland again to keep the Santa Barbara Airport (SBA) within the city boundary.

Climate[edit]

Santa Barbara experiences a warm-summer Mediterranean climate (Köppen: Csb) characteristic of coastal California. Because the city lies along the ocean, onshore breezes moderate temperatures resulting in warmer winters and cooler summers compared with places farther inland. In the winter, storms reach California, some of which bring heavy rainfall. Locally the Santa Ynez mountains create an upslope flow causing higher rainfall than other coastal areas. Summers in Southern California are mostly rainless due to the presence of a high-pressure area over the eastern Pacific. In the fall, downslope winds, locally called "Sundowners", can raise temperatures into the high 90s creating a heat-wave, increasing the chance of brush fires in the foothills north of the city. Rainfall is extremely erratic and in exceptional years like 1940–1941 and 1997–1998 over 40 inches (1.0 m) of rain has fallen in a year,[29] but in dry seasons less than 6 inches (150 mm) is not unheard of. Snow sometimes covers the Santa Ynez Mountains but has not been recorded in the city itself except for a few flakes in 1939.

Climate data for Santa Barbara, California (1981–2010 Normals)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)89
(32)
89
(32)
96
(36)
101
(38)
101
(38)
103
(39)
108
(42)
99
(37)
105
(41)
103
(39)
97
(36)
92
(33)
108
(42)
Average high °F (°C)64.7
(18.2)
65.4
(18.6)
66.1
(18.9)
69.0
(20.6)
69.6
(20.9)
71.2
(21.8)
74.7
(23.7)
76.0
(24.4)
75.1
(23.9)
72.8
(22.7)
68.9
(20.5)
64.7
(18.2)
69.9
(21.1)
Average low °F (°C)46.4
(8)
48.1
(8.9)
49.8
(9.9)
51.8
(11)
54.6
(12.6)
57.5
(14.2)
60.4
(15.8)
60.4
(15.8)
59.6
(15.3)
56.2
(13.4)
50.3
(10.2)
46.7
(8.2)
53.5
(11.9)
Record low °F (°C)20
(−7)
27
(−3)
30
(−1)
30
(−1)
36
(2)
42
(6)
44
(7)
46
(8)
38
(3)
34
(1)
28
(−2)
25
(−4)
20
(−7)
Rainfall inches (mm)4.14
(105.2)
4.68
(118.9)
3.59
(91.2)
0.77
(19.6)
0.35
(8.9)
0.09
(2.3)
0.01
(0.3)
0.03
(0.8)
0.29
(7.4)
0.52
(13.2)
1.48
(37.6)
2.63
(66.8)
18.58
(472.2)
Avg. rainy days (≥ 0.01 in)6.56.36.52.91.40.90.40.51.21.73.84.937
Source: Western Regional Climate Center[30]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
18602,351
18704,25581.0%
18803,460−18.7%
18905,86469.5%
19006,58712.3%
191011,65977.0%
192019,44166.7%
193033,61372.9%
194034,9584.0%
195044,91328.5%
196058,76830.8%
197070,21519.5%
198074,4146.0%
199085,57115.0%
200089,6004.7%
201088,410−1.3%
Est. 201290,8932.8%
State Census data[31]
2012 estimate

2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census[32] reported that Santa Barbara had a population of 88,410. The population density was 2,106.6 people per square mile (813.4/km²). The racial makeup of Santa Barbara was 66,411 (75.1%) White, 1,420 (1.6%) African American, 892 (1.0%) Native American, 3,062 (3.5%) Asian (1.0% Chinese, 0.6% Filipino, 0.5% Japanese, 0.4% Korean, 0.4% Indian, 0.2% Vietnamese, 0.4% other), 116 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 13,032 (14.7%) from other races, and 3,477 (3.9%) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 33,591 persons (38.0%). Non-Hispanic Whites were 45,852 persons (52.2%)

The Census reported that 86,783 people (98.2% of the population) lived in households, 1,172 (1.3%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 455 (0.5%) were institutionalized.

Of the 35,449 households, 8,768 (24.7%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 13,240 (37.3%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 3,454 (9.7%) had a female householder with no husband present, and 1,539 (4.3%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 2,420 (6.8%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 339 (1.0%) same-sex married couples or partnerships; 11,937 households (33.7%) were made up of individuals and 4,340 (12.2%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45. There were 18,233 families (51.4% of all households); the average family size was 3.13.

The population was spread out with 16,468 people (18.6%) under the age of 18, 10,823 people (12.2%) aged 18 to 24, 26,241 people (29.7%) aged 25 to 44, 22,305 people (25.2%) aged 45 to 64, and 12,573 people (14.2%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.8 years. For every 100 females, there were 98.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.7 males.

There were 37,820 housing units at an average density of 901.2 per square mile (347.9/km²), of which 13,784 (38.9%) were owner-occupied, and 21,665 (61.1%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.3%; the rental vacancy rate was 4.1%; 34,056 people (38.5% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 52,727 people (59.6%) lived in rental housing units.

2000[edit]

As of the census[33] of 2000, 92,325 people*, 35,605 households, and 18,941 families resided in the city. The population density was 4,865.3 people per square mile (1,878.1/km²). There were 37,076 housing units at an average density of 1,953.8 per square mile (754.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 74.0% White, 1.8% African American, 1.1% Native American, 2.8% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 16.4% from other races, and 3.9% from two or more races. People of Hispanic or Latino background, of any race, were 35.0% of the population. (*This number was revised to 89,600 when it was discovered that a dormitory population outside the city was erroneously included in the 92,325 figure.[citation needed])

Of the 35,605 households, 24.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.8% were married couples living together, 9.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 46.8% were not families. About 32.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the city, the population was distributed as 19.8% under the age of 18, 13.8% from 18 to 24, 32.3% from 25 to 44, 20.4% from 45 to 64, and 13.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $47,498, and for a family was $57,880. Males had a median income of $37,116 versus $31,911 for females. The per capita income for the city was $26,466. About 7.7% of families and 13.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.8% of those under age 18 and 7.4% of those age 65 or over. If one compares the per capita income to the actual cost of living, the number of people living below the poverty line is considerably higher.

Economy[edit]

Aerospace and defense companies form the basis of the city's private employment as Alliant Techsystems, Channel Technologies Group, Citrix Online, and Raytheon have major operations in the area. Santa Barbara's tourist attractions have made the hospitality industry into a major player in the regional economy. Motel 6 was started in Santa Barbara in 1962.

Top employers[edit]

The top employers in South Santa Barbara County are:[34]

#Employer# of Employees
1University of California, Santa Barbara6,200
2County of Santa Barbara4,000
3Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital2,500
4Santa Barbara City College2,000
5Santa Barbara School Districts1,800
6Raytheon1,500
7Sansum Clinic1,500
8City of Santa Barbara1,000
9United States Postal Service1,000
10Santa Barbara Bank & Trust950

Architecture[edit]

The dominant architectural themes of Santa Barbara are the Spanish Colonial Revival and the related Mission Revival style, encouraged through design guidelines adopted by city leaders after the 1925 earthquake destroyed much of the downtown commercial district. Residential architectural styles in Santa Barbara reflect the era of their construction. Many late 1800s Victorian homes remain downtown and in the "Upper East" neighborhood. California bungalows are common, built in the early decades of the 20th century. Spanish Colonial Revival-style homes built after 1925 are common all over the city, especially in newer upscale residential areas like Montecito and Hope Ranch.

Neighborhoods[edit]

Santa Barbara has a range of neighborhoods with distinctive histories, architectures, and cultures. While considerable consensus exists as to the identification of neighborhood names and boundaries, variations exist between observers. For example, real estate agents may use different names than those used by public utilities or municipal service providers, such as police, fire, or water services. The following is a list of neighborhoods with descriptions and comments on each.

Lower State Street and old town

Culture[edit]

Performing arts[edit]

Santa Barbara contains numerous performing art venues, including the 2,000 seat Arlington Theatre, is the largest indoor performance venue in Santa Barbara and also serves as the premise for the annual Santa Barbara International Film Festival. The Lobero Theatre, a historic building and favorite venue for small concerts; the Granada Theater, the tallest building downtown, originally built by contractor C.B. Urton in 1924, but with the theatre remodeled and reopened in March 2008; and the Santa Barbara Bowl, a 4,562 seat amphitheatre used for outdoor concerts, nestled in a picturesque canyon northwest of Santa Barbara at the base of the Riviera.

The city is considered a haven for classical music lovers with a symphony orchestra, a part-time opera company, and many non-profit classical music groups (such as CAMA). The Music Academy of the West, located in Montecito, hosts an annual music festival in the summer, drawing renowned students and professionals.

Tourist attractions[edit]

Stearns Wharf. The waterfront is a popular tourist attraction.

Santa Barbara is a year-round tourist destination renowned for its fair weather, downtown beaches, and Spanish architecture. Tourism brings more than one billion dollars per year into the local economy, including $80 million in tax revenue.[36] In addition to the city's cultural assets, several iconic destinations lie within the city's limits. Mission Santa Barbara, "The Queen of the Missions," is located on a rise about two miles (3 km) inland from the harbor, and is maintained as an active place of worship, sightseeing stop, and national historic landmark. The Santa Barbara County Courthouse, a red tiled Spanish-Moorish structure, provides a sweeping view of the downtown area from its open air tower. The Presidio of Santa Barbara, a Spanish military installation and chapel built in 1782, was central to the town's early development and remains an icon of the city's colonial roots. In 1855, the Presidio Chapel, being in decay, grew into the Apostolic College of Our Lady of Sorrows, now Our Lady of Sorrows Church.[37] The present church, consecrated on the 147th anniversary of the founding of the presidio on April 21, 1929, remains one of the most beautiful churches in California.

Also famous is the annual Fiesta (originally called "Old Spanish Days"), which is celebrated every year in August. The Fiesta is hosted by the Native Daughters of the Golden West and the Native Sons of the Golden West in a joint committee called the Fiesta Board. Fiesta was originally started as a tourist attraction, like the Rose Bowl, to draw business into the town in the 1920s.

Flower Girls and Las Señoritas are another attraction of Fiesta, as they march and participate in both Fiesta Pequeña (the kickoff of Fiesta) and the various parades. Flower Girls is for girls under 13. They throw roses and other flowers into the crowds. Las Señoritas are their older escorts. Many Señoritas join the Native Daughters at the age of 16.

The annual Santa Barbara French Festival takes place Bastille Day weekend in July. This is the largest French Festival in the western United States.

West Beach Music & Arts Festival is also a fun event for locals and tourists alike. A three-day festival on Downtown Santa Barbara's beautiful West Beach, this concert brings together local artisans, and musical talents such as Pepper, Slightly Stoopid, Ben Harper, Shwayze.

For over 40 years, the Santa Barbara Arts and Crafts Show has been held on Cabrillo Blvd., east of Stearns Wharf and along the beach, attracting thousands of people to see artwork made by artists and crafts people that live in Santa Barbara county. By the rules of the show, all the works displayed must have been made by the artists and craftspeople themselves, who must sell their own goods. The show started in the early 1960s, and now has over 200 booths varying in size and style on any Sunday of the year. The show is also held on some Saturdays that are national holidays, but not during inclement weather.

In recent years, the Santa Barbara International Film Festival, another local non-profit, has also become a major draw bringing over 50,000 attendees during what is usually Santa Barbara's slow season in late January. SBIFF hosts a wide variety of celebrities, premieres, panels and movies from around the world and runs for 10 days.

The annual Summer Solstice Parade draws up to 100,000 people.[38] It is a colorful themed parade put on by local residents, and follows a route along State Street for approximately one mile, ending at Alameda Park. Its main rule is that no written messages or banners with words are allowed. Floats and costumes vary from the whimsical to the outrageous; parties and street events take place throughout the weekend of the parade, the first weekend after the solstice.

Surfing is as much a part of Santa Barbara culture as art. Bruce Brown's cult classic, The Endless Summer, put surfing on the map, and he is often seen around the town. Surfing legend Pat Curren and his son, three time world champion Tom Curren, as well as ten time world champion Kelly Slater, and other popular surf icons such as Jack Johnson call Santa Barbara home. Local surfers are known for going north to The Point, or south to Rincon.

Other tourist-centered attractions include:

Restaurants[edit]

With its abundance of seafood, awareness of farming methods, and nearby wineries, Santa Barbara has many restaurants. In 2010, the SantaBarbara.com Restaurant Guide listed 693 separate restaurants, coffee shops and bakeries in the region.[39]

Museums[edit]

Casa de la Guerra is currently open as a museum.

Many artists make Santa Barbara their home, and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art (SBMA), located on State Street, is one of southern California's finest art museums, featuring nationally recognized collections and special exhibitions of international importance. Highlights of the Museum's remarkable permanent collection include antiquities; 19th-century French, British, and American art; 20th-century and contemporary European, North American, and Latin American art; Asian art; photography; and works on paper. It is also recognized for its innovative education program that serves local and surrounding communities through extensive on-site programming and curriculum resources. Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara (MCASB), located on the top floor of Paseo Nuevo shopping mall, is a non-profit, non-collecting museum dedicated to the exhibition, education, and cultivation of the arts of our time. The premier venue for contemporary art between Los Angeles and San Francisco, MCASB offers free admission to its exhibitions and public programming. Other art venues include the University Art Museum on the UC Santa Barbara Campus, various private galleries, and a wide variety of art and photography shows. The Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History is located immediately behind the Santa Barbara Mission in a complex of Mission-style buildings set in a park-like campus. The Museum offers indoor and outdoor exhibits and a state-of-the-art planetarium. The Santa Barbara Historical Museum is located on De La Guerra Street and offers free admission. The Santa Barbara Maritime Museum is located at 113 Harbor Way (the former Naval Reserve Center Santa Barbara) on the waterfront. The Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum (free admission) houses a collection of historical documents and manuscripts. Two open air museums here are Lotusland and Casa del Herrero, exemplifying the American Country Place era in Santa Barbara. Casa Dolores, center for the popular arts of Mexico, is devoted to the collection, preservation, study, and exhibition of an extensive variety of objects of the popular arts of Mexico.

Media[edit]

Print[edit]

Santa Barbara has two adjudicated, general circulation newspapers: The daily Santa Barbara News-Press (sold by the New York Times Company in 2000 to local resident Wendy P. McCaw), with a circulation of about 25,000, and the Santa Barbara Independent, a weekly with 40,000 audited circulation.[40] Other media available include Edhat Online Magazine Edhat, an aggregation of citizen news and links to other media websites, the Santa Barbara View Santa Barbara View, an award-winning online magazine offering news, views, and commentary, Pacific Coast Business Times, a weekly business journal covering Santa Barbara, Ventura County and San Luis Obispo County;[41] Santa Barbara Life;[42] Noozhawk, a local affairs website, Builder/Architect Gold & Central Coast Edition; and Shape of Voice,[43] a nonprofit youth-created publication that focuses on social justice and youth issues, and City 2.0, a local citizen blog network and news headline aggregation website.

Television[edit]

Radio[edit]

Some Los Angeles radio stations can be heard, although somewhat faintly due to the 85-mile (137 km) distance. Santa Monica-based NPR radio station KCRW can be heard in Santa Barbara at 106.9 MHz, and San Luis Obispo-based NPR station KCBX at 89.5 FM and 90.9 FM. The California Lutheran University operated NPR station KCLU (102.3 FM, 1340 AM) based in Thousand Oaks in Ventura County also serves Santa Barbara and has reporters covering the city. The only non-commercial radio station based in Santa Barbara is KCSB-FM (91.9 FM) owned the University of California, Santa Barbara which uses it as part of its educational mission.

Parks[edit]

The central meadow region of the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden.

Santa Barbara has many parks, ranging from small spaces within the urban environment to large, semi-wilderness areas that remain within the city limits. Some notable parks within the city limits are as follows:

Some notable parks and open spaces just outside of the city limits include:

Education[edit]

Colleges and universities[edit]

University of California, Santa Barbara. It is located to the west of the city and is a major contributor to the city and its demographic makeup.

Santa Barbara and the immediately adjacent area is home to several colleges and universities:

Research university[edit]

Liberal arts colleges[edit]

Community college[edit]

Trade schools[edit]

Conservatory[edit]

Non-research graduate schools[edit]

High schools[edit]

Secondary and Primary School students go to the Santa Barbara and Hope district schools. There is also a variety of private schools in the area. The following schools are on the south coast of Santa Barbara County, including the cities of Santa Barbara, Goleta, Carpinteria, and contiguous unincorporated areas.

Junior high/middle schools[edit]

Elementary schools[edit]

Private schools[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Santa Barbara is bisected by U.S. Route 101, an automotive transportation corridor that links the city to the rest of the Central Coast region, San Francisco to the north, and Los Angeles to the south. Santa Barbara Municipal Airport offers commercial air service. Surf Air flies four flights daily, two to San Carlos in the Silicon Valley, and two to Burbank, California. Amtrak offers rail service through the Coast Starlight and Pacific Surfliner trains at the train station on State Street. The Santa Barbara Metropolitan Transit District (MTD) provides local bus service across the city, and Greyhound bus stations are located downtown. Electric shuttles operated by MTD ferry tourists and shoppers up and down lower State Street and to the wharf. Santa Barbara has an extensive network of bike trails and other resources for cyclists, and the League of American Bicyclists recognizes Santa Barbara as a Silver Level city. Ventura Intercity Service Transit Authority (VISTA) bus service offers connections south to Ventura and west to Goleta. The Clean Air Express bus offers connections to Lompoc and Santa Maria. Santa Barbara Airbus offers service to LAX from Santa Barbara and Goleta. In addition, Santa Barbara Car Free promotes visiting and exploring the area without use of a car.

Another popular car-free transportation method in Santa Barbara is bicycling. Often chosen as a winter training location for professional cycling teams and snowbirds alike, Santa Barbara has many great cycling routes and several notable climbs, including Gibraltar Road and Old San Marcos/Painted Cave. A bike path and route also connects the University of California, Santa Barbara to the downtown area, passing through Goleta and Hope Ranch along the way. Bike rentals are a great way for tourists to view Santa Barbara and the surrounding area, with resource website "Best Bike Rentals and Routes" offering links to all the major rental companies in the area.

Sister cities[edit]

CityCountryYear relations established
Palma Spain1972
Dingle Ireland2003
Puerto Vallarta Mexico1972
San Juan Philippines2000
Toba City Japan1966
Weihai People's Republic of China1993
Kotor Montenegro2013

In popular culture[edit]

The Loud family, subjects of the very first "reality TV" series, PBS's An American Family, called Santa Barbara home since the early 1960s (moving there from Eugene, Oregon) and throughout the series, all the family members save for Lance (who lived in New York City at the time) were filmed going about their daily lives in Santa Barbara. Bill's foundry supply company was headquartered in downtown Santa Barbara.

In the ABC television series Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, the fictional privately owned nuclear-powered submarine Seaview was based at the equally fictional Nelson Institute of Marine Research located in Santa Barbara.

Several scenes in the 1966 film Batman, starring Adam West and Burt Ward, were filmed on Stearns Wharf.

The final scene of the 1967 film The Graduate is set in Santa Barbara, but the final scene was filmed in Calabasas.

The 1980s soap opera Santa Barbara is set within its namesake city.

Santa Teresa is a fictional version of Santa Barbara used in the mystery novels of Ross Macdonald and Sue Grafton.

The 1999 film My Favorite Martian was filmed on location in Santa Barbara. While the opening shot shows fictional TV station KGSC Channel 10, KEYT Channel 3 was actually used for the filming location.

Several city vistas were used to represent Sunnydale in Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

The USA Network television show Psych features a fake psychic working for the Santa Barbara Police Department. The show, however, is not filmed on location. It is filmed in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Hollywood couples including Fergie and Josh Duhamel, Travis Barker and Shanna Moakler, Jennie Garth and Peter Facinelli and Martin Sheen's daughter, Casandra Estevez all celebrated their weddings at the Bacara Resort in Goleta, adjacent to Santa Barbara.

Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives episodes Scratch Made Classics and Global Traditions on the Food Network each have a segment at restaurants in Santa Barbara.

The television show $40 a Day showed an episode in Santa Barbara.

The 2009 film It's Complicated is set in Santa Barbara.

Santa Barbara is the hometown of Grammy nominated popstar, Katy Perry who filmed her music video "Teenage Dream" in the city.

The song "Hannah Hunt" by Vampire Weekend refers to Santa Barbara as a place where the namesake character had cried.

Pictures and Video of Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, looking towards the harbor from the top of the County Courthouse, showing the distinctive red-tiled roofs 
The first Motel 6, in Santa Barbara 
A view of Santa Barbara from the Santa Ynez Mountain Range 
Sunrise, looking across the Pacific from the hills of Santa Barbara, toward the Santa Monica Mountains
A view of a Santa Barbara sunset looking over the ocean. 
Santa Barbara, looking east from above Santa Barbara City College 
Santa Barbara, looking west-northwest from the County Courthouse tower, with Mission Santa Barbara and San Marcos Pass in the distance 
Video of the Mission in Santa Barbara (1 minute, 29 sec.) 
Surfers in Santa Barbara 

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "U.S. Census". Retrieved 2012-05-20. 
  2. ^ http://www.santabarbaraca.gov/Business/Demographic/Statistics/
  3. ^ Horowitz, Joy. "New York Times article on Santa Barbara". Travel.nytimes.com. Retrieved 2012-05-20. 
  4. ^ "Santa Maria grows 28.6%". Santa Maria Times. 2011-03-09. Retrieved 2012-05-20. 
  5. ^ United States Census 2010
  6. ^ Santa Barbara economic statistics, 2005[dead link]
  7. ^ Radic, Theo (2002). "Syukhtun". Syukhtun Editions. Retrieved 2013-05-07. 
  8. ^ Gudde, Erwin G. (1969). California Place Names. Berkeley: UC Press. p. 294. 
  9. ^ Tompkins, 1975, p. 11
  10. ^ Baker, Gayle, Santa Barbara HarborTown Histories Publishers, Santa Barbara, CA, 2003, ISBN 978-0-9710984-1-1 (print) 978-0-9879038-1-5 (e-book) p. 12-13
  11. ^ "Los Angeles Times article on 1812 tsunami" (PDF). Retrieved 2012-05-20. 
  12. ^ Tompkins, 1975, p. 13-14
  13. ^ Tompkins, 1983, p. 113
  14. ^ Baker, p. 34-35
  15. ^ Baker, p. 39
  16. ^ Baker, pp. 56-59, 66
  17. ^ Baker, p. 63
  18. ^ Tompkins, 1976, p. 258
  19. ^ Baker, p. 72
  20. ^ Birchard, p. 49
  21. ^ U.S. Bureau of Reclamation: page on the Lake Cachuma project[dead link]
  22. ^ a b Baker, pp. 88-89
  23. ^ Tompkins, 1975, p. 115
  24. ^ Baker, pp. 89-91
  25. ^ Rabin, Jeffrey L.; Kelley, Daryl (1999-04-13). "Slow Growth Movement | `Slow Growth' Has Come at a Cost in Santa Barbara". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2012-05-20. 
  26. ^ "City of Santa Barbara: Historical Santa Barbara Area Fires". June 2011. Retrieved 2012-07-31. 
  27. ^ "History of the Santa Barbara County Fire Department". Retrieved 2012-07-31. 
  28. ^ Santa Barbara tourism website, showing "The American Riviera" trademark (accessed February 2014)
  29. ^ "Santa Barbara (COOP)". Wrcc.dri.edu. Retrieved 2012-05-20. 
  30. ^ http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?ca7902
  31. ^ http://www.dof.ca.gov/research/demographic/state_census_data_center/historical_census_1850-2010/view.php
  32. ^ "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - Santa Barbara city". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2014. 
  33. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  34. ^ City of Santa Barbara CAFR[dead link]
  35. ^ Easton, Robert Olney (1972). Black tide: the Santa Barbara oil spill and its consequences. New York, New York: Delacorte Press. pp. 89–90. 
  36. ^ Baker, p. 91
  37. ^ "Our Lady of Sorrows Church". Official Website. Retrieved 2014-03-30. 
  38. ^ "History - Santa Barbara Summer Solstice Celebration". Solsticeparade.com. Retrieved 2012-05-20. 
  39. ^ "Restaurant Guide". Santabarbara.com. Retrieved 2012-05-20. 
  40. ^ "Verified Audit (page 2 in online kit)" (PDF). Retrieved 2012-05-20. 
  41. ^ http://www.pacbiztimes.com/
  42. ^ http://www.sblife.com
  43. ^ http://www.shapeofvoice.com
  44. ^ http://www.sbitv.com

References[edit]

External links[edit]