Saline County, Missouri

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Saline County, Missouri
Marshall-mo-ch.jpg
Saline County Courthouse in Marshall
Map of Missouri highlighting Saline County
Location in the state of Missouri
Map of the United States highlighting Missouri
Missouri's location in the U.S.
FoundedNovember 25, 1820
Named forThe salt springs in the region
SeatMarshall
Largest cityMarshall
Area
 • Total764.59 sq mi (1,980 km2)
 • Land755.55 sq mi (1,957 km2)
 • Water9.04 sq mi (23 km2), 1.18%
Population
 • (2010)23,370
 • Density31/sq mi (12/km²)
Congressional district5th
Time zoneCentral: UTC-6/-5
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Saline County, Missouri
Marshall-mo-ch.jpg
Saline County Courthouse in Marshall
Map of Missouri highlighting Saline County
Location in the state of Missouri
Map of the United States highlighting Missouri
Missouri's location in the U.S.
FoundedNovember 25, 1820
Named forThe salt springs in the region
SeatMarshall
Largest cityMarshall
Area
 • Total764.59 sq mi (1,980 km2)
 • Land755.55 sq mi (1,957 km2)
 • Water9.04 sq mi (23 km2), 1.18%
Population
 • (2010)23,370
 • Density31/sq mi (12/km²)
Congressional district5th
Time zoneCentral: UTC-6/-5

Saline County is a county located in west central Missouri. As of the 2010 census, the population was 23,370.[1] Its county seat is Marshall.[2] The county was established November 25, 1820, and named for the region's salt springs.

Saline County comprises the Marshall, MO Micropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Saline County was formed by European-American settlers on November 25, 1820, and was named from the salinity of the springs found in the region.[3] Historically Saline County was occupied for thousands of years by succeeding cultures of Missouri Native Americans. They were relocated to reservations following European-American settlement.

Saline County was settled primarily by migrants from the Upper Southern states of Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. They quickly started cultivating crops similar to those in Middle Tennessee and Kentucky: hemp and tobacco. The counties settled by southerners were known as "Little Dixie." By the time of the Civil War, one-third of the county population was African American, most of whom were enslaved laborers on major plantations, particularly for labor-intensive tobacco cultivation.

Geography[edit]

According to the 2000 U.S. Census, the county has a total area of 764.59 square miles (1,980.3 km2), of which 755.55 square miles (1,956.9 km2) (or 98.82%) is land and 9.04 square miles (23.4 km2) (or 1.18%) is water.[4]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

National protected area[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
18302,873
18405,25883.0%
18508,84368.2%
186014,69966.2%
187021,67247.4%
188029,91138.0%
189033,76212.9%
190033,703−0.2%
191029,448−12.6%
192028,817−2.1%
193030,5986.2%
194029,416−3.9%
195026,694−9.3%
196025,148−5.8%
197024,633−2.0%
198024,9191.2%
199023,523−5.6%
200023,7561.0%
201023,370−1.6%
Est. 201223,339−0.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
2012 Estimate[1]

At the 2000 census[6], there were 23,756 people, 9,015 households and 6,013 families residing in the county. The population density was 31 per square mile (12/km²). There were 10,019 housing units at an average density of 13 per square mile (5/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 90.03% White, 5.39% Black or African American, 0.31% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 0.21% Pacific Islander, 2.09% from other races, and 1.62% from two or more races. Approximately 4.42% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 28.7% were of German, 18.2% American, 9.8% English and 9.3% Irish ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 9,015 households of which 30.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.90% were married couples living together, 10.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.30% were non-families. 28.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.97.

In Age distribution was 24.30% under the age of 18, 12.00% from 18 to 24, 25.20% from 25 to 44, 22.30% from 45 to 64, and 16.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 96.10 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.70 males.

The median household income was $32,743, and the median family income was $39,234. Males had a median income of $27,180 versus $19,431 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,132. About 10.50% of families and 13.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.90% of those under age 18 and 8.60% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns[edit]

Unincorporated areas:

Education[edit]

Public Schools[edit]

Private Schools[edit]

Post Secondary[edit]

Politics[edit]

Local[edit]

The Democratic Party predominantly controls politics at the local level in Saline County. Democrats hold all but four of the elected positions in the county.

Saline County, Missouri
Elected countywide officials
AssessorMargaret PondDemocratic
Circuit ClerkSharon D. CrawfordDemocratic
County ClerkDebbie RussellDemocratic
CollectorGrace E. MilesDemocratic
Commissioner
(Presiding)
Tom StallingsRepublican
Commissioner
(District 1)
Charles GuthrieDemocratic
Commissioner
(District 2)
Monte FennerDemocratic
CoronerWilliam “Willie” HarlowDemocratic
Prosecuting AttorneyDonald G. StoufferDemocratic
Public AdministratorPaula J. BarrDemocratic
RecorderJamie NicholsDemocratic
SheriffWally GeorgeDemocratic
SurveyorRobert RobinsonIndependent
TreasurerMarty SmithRepublican

State[edit]

Past Gubernatorial Elections Results
YearRepublicanDemocraticThird Parties
200832.80% 3,19556.87% 5,54010.34% 1,007
200447.46% 4,69151.30% 5,0711.24% 123
200042.23% 3,94556.14% 5,2451.63% 152
199626.11% 2,31571.45% 6,3342.44% 216

Saline County is divided into two legislative districts in the Missouri House of Representatives with split representation.

Missouri House of Representatives – District 26 – Saline County (2010)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
DemocraticJoe Aull5,326100.00
Missouri House of Representatives – District 118 – Saline County (2010)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanStanley Cox51360.50
DemocraticRaymond F. Kinney31036.56
ConstitutionCurtis Shipman252.95

All of Saline County is a part of Missouri’s 21st District in the Missouri Senate and is currently represented by Bill Stouffer (R-Napton).

Missouri Senate - District 21 – Saline County (2008)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanBill Stouffer6,18664.28
DemocraticJoe Sadeghi3,43735.72

Federal[edit]

All of Saline County is included in Missouri’s 4th Congressional District and is currently represented by Vicky Hartzler (R-Harrisonville) in the U.S. House of Representatives.

U.S. House of Representatives – Missouri’s 4th Congressional District – Saline County (2010)
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
DemocraticIke Skelton4,23160.94
RepublicanVicky Hartzler2,46135.45
LibertarianJason Michael Braun1682.42
ConstitutionGreg Cowan831.20

Political Culture[edit]

Past Presidential Elections Results
YearRepublicanDemocraticThird Parties
200850.39% 4,96247.85% 4,7121.76% 174
200454.22% 5,38945.06% 4,4790.71% 71
200048.87% 4,57249.01% 4,5852.12% 198
199633.10% 2,93153.82 4,76513.08% 1,158

Missouri Presidential Preference Primary (2008)[edit]

Saline County, Missouri
2008 Republican primary in Missouri
John McCain617 (38.30%)
Mike Huckabee518 (32.15%)
Mitt Romney392 (24.33%)
Ron Paul51 (3.17%)
Saline County, Missouri
2008 Democratic primary in Missouri
Hillary Rodham Clinton1,787 (57.46%)
Barack Obama1,177 (37.85%)
John Edwards (withdrawn)111 (3.57%)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 14, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1918). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. p. 361. 
  4. ^ "Census 2010 Gazetteer Files". Retrieved July 2, 2013. 
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved September 14, 2013. 
  6. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°08′N 93°12′W / 39.14°N 93.20°W / 39.14; -93.20