Saddle joint

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Saddle joint
Gelenke Zeichnung01.jpg
1: Ball and socket joint; 2: Condyloid joint (Ellipsoid); 3: Saddle joint; 4 Hinge joint; 5: Pivot joint;
Gray335.png
Ligaments of wrist. Posterior view.
Latinarticulatio sellaris
Gray'sp.286
Anatomical terminology
 
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Saddle joint
Gelenke Zeichnung01.jpg
1: Ball and socket joint; 2: Condyloid joint (Ellipsoid); 3: Saddle joint; 4 Hinge joint; 5: Pivot joint;
Gray335.png
Ligaments of wrist. Posterior view.
Latinarticulatio sellaris
Gray'sp.286
Anatomical terminology

In a saddle joint (sellar joint, articulation by reciprocal reception) the opposing surfaces are reciprocally concave-convex.

Movements[edit]

The movements are as same as in the condyloid joint; that is to say, flexion, extension, adduction, abduction, and circumduction are allowed; but no axial rotation. Saddle joints are said to be biaxial, allowing movement in the sagittal and frontal planes.

Examples[edit]

The best example of saddle joints are first carpo metacarpal joints (Articulationes carpometacarpeae), joints between femur and patella, calcaneocuboid joints.

External links[edit]

This article incorporates text from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy.