San Francisco Police Department

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San Francisco Police Department
AbbreviationSFPD
CA - San Francisco Police.png
The current patch of the San Francisco Police Department.
Logo of the San Francisco Police Department.png
Vehicle Door Decal San Francisco Police Department
SanFranciscoPoliceBadge.png
The current badge of the San Francisco Police Department.
Seal of the San Francisco Police Department.png
Commerative Decal of the San Francisco Police Department
MottoOro en paz, fierro en guerra
Gold in peace, iron in war
Agency overview
Formed1849
Legal personalityGovernmental: Government agency
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdiction*State of California, USA
California county map (San Francisco County highlighted).svg
Jurisdiction of the San Francisco Police Department,
Legal jurisdictionSan Francisco, California
Governing bodySan Francisco Police Commission
General nature
Operational structure
Overviewed by BoardSan Francisco Police Commission
HeadquartersSan Francisco Hall of Justice
850 Bryant St San Francisco, CA 94103
Officers2,095[1]
Patrol Specials30+
Commissioners responsible
  • Thomas Mazzucco, President
  • L. Julius Turman, Vice President
  • Dr. Joe Marshall
  • Angela Chan
  • Carol Kingsley
  • Suzy Loftus
Agency executiveGreg Suhr, Chief of Police
Bureaus
Divisions
Facilities
Stations10
Airbases1
Patrol cars850+
Boats2
Planes2+
Dogs15+
Website
www.SF-Police.org
Footnotes
* Divisional agency: Division of the country, over which the agency has usual operational jurisdiction.
 
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San Francisco Police Department
AbbreviationSFPD
CA - San Francisco Police.png
The current patch of the San Francisco Police Department.
Logo of the San Francisco Police Department.png
Vehicle Door Decal San Francisco Police Department
SanFranciscoPoliceBadge.png
The current badge of the San Francisco Police Department.
Seal of the San Francisco Police Department.png
Commerative Decal of the San Francisco Police Department
MottoOro en paz, fierro en guerra
Gold in peace, iron in war
Agency overview
Formed1849
Legal personalityGovernmental: Government agency
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdiction*State of California, USA
California county map (San Francisco County highlighted).svg
Jurisdiction of the San Francisco Police Department,
Legal jurisdictionSan Francisco, California
Governing bodySan Francisco Police Commission
General nature
Operational structure
Overviewed by BoardSan Francisco Police Commission
HeadquartersSan Francisco Hall of Justice
850 Bryant St San Francisco, CA 94103
Officers2,095[1]
Patrol Specials30+
Commissioners responsible
  • Thomas Mazzucco, President
  • L. Julius Turman, Vice President
  • Dr. Joe Marshall
  • Angela Chan
  • Carol Kingsley
  • Suzy Loftus
Agency executiveGreg Suhr, Chief of Police
Bureaus
Divisions
Facilities
Stations10
Airbases1
Patrol cars850+
Boats2
Planes2+
Dogs15+
Website
www.SF-Police.org
Footnotes
* Divisional agency: Division of the country, over which the agency has usual operational jurisdiction.

The San Francisco Police Department (SFPD), also known as the San Francisco Department of Police, is the police department of the City and County of San Francisco, California. The department's motto is the same as that of the city and county: Oro en paz, fierro en guerra, archaic Spanish for Gold in peace, iron in war.

The SFPD should not be confused with the San Francisco Sheriff's Department, which is another law enforcement agency within San Francisco. The SFPD (along with the San Francisco Fire Department and the San Francisco Sheriff's Department) serves an estimated population of 1.2 million, including the daytime-commuter population, and the thousands of other tourists and visitors, in the second most densely populated large city in North America. It is the 11th largest police department in the United States.[2]

History[edit]

A 1932 march in front of San Francisco City Hall

The SFPD began operations on August 13, 1849 during the Gold Rush under the command of Captain Malachi Fallon. At the time, Chief Fallon had a force of one deputy captain, three sergeants and thirty officers.[3]

In 1851, Albert Bernard de Russailh wrote about the nascent San Francisco police force:[4]

As for the police, I have only one thing to say. The police force is largely made up of ex-bandits, and naturally the members are interested above all in saving their old friends from punishment. Policemen here are quite as much to be feared as the robbers; if they know you have money, they will be the first to knock you on the head. You pay them well to watch over your house, and they set it on fire. In short, I think that all the people concerned with justice or the police are in league with the criminals. The city is in a hopeless chaos, and many years must pass before order can be established. In a country where so many races are mingled, a severe and inflexible justice is desirable, which would govern with an iron hand.

On October 28, 1853, the Board of Aldermen passed Ordinance No. 466, which provided for the reorganization of the police department. Sections one and two provided as follows:

The People of the City of San Francisco do ordain as follows:

Sec. 1. The Police Department of the City of San Francisco, shall be composed of a day and night police, consisting of 56 men (including a Captain and assistant Captain), each to be recommended by at least ten tax-paying citizens.

Sec. 2. There shall be one Captain and one assistant Captain of Police, who shall be elected in joint convention of the Board of Aldermen and assistant Aldermen. The remainder of the force, viz., 54 men, shall be appointed as follows: By the Mayor, 2; by the City Marshal, 2; by the City Recorder, 2; and by the Aldermen and assistant Aldermen, 3 each.

In July 1856, the "Consolidation Act" went into effect. This act abolished the office of City Marshal and created in its stead the office of Chief of Police. The first Chief of Police elected in 1856 was James F. Curtis a former member of the San Francisco Committee of Vigilance.

In 1997, the San Francisco International Airport Police merged with SFPD, becoming the SFPD Airport Bureau.[5]

The SFPD currently has over 2000 sworn officers.[2]

The SFPD have been known to be some of the toughest on crime cops on the West Coast, but lenient for small offenses, and are known as an "East Coast" Department on the West Coast in regards to customs and history.[who?] They also have adapted and are known for their protest and riot control history, dating back to the 1934 West Coast waterfront strike riots, their beatings of persons involved in segregation protests in the 1950s, protests of the HUAC hearings at City Hall, and military style sweeps of the Haight-Ashbury district in the late 1960s.[citation needed] and marches against US Foreign Policy in the financial district. There have been few unjustified shootings and use-of-force cases against the department compared to other large cities.

The SFPD is known for being one of the pioneering forces for modern law enforcement, beginning in the early 1900s.

As of September 8, 2011, ground was broken for San Francisco's new Public Safety Building (PSB) down in Mission Bay. A replacement facility for the San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) Headquarters and Southern District Police Station currently located at 850 Bryant, the PSB will also contain a fire station to serve the burgeoning neighborhood.

Organization[edit]

Modern SFPD cruiser (regular)

The head of the SFPD is the Chief of Police. The current Chief is Greg Suhr. He was chosen by Mayor Ed Lee to fill the post left by Chief George Gascon, who resigned on January 9, 2011 to accept an appointment as San Francisco District Attorney by Mayor Gavin Newsom. The San Francisco DA's position had become vacant after then-District Attorney Kamala Harris barely won her bid in November 2010 to become California's Attorney General.

The Chief works with six deputy chiefs directing the four bureaus: Administration, Airport, Field Operations, and Investigations, as well as the Municipal Transportation Authority, and the Public Utilities Commission. With the exception of the bureau of Investigations, three commanders are assigned to each bureau to assist the deputy chiefs.

Vehicles

The SFPD has several types of vehicles in use, among them: The Ford Crown Victoria, Dodge Magnum, Chevrolet Tahoe, and more recently the 2013 Ford Taurus and 2013 Ford Explorer.

Administration Bureau[edit]

The Administration Bureau is responsible for providing support to other bureaus of SFPD, as well as other city agencies. The bureau is split into seven units or divisions:

A SFPD squad transportation bus.

Airport Bureau[edit]

The Airport Bureau of the San Francisco Police Department was established on July 1, 1997, as the successor to the San Francisco International Airport Police.[6] The Airport Police department was closed after a local referendum. The Airport Bureau is responsible for the security and safety of San Francisco International Airport. Besides providing basic police services, this bureau also oversees the airport's Transportation Security Administration (TSA) security plans and plays a critical role in the airport's emergency response capabilities.[citation needed]

Field Operations Bureau[edit]

The Field Operations Bureau (FOB) is responsible for the reduction of crime around the city. The bureau is split into several different units:

Investigations Bureau[edit]

Unofficial (NOT worn) Crime Scene Unit patch

The Investigations Bureau is split into five divisions:

Crime Prevention Company[edit]

The Crime Prevention Company, known as the (TAC) Unit, is the operator in charge of the various specialty units of the SFPD. This includes the SFPD SWAT teams, the SFPD Honda-Bike Unit, Anti-Gang Units, and special security details for celebrities, politicians, and foreign dignitaries. It also includes the on-call Police dog K-9 Units. The officers that fall under this unit, or company, have specialized training and roles in addition to being regular Patrol Officers.

Equipment[edit]

The standard issue side arm issued by the SFPD is the SIG Sauer P226&SIG Sauer P229 chambered in .40 S&W.[7] After completing probation, an officer may qualify for a weapon of his/her choice. Officers also carry batons, pepper spray, a radio, and handcuffs.

Ranking structure[edit]

TitleInsignia
Chief
4 Gold Stars.svg
Assistant Chief
3 Gold Stars.svg
Deputy Chief
2 Gold Stars.svg
Commander
1 Gold Star.svg
Captain
Captain insignia gold.svg
Lieutenant
US-O1 insignia.svg
Sergeant/Inspector
NYPD Sergeant Stripes.svg
Officer
SanFranciscoPoliceBadge.png

The SFPD has supplemental levels for ranks up to Captain, depending on P.O.S.T. certification. Example; Q-2, Q-3 or Q-4 Police Officer for Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Peace Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) certification. The department is also among the few departments old enough to retain the rank of "Inspector" rather than the newer title of Detective or Investigator. Inspectors do not use chevrons to identify their rank—instead they wear a gold star badge similar to lieutenants and above. Inspectors were initially the equivalent of a Lieutenant rank and pay, but are now equivalent to a Sergeant rank and pay. Tenured officers will have blue and gold hash-marks on the lower left sleeve of their Class A or B long-sleeved shirts. Each mark represents five years of service.

Patrol Specials[edit]

SFPD Patrol Special Patch, with rocker and silver border rather than gold.

San Francisco also has a unique off-shoot known as the San Francisco Patrol Special police. These are privately funded, armed security police who work the beat as paid for by local businesses. They are not part of the SFPD however, they are regulated by the San Francisco Police Commission. Formed in 1847, a full two years before the official Police Department[8] by Official City Charter. The patrol specials are one of only few security police of their kind in the nation.

They are un-affectionately known as "door-shakers" (as are security guards) for it was a common practice for them to walk up and down a beat making sure the doors and windows of local business were locked and closed shut. They wear the six-pointed Star of David badge, rather than the traditional seven-pointed star of the SFPD.

Recently the San Francisco Patrol Specials have been under fire for abuse of force and activities "amounting to the job of a peace officer but not fully authorized to do such". In January 2009 they were ordered to change their uniforms to look more like security or civilian patrol officers, and less like actual San Francisco Police officers. Because of this, the SFPD recently created a web page that deals with what exactly the Patrol Specials do.[9] The webpage also makes the prime distinctions between the Patrol Special and Police Officer, as it says:

A Patrol Special Officer’s uniform is not the same as a San Francisco Police Officer’s uniform. The Patrol Special Officers are required to wear light blue shirts with navy blue pants. The pants must have a light blue ¼” stripe along the outer most pant leg seam. Patrol Special Officers are not allowed to wear dark navy blue shirts. This uniform is purchased privately by the Patrol Special Officer and is not paid for by any public funds.

Patrol Special Officers are required to wear a silver-toned 6-point star with the words “San Francisco Patrol Special Police” stamped on the facing. No other style or shaped badge is authorized. All San Francisco Police Officers are issued a 7-point star as their official badge.

San Francisco Police Reserve Officers[edit]

SFPD Reserve Officers patch

The San Francisco Police Reserve Officer Unit is composed of individuals who wish to provide community service and give back to the city they live or work in. These officers understand the need for quality policing and community involvement, but cannot make the full commitment on becoming a full-time police officer.

A San Francisco Police Reserve Officer is a POST (Police Officer Standards and Training)- certified peace officer who volunteers his or her time. A Reserve Officer is classified as a Q-0 and has the same duties and authority as a full-time paid Police Officer while on-duty. Officers patrol in vehicles, on bikes, on foot, and in some cases on marine craft. Reserve officers must meet the same stringent and comprehensive POST standards and training as regular full-time police officers. Most San Francisco Police Reserve Officers are Level 1 Reserve Officers, which is the highest level that is recognized by the State of California. The SFPD does accept Level 2 or Level 3 Reserve Officers, but based upon their respective levels which determine how a Reserve Officer is deployed.

Reserve Officers are responsible for serving a minimum of 24 volunteer hours per month to retain peace officers status, although there are Reserve Officers who routinely contribute two to three times that amount.

Reserve Officers are involved in many areas of police work. Although most reserve officers actively participate in patrol, others work for such details as Muni, the Fugitive Recovery Enforcement Team, Vice, juvenile, emergency operations, DUI check-points, transporting prisoners, Command Van duty, and fixed posts at special events like 49er Football games and Sigmund Stern Grove performances.

Reserves are now organized like a company, with a complement of 40 Reserve Officers divided into three squads, each with a designated squad sergeant. For special events like New Year's Eve, Halloween night, and other city-wide events, Reserves are assigned as a squad.

Before Reserve candidates are considered, they must meet the same eligibility criteria as a Q-2 Police Officer Recruit. Furthermore, each candidate must completed the required training prior to being appointed as a Reserve Police Officer. Once appointed, that officer must attend Continuing Professional Training, which is consistent with the requirements of regular full-time Officers every two years. There is also a 400-hour Field Training Program that Level 1 Reserves Officers must complete with a FTO officer. Reserve officers are held to the same performance standards as a full-time Police Officer and serve at the pleasure of the Chief of Police.[citation needed]

SWAT[edit]

Regular SFPD shoulder patch in subdued colors for SWAT work

San Francisco has been known for their elite SWAT team, composed of volunteer and selected officers from the entire agency. Most training is done in-house, with occasional and required training by FBI instructors, other Federal Agencies and private Military instruction. The SWAT division participates in planned and coordinated raids with agencies such as the FBI, DEA, and the ATF. As of recently (2007) it is mandatory that SWAT team members are together, sometimes during routine patrol, and can be seen among the streets of San Francisco in BDU and traveling in a marked SUV, to ensure a quick and timely response to calls. They were under political fire in the highly publicized 1998 Western Addition Raid, in which more than 90 SFPD SWAT and Federal Agents raided a Western Addition housing project.[10] The SWAT team also executes high-risk warrants in the City and County of San Francisco. They are also among one of the oldest serving agencies doing city crime suppression (the act of saturating high-crime areas with large amounts of officers and police presence-a more proactive approach) along with LAPD SWAT and NYPD Emergency Service Units.[11]

Housing Authority Police[edit]

The San Francisco Housing Authority Police was formed as an off-shoot of the department in 1938 to patrol the various housing projects of the city.[12] In the 1990s they were completely absorbed back into the main Police Department.

C.R.U.S.H.[edit]

In the mid-1990s, San Francisco experienced the explosion of drug-related homicides,[13] which escalated to approximately 40 murders. Then-Chief Fred Lau sought the expertise of his veteran homicide Inspectors, Napoleon Hendrix (now deceased) and Prentice "Earl" Sanders (later Chief of Police), to put together a "top notch" task force to solve and suppress the murders and investigate violent illegal narcotics cell groups and other violent crimes. Inspector Bob McMillan, Officer Nash Balinton and his partner Officer Paul Lozada,[14] Officer Mike Bolte, Officer Michael Philpott, and Sergeants John Monroe, Maurice Edwards and Kervin Silas, were personally selected to the unit by the Inspectors.

Motor Division[edit]

San Francisco Police Division solo officers on the Harley-Davidson Road King motorcycles at Treasure Island

The SFPD was one of the founding departments in the field of utilizing Police motorcycles (along with their counterparts across the bay in Berkeley). The unit was founded in 1909, and has grown ever since. They are officially under the command of the SFPD Traffic Division. They participate in many duties such as traffic-enforcement, patrol, riot control, and special events and escorts. It is the only fully functional department that utilizes the entire traffic fleet for escorts in the nation. No other metropolitan city utilizes all its motor bikes for escorts but SFPD.

The entire 85-man unit is based at the Hall of Justice at 850 Bryant Street. Unlike most cities, they patrol as solo officers (hence the name SOLOS). They can frequently be seen throughout the city. The bulk of the unit is composed of Harley-Davidson Road King motorcycles. There is a separate division that is composed of Suzuki DR-Z400S dual-sport motorcycles (which is under the command of the Tactical Unit and not the same as Traffic), for city patrol and patrol in and around the area of Golden Gate Park. Otherwise, every one of the 10 main police stations in the city have 2 motorcycles under their command, used for patrol around their districts exclusively.

Aero Division[edit]

The SFPD "Aero" Squadron was at its peak in the mid-1970s, with helicopter and small plane flights rivaling the amount of frequency of the Los Angeles Police Department. After several accidents (one of which a helicopter crashed in Lake Merced, killing Officer Charles Logasa in 1971) and complaints about the "Eye in the Sky" program, the unit was disbanded. The helicopter unit was featured prominently in the first Dirty Harry film, identifying a sniper on a roof top before committing a murder. The unit was reactivated in the late-1990s, but after another fatal crash (which killed two SFPD officers, Kirk Bradley Brookbush and James Francis Dougherty) the Aero unit was put into an "inactive" status indefinitely. In times where it needs air support, the SFPD contacts the California Highway Patrol who has a Napa air base.

Police Academy[edit]

The original San Francisco Police Academy was built in 1895 and was located on the West End adjacent to Golden Gate Park. The building, no longer in use, had the facilities to accommodate 25 trainees. In the 1960s, the building now used as the San Francisco Police Academy Complex was built originally as Diamond Heights Elementary School located at 350 Amber Drive, just behind the Diamond Height's Safeway. The building was built in the 1960s hugging the Diamond Heights/Glen Park Canyon. Almost immediately upon completion, the property was determined to be unsafe and sliding into the canyon. The school was closed for one year, shored up and reopened. It was closed as a public school in the 1980s. Subsequently, the building is used by the SFPD for training. It is surrounded by a heavily wooded forest area and is near a shopping mall and apartment complex. As of recently (2008), there are three academy classes in session annually, with individual classes taking place for 31 to 32 weeks, year round. Pier 94 is also used for vehicle training exercises and mock police car chases, and Lake Merced is the location of the Academy's firing range. With a boom in retirees in the coming years, a projected 700+ officers will be hired within the next 5–10 years, meaning full academy classes for some time. Lateral officers are currently being hired, and are being hired on an on-going basis.[15]

Hall of Justice[edit]

The San Francisco Thomas J. Cahill Hall of Justice at 850 Bryant Street houses a number of criminal courts, jail facilities, SFPD Headqaurters, investigative and support units, as well as "Southern Station". The Headquarters of the San Francisco Sheriff's Department in housed in an adjacent building.

Uniform[edit]

3 SFPD officers in uniform.

In popular media[edit]

The SFPD has been portrayed in films such as The Sniper, Freebie and the Bean, The Laughing Policeman (film), Bullitt, the Dirty Harry film series, 48 Hrs., A View to a Kill, Metro, Rush Hour, and Zodiac, as well as television series such as The Lineup, Ironside, The Streets of San Francisco, McMillan & Wife, Nash Bridges, The Division, Killer Instinct, The Evidence, and Monk. The Dirty Harry film series is known for shaping the popular view of the department, with a hard-nosed stance on crime and often using "cowboy" tactics (shoot first, stakeouts, and preemptive raids).

In the days of old-time radio, there were a number of drama series built around the activities of the SFPD. Carlton E. Morse created four different shows based on SFPD files for NBC's Pacific Coast Network, Chinatown Squad, Barbary Coast Nights, Killed in Action, and To the Best of Their Ability.

The SFPD has also had a strong presence in novels and short stories. Sidney Herschel Small wrote a series of thirty stories that appeared in Detective Fiction Weekly between 1931 and 1936 featuring Sergeant Jimmy Wentworth, the head of the Chinatown Squad, whose adventures were presumably based, if loosely, on the activities of Jack Manion, the real-life commander of SFPD's Chinatown detail. In the early 1960s, Breni James wrote two novels about Sergeant Gun Mattson, uniformed patrol supervisor at the Ingleside District Station, The Night of the Kill (1961), which was an Edgar nominee for Best First Novel, and The Shakeup (1964). Ernest K. Gann's 1963 novel, Of Good and Evil, tells the story of one busy day in the professional life of San Francisco's police chief, Colin Hill, a character apparently modeled on SFPD's real-life chief at that time, Thomas J. Cahill, to whom the book is dedicated. More recently, Collin Wilcox wrote a long series series featuring Lieutenant Frank Hastings of SFPD's Homicide Detail. Laurie R. King won an Edgar for her first novel, A Grave Talent (1993), which introduced Homicide Inspector Kate Martinelli, who has gone on to headline such books as With Child (1997), an Edgar nominee, and The Art of Detection (2006), winner of the Lambda Award for Best Lesbian Mystery Novel. James Patterson's novels about Homicide Inspector Lindsay Boxer, introduced in 1st to Die (2001), have become best-sellers, and were the basis for the short-lived TV series Women's Murder Club. Former SFPD detective and current Bay Area private investigator Jerry Kenneally has written two novels featuring Homicide Inspector Jack Kordic, The Conductor (1996) and The Hunted (1999). After a trilogy of police novels set in other parts of the Bay Area, retired San Jose Police Chief Joseph McNamara wrote one novel, Code 211 Blue (1996), about a narcotics inspector who uncovers corruption within the SFPD. Another former cop, Robin Burcell, who spent twenty years in law enforcement, first as an officer in the Lodi Police, then later as a criminal investigator for the Sacramento County District Attorney's Office, wrote four novels featuring Homicide Inspector Kate Gillespie, the first of which, Every Move She Makes (1999), won the Barry for Best Paperback Original, and the third of which, Deadly Legacy (2003), won the Anthony in the same category.

Some San Francisco-set police novels have explored The City's rich history. With Siberia Comes a Chill (1990), by former Inyo County Deputy Sheriff Kirk Mitchell, features SFPD Homicide Inspector John Kost who, in April 1945, while conducting a murder investigation as the United Nations is meeting for the first time in San Francisco, finds himself pitted against an NKVD assassin. White Rabbit by David Daniels, set during 1967's Summer of Love, follows Homicide Inspector John Sparrow as he pursues a serial killer stalking the residents of San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury neighborhood.

Most main protagonists of the iOS novel Cause of Death are workers of the SFPD. In fact, a main protagonist of the game (Malachi "Mal" Fallon) has his name taken from that of Malachi Fallon of the real SFPD.

Controversies[edit]

SFPD officers at a protest in the Mission District

The SFPD has been frequently met with criticism, unavoidable due to problems of accountability and corruption that plagued the department early in its inception. In 1937, an investigation, referred to as the "Atherton Report"[16] by District Attorney Matthew Brady found that more than $1 million per year was being pocketed by officers from regular payoffs by prostitution, gambling and other criminal interests. It has also dealt with attacks such as the Preparedness Day Bombing in 1916 and the San Francisco Police Department Park Station bombing in the 1960s by leftist radicals.

Recent examples of controversy include police shootings, the reaction to Critical Mass bicycle rides and protests in the Financial District against U.S. foreign policy. Surprisingly the rate of complaints against officers and "excessive force" cases are lower relative to other big-city departments, such as the LAPD, the NYPD, or CPD. Nevertheless, the city retains one of the highest complaint rates; particularly when analyzed on a per-capita basis, factoring in the relatively small population of San Francisco compared to Los Angeles or New York. This could be attributed to several factors, including the dramatic increase of so-called "transient population", or those coming to visit the city (increasing the population to approximately 1.3 million), or the proactive nature of the Office of Citizen Complaints, or OCC. The OCC, created by San Francisco City Charter, has been known to solicit complaints from people contacted by police, and while the initial complaint volume appears high, the actual volume of sustained complaints against officers is very low for a department of its size.[citation needed]

Notable incidents and events include the Golden Dragon massacre, a deadly shooting between Chinese gang members in the city's Chinatown district, and the 101 California Street shootings in 1993.

The crime lab's reputation worsened after an employee stole cocaine.[17]

In 2011, the FBI opened an investigation into alleged police misconduct. Public Defender Jeff Adachi released video footage from security cameras that showed different cases of SFPD officers entering apartments without warrants, plain-clothed officers not displaying badges, and officers removing belongings that were never accounted for in police reports and other court documents. The misconduct lead to dismissal of 57 criminal cases.

The SFPD has also been criticized for the high salaries received by staff. Due to the high cost of living in the Bay Area, SFPD officers starting salary is the highest in the country at $88,842 to $114,164.[18] Greg Suhr, is the highest paid police chief in the country, at $321,577.[19]

Stations[edit]

The SFPD currently has 10 main police stations throughout the city in addition to a number of police substations.

Metro Division:

Golden Gate Division:

Sub Station and Special Division

Fallen officers[edit]

Since the establishment of the San Francisco Police Department, 101 officers have died in the line of duty.[20]

The cause of deaths are as follows:

Cause of death# of deaths
Aircraft accident
3
Assault
1
Automobile accident
6
Bomb
1[21]
Drowned
1
Electrocuted
1
Fall
1
Gunfire
59
Gunfire (Accidental)
2
Heart attack
3
Motorcycle accident
6
Stabbed
2
Struck by streetcar
3
Struck by vehicle
4
Vehicle pursuit
5
Vehicular assault
2
Weather/Natural disaster
1[22]

Demographics[edit]

The diversity of the department has increased significantly since 1972, when only 150 of the department's 2000 officers were of a non-white background.[24]

SFPD chiefs of police[edit]

NameTerm
Malachi Fallon1849–1850
Brandt Sequine1851–?
John W. McKenzie ?–1856
James F. Curtis1856–1858
Martin J. Burke1858–1866
Patrick Crowley1866–1873
Theodore G. Cockrill1873–1875
Henry H. Ellis1875–1877
John Kirkpatrick[25]1877–1879
Patrick Crowley1879–1897
Isaiah W. Lees1897–1900
William P. Sullivan1900–1901
George Wittman1901–1905
Jeremiah F. Dinan1905–1907
William J. Biggy1907–1908
Jesse B. Cook1908–1910
John B. Martin1910
John Seymour1910–1911
David A. White1911–1920
Daniel J. O'Brien1920–1928
William J. Quinn1929–1940
Charles W. Dullea1940–1947
Michael Riordan1947
Michael Mitchell1948–1950
Michael Gaffey1951–1955
George Healy1955–1956
Francis J. Ahern1956–1958
Thomas J. Cahill1958–1970
Alfred J. Nelder1970–1971
Donald M. Scott1971–1975
Charles Gain1975–1980
Corneilius P. Murphy1980–1986
Frank M. Jordan1986–1990
Willis Casey1990–1992
Richard D. Hongisto1992
Anthony D. Ribera1992–1996
Fred H. Lau1996–2002
Prentice E. Sanders2002–2003
Alex Fagan2003–2004
Heather Fong2004–2009
George Gascón2009–2011
Jeff Godown (Interim Chief)2011
Greg Suhr2011–
Source:[26]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://post.ca.gov/Data/Sites/1/post_docs/hiring/le-employment-stats.pdf
  2. ^ a b USDOJ.gov[dead link]
  3. ^ Ackerson, Sherman; Dewayne Tully. "SFPD: SFPD History". San Francisco Police Department. 
  4. ^ (De Russailh, Albert Bernard) Crane, Clarkson. Last Adventure- San Francisco in 1851. Translated from the Original Journal of Albert Bernard de Russailh by Clarkson Crane. San Francisco. The Westgate Press. 1931
  5. ^ SFGOV.org. SFGOV.org. Retrieved September 7, 2011.
  6. ^ SFgov.org. SFgov.org. Retrieved September 7, 2011.
  7. ^ [1][dead link]
  8. ^ SFpatrolspecpolice.com[dead link]
  9. ^ SFGOV.org. SFGOV.org. Retrieved September 7, 2011.
  10. ^ Geocities.com. Web.archive.org (October 26, 2009). Retrieved September 7, 2011.
  11. ^ Policemag.com. Policemag.com. Retrieved September 7, 2011.
  12. ^ SFHA.org. SFHA.org. Retrieved September 7, 2011.
  13. ^ SFweekly.com. SFweekly.com (November 29, 1995). Retrieved September 7, 2011.
  14. ^ SFweekly.com. SFweekly.com (November 22, 1995). Retrieved September 7, 2011.
  15. ^ "San Francisco Police Department : Lateral Entry Program". Sf-police.org. November 5, 2012. 
  16. ^ "Smashwords – The 1937 San Francisco Police Graft Report by Edwin Atherton – A book by Hank Chapot". Smashwords.com. February 11, 2012. 
  17. ^ "SF crime lab at center of growing scandal". Yahoo! News
  18. ^ "San Francisco Police Department : Duties, Salary and Benefits". Sf-police.org. November 26, 2012. 
  19. ^ "Greg Suhr, San Francisco Police Chief, Highest-Paid Cop in Nation". Huffington Post. August 26, 2012. 
  20. ^ ODPM.org. Odmp.org. Retrieved September 7, 2011.
  21. ^ San Francisco Police Department Park Station bombing
  22. ^ 1906 San Francisco earthquake
  23. ^ Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics, 2000: Data for Individual State and Local Agencies with 100 or More Officers[dead link]
  24. ^ San Francisco – News – Earl’s Last Laugh. Sfweekly.com (February 21, 2007). Retrieved September 7, 2011.
  25. ^ Kevin Mullen, "History of the Chinatown Squad", Part 4, POA Journal, December 1, 2007
  26. ^ "Chiefs of the SFPD", City and County of San Francisco. Bicycle.sfgov.org. Retrieved September 7, 2011.

External links[edit]