SAG-AFTRA

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SAG-AFTRA
SAG-AFTRA logo.png
Full nameScreen Actors Guild‐American Federation of Television and Radio Artists
FoundedMarch 30, 2012 (as SAG-AFTRA)
September 17, 1952 (as AFTRA)
July 12, 1933 (as SAG)
Members165,000+
CountryUnited States
AffiliationAAAA (AFL-CIO), IFJ, FIA
Key people

Ken Howard, President
Gabrielle Carteris, Executive Vice President
Amy Aquino, Secretary-Treasurer
Clyde Kusatsu, National VP, LA
Mike Hodge, National VP, NY
Ilyssa Fradin, National VP, Mid-Sized Locals
David Hartley-Margolin, National VP, Small Locals
Robert Newman, National VP, Actors/Performers
Catherine Brown, National VP, Broadcasters

Dan Navarro, National VP, Recording Artists
Office locationLos Angeles, California
5757 Wilshire Blvd.
Websitehttp://www.sagaftra.org
 
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SAG-AFTRA
SAG-AFTRA logo.png
Full nameScreen Actors Guild‐American Federation of Television and Radio Artists
FoundedMarch 30, 2012 (as SAG-AFTRA)
September 17, 1952 (as AFTRA)
July 12, 1933 (as SAG)
Members165,000+
CountryUnited States
AffiliationAAAA (AFL-CIO), IFJ, FIA
Key people

Ken Howard, President
Gabrielle Carteris, Executive Vice President
Amy Aquino, Secretary-Treasurer
Clyde Kusatsu, National VP, LA
Mike Hodge, National VP, NY
Ilyssa Fradin, National VP, Mid-Sized Locals
David Hartley-Margolin, National VP, Small Locals
Robert Newman, National VP, Actors/Performers
Catherine Brown, National VP, Broadcasters

Dan Navarro, National VP, Recording Artists
Office locationLos Angeles, California
5757 Wilshire Blvd.
Websitehttp://www.sagaftra.org

The Screen Actors Guild‐American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (SAG-AFTRA) is an American labor union representing over 160,000 film and television principal and background performers, journalists, and radio personalities worldwide. The organization was formed on March 30, 2012, following the merger of the Screen Actors Guild (created in 1933) and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (created in 1952).[1]

As of January 2013, Variety reported that the merger had proceeded with "few bumps", amid shows of good will on both sides. The stickiest remaining problem was reported to be the merger of the two pension funds, in part as a way of dealing with the issue of performers who paid into each plan, yet did not quite earn enough under either of the old plans to qualify for a pension.[2]

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