Ruth Marcus (journalist)

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Ruth Allyn Marcus (born May 1958) is an American journalist who currently writes an op-ed column for The Washington Post. In March 2007, she was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize in commentary.[1] The Pulitzer board cited "her intelligent and incisive commentary on a range of subjects, using a voice that can be serious or playful".

Contents

Biography

Background and education

Marcus was born in Philadelphia and grew up in a Jewish family in Livingston, New Jersey.[2] Both her parents were pharmacists. She attended school in Livingston with and has remained a close friend of fellow columnist Mona Charen.[3] She studied at Yale University where she wrote for the college newspaper.

Career

Harvard Law School

After completing her Yale degree, Marcus wrote for the National Law Journal, before attending Harvard Law School, from which she graduated in 1984.

The Washington Post

Marcus began writing for The Washington Post while still in law school, and formally joined the paper after graduation.

From her Washington Post biography:

"Marcus has been with The Post since 1984, beginning as a reporter on the Maryland staff, covering local development and other issues, and then transferring to the District staff to cover lawyers and legal issues. She joined the national staff in 1986, covering campaign finance, the Justice Department, the Supreme Court and the White House. From 1999 through 2002, she served as deputy national editor, supervising reporters who covered money and politics, Congress, the Supreme Court, and other national issues. She joined the editorial board in 2003.[4] She identifies as a liberal with the Democratic party.[5]

Personal

Marcus is married to Federal Trade Commission Chairman Jon Leibowitz.[6] The couple have two daughters, Emma and Julia.

References

  1. ^ Ruth Marcus biography
  2. ^ Jewish Women International: "Ruth Marcus - Writing Columns About the Personal and the Political" by Susan Josephs retrieved August 12, 2012
  3. ^ Mona Charen and Ruth Marcus, C-SPAN Q&A (television), July 9, 2006. Accessed February 24, 2011. "Brian Lamb, C-SPAN: Ruth Marcus, can you remember the first time you met Mona Charen? Ruth Marcus, Author: I can't remember the first time but I can remember many other times in the middle there because we were – we both started in Livingston, New Jersey in fourth grade."
  4. ^ "Connect with Ruth Marcus". The Washington Post. http://projects.washingtonpost.com/staff/articles/ruth+marcus/.
  5. ^ "Q&A with Ruth Marcus and Mona Charen". C-Span. http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/285133-1/.
  6. ^ Marcus, Ruth (December 5, 2011). "Gloria Cain, the human political prop". The Washington Post. http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan/post/gloria-cain-the-human-political-prop/2011/12/05/gIQA4y1DXO_blog.html?hpid=z2.

External links