Russian dressing

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Russian dressing
Salad dressing
Hamburger topped with grilled onions, cheese and russian dressing.jpg
Cheeseburger topped with grilled onions and Russian dressing
Place of origin:
United States
Region or state:
New Hampshire
Creator(s):
James E. Colburn
Main ingredient(s):
Mayonnaise, ketchup, horseradish, pimentos, chives, spices
Variations:
Thousand Island dressing
Recipes at Wikibooks:
Cookbook Russian dressing
Media at Wikimedia Commons:
Wikimedia Commons  Russian dressing
 
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Russian dressing
Salad dressing
Hamburger topped with grilled onions, cheese and russian dressing.jpg
Cheeseburger topped with grilled onions and Russian dressing
Place of origin:
United States
Region or state:
New Hampshire
Creator(s):
James E. Colburn
Main ingredient(s):
Mayonnaise, ketchup, horseradish, pimentos, chives, spices
Variations:
Thousand Island dressing
Recipes at Wikibooks:
Cookbook Russian dressing
Media at Wikimedia Commons:
Wikimedia Commons  Russian dressing

Russian dressing is a salad dressing invented in Nashua, New Hampshire, by James E. Colburn, likely in the 1910s.[1][2] (Colburn first named his experiment Russian mayonnaise, labels for which are today in the possession of collectors.) Typically piquant, it is today characteristically made of a blend of mayonnaise and ketchup complemented with such additional ingredients as horseradish, pimentos, chives and spices.[3][4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shalhoup, Dean (22 July 2012). "City gave roots to numerous famous inventions". Nashua Telegraph. Retrieved 22 July 2012. 
  2. ^ "Colburn popularized Mayonnaise". Nashua Telegraph. 30 July 1930. Retrieved 22 July 2012. 
  3. ^ Stewart, Frances Elizabeth (1920). Lessons in Cookery 2. New York, New York (USA): Rand McNally & Company. p. 123. Retrieved 13 April 2012. 
  4. ^ George, Mrs. Alexander (24 April 1941). "Menus of the Day". Lewiston Morning Tribune (Lewiston, Idaho, USA: Lewiston Morning Tribune). p. 3. Retrieved 13 April 2012. 

External links[edit]