Romaine Tenney

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Romaine Tenney
BornMay 7, 1900
Ascutney, VT
DiedSeptember 12, 1964
Ascutney, Vermont
Cause of death
fire, suicide
NationalityAmerican
 
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Romaine Tenney
BornMay 7, 1900
Ascutney, VT
DiedSeptember 12, 1964
Ascutney, Vermont
Cause of death
fire, suicide
NationalityAmerican

Romaine Tenney (May 7, 1900 – September 12, 1964) was a American bachelor farmer from Ascutney, Vermont who refused to leave his home, a 75-acre farm, which had been owned by his family since 1892 and his lifelong residence, in order for the farm to be bisected for Interstate-91 to meet Route 131.[1] In the early morning hours of September 12, 1964, Tenney set fire to his barns and house and died in the blaze. A shotgun was found among the ruins and it is believed that Tenney committed suicide as the fire gained strength. The event made national news. Tenney was a quiet, friendly, and jovial man. He was kind, independent, and his yester-year approach made him beloved by all. He did not display any behavior that suggested a vigilante nature. He simply wanted to live out his days in the earthly place where he had been born and bred. A surveyor's gaze began the end for Romaine Tenney. The southbound lanes of I-91 at Exit 8 in Ascutney occupy what once was the Tenney farmstead.