Roger Harring

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Roger Harring
Sport(s)Football
Biographical details
Born(1932-10-04)October 4, 1932
Green Bay, Wisconsin
Playing career
Wisconsin–La Crosse
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1969–1999Wisconsin–La Crosse
Head coaching record
Overall261–75–7
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 NAIA National (1985)
2 NCAA Division III National (1992, 1995)
15 WIAC (1971, 1973–1975, 1978, 1980, 1982, 1986, 1989, 1991–1993, 1995–1996, 1999)
Awards
AFCA Division III Coach of the Year (1995)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2005 (profile)
 
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Roger Harring
Sport(s)Football
Biographical details
Born(1932-10-04)October 4, 1932
Green Bay, Wisconsin
Playing career
Wisconsin–La Crosse
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1969–1999Wisconsin–La Crosse
Head coaching record
Overall261–75–7
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 NAIA National (1985)
2 NCAA Division III National (1992, 1995)
15 WIAC (1971, 1973–1975, 1978, 1980, 1982, 1986, 1989, 1991–1993, 1995–1996, 1999)
Awards
AFCA Division III Coach of the Year (1995)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2005 (profile)

Roger Harring (born October 4, 1932) is a former American football player and coach. He won 340 games over forty two seasons at both the high school and college levels. After graduating from University of Wisconsin–La Crosse, Harring coached high school football in Wisconsin. As a high school coach, he won 79 games.

Harring coached at both Ladysmith and Wisconsin Rapids Lincoln High Schools.

In 1969, Harring accepted the head coaching job at his alma mater. At Wisconsin–La Crosse, Harring had a 261-75-7 record. He won 15 conference titles and three (1985, 1992, 1995) national championships before his retirement in 1999.

Since his retirement, Harring has been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. An attempt to rename the stadium at Wisconsin–La Crosse was controversial in the city of La Crosse and unpopular with the public. Numerous veterans groups opposed the naming to Harring Stadium and filed a lawsuit against the UWL regents stating that they violated the State's open meeting laws. The facility is officially called Veterans Memorial Sports Field Complex. The $18 million complex features a Veterans Hall of Honor, walkway and park that memorializes the sacrifice of veterans.[1]

See also

References